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Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History

Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History


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Admiral E. Eberle AP-123

Admiral E. Eberle

(AP-123: dp. 20,120, 1. 608'11", b. 75'6", dr. 26'6", s. 19 k. cpl. 618, a. 4 5", 8 40mm., 16 20mm., cl. Admiml W. S. Benson T. P2-SE2-R1)

Admiral E. Eberle (AP-123) was laid down on 15 February 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 681) by the Bethlehem Steel Corp., Alameda, Calif., launched on 14 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Earl Warren, the wife of the Governor of California who later became Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court, and acquired by the Navy and commissioned on 24 January 1945, Capt. G. C. Carlstedt, USCG, in command.

The transport was operated by the Naval Transportation Service and manned largely by Coast Guard personnel. On 6 March she departed San Francisco with troops and supplies bound for New Guinea. She made stops at Finschhafen and Hollandia before dropping anchor at Manus Island on 25 March. While there a Navy plane crashed into the starboard side of the ship. Both occupants of the plane were killed, and casualties on board Admiral E. Eberle numbered one dead and five wounded.

On 26 March, the ship sailed in convoy for the Philippines. After loading boons at Leyte, Admiral E. Eberle proceeded to Manila. There, she embarked over 2,000 civilians for transportation to the United States. These passengers were mainly American citizens who had been interned in the Philippines since Japanese forces captured the islands in the spring of 1942. Admiral E. Eberle returned to Leyte on 13 April to pick up Armv personnel, then sailed, via Ulithi, for the west coast of the United States and reached San Pedro Calif., on 2 May.

The ship's next voyage took her across the Atlantic to Italy. Arriving at Naples on 4 June, she embarked Army personnel and baggage for transportation to Trinidad. The transport reached Trinidad on 18 June and soon reversed her course, bound for France. At Le Havre, Admiral E. Eberle embarked over 4,000 homeward-bound troops whom she put ashore upon her arrival at Norfolk on 6 July.

Admiral E. Eberle stood out to sea again on 14 July for another voyage to France. She touched at Marseilles and took on board troops destined for the Philippines. Eberle steamed via the Panama Canal and Ulithi, arrived at Luzon on 29 August debarked part of her passengers, and moved on to Manila. The transport returned to the United States in September and put into Seattle, Wash., for upkeep. Between October 1945 and March 1946, Admiral E. Eberle made three voyages to Japan and Korea.

Admiral E. Eberle was decommissioned on 8 May 1946 and returned to the Maritime Commission for transfer to the Army. Her name was struck from the Navy list in June 1946. The Army acquired the transport that same month and subsequently renamed her General Simon B. Buckner.

The ship was once again transferred to the Navy on 1 March 1950 and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service. The transport steamed across the Pacific throughout the Korean conflict, transporting troops and equipment to Japan and other staging areas. General Simon B. Buckner continued operations in the Pacific until 15 February 1955, when she departed San Francisco, bound for New York.

Upon arrival two weeks later, she was assigned to the New York-Bremerhaven runs. During the next 10 years, General Simon B. Buckner made over 130 Atlantic voyages from New York to Bremerhaven, Southampton, and the Mediterranean.

Departing New York on 11 August 1965, she returned to the west coast, arriving at Long Beach on the 27th to assist in the movement of troops and equipment to southeast Asia. After two cruises to Vietnam, the veteran transport resumed operation in the Atlantic, arriving at New York on 3 December.

During the next eight months, she steamed across the Atlantic 10 times, making stops at Bremerhaven and Southampton. Returning to the west coast in August 1966, General Simon B. Buckner was once again pressed into service to carry war material to Vietnam. She departed San Francisco on 8 September and reached Danang 20 days later. Following her return to San Francisco on 16 October, she continued to support American operations in southeast Asia until President Nixon's Vietnamization program decreased the Navy's need for transports. She was returned to the Maritime Administration on 24 March 1970.


Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History


Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History

USS Admiral E. W. Eberle , a 9,676-ton (light displacement) Admiral W. S. Benson -class transport built by the Maritime Commission to its P2-SE2-R1 design, was commissioned in January 1945 with a largely Coast Guard crew. She departed San Francisco in March with troops and supplies for the Southwest Pacific, then moved to the Philippines where she embarked over 2,000 formerly interned civilians for repatriation to the United States. After arriving at San Pedro, California, in early May Admiral E. W. Eberle went to the Atlantic, where in June and early July she made a crossing carrying troops from Naples, Italy to Trinidad and another returning servicemen to the United States from Le Havre, France. In July and August the transport carried troops from Marseilles, France to the Philippines. After upkeep at Seattle, she made three voyages from the West Coast to Japan and Korea between October 1945 and March 1946. Admiral E. W. Eberle was decommissioned in May 1946 and transferred via the Maritime Commission to the Army.

The Army soon renamed the ship General Simon B. Buckner and operated her with a civilian crew as part of its water transportation service. She returned to the Navy in March 1950 when most of the larger Army ships became part of the newly-created Military Sea Transportation Service. Still civilian-manned and retaining her "General" name, the ship made numerous crossings of the Pacific in support of the Korean War. In February 1955 she departed San Francisco for New York, and during the next ten years completed over 130 Atlantic voyages between New York and Bremerhaven, West Germany, with some stops at Southampton, England, and trips to the Mediterranean. Between August and December 1965 the Buckner twice steamed from California to Vietnam, then returned to the East Coast and made ten more trips from New York to Bremerhaven and Southampton. She moved definitively to the West Coast in August 1966, supporting U.S. operations in Southeast Asia until March 1970, when she was placed out of service and returned to the Maritime Administration. Laid up during the following two decades, USNS General Simon B. Buckner was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in August 1990 and sold by the Maritime Administration in June 1997 for scrapping.

This page features, and provides links to, selected views concerning USS Admiral E. W. Eberle (AP-123), USAT General Simon B. Buckner and USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Admiral E. W. Eberle (AP-123)

Photographed circa late 1945 or early 1946, possibly at San Francisco.
Note that the ship's four 5"/38 guns have been removed. This probably occurred during an upkeep period at Seattle in September 1945.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 78KB 740 x 545 pixels

USS Admiral E.W. Eberle (AP-123)

Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in 1945 by her builder, the Bethlehem-Alameda Shipyard, Inc., of Alameda, California.
Transferred to the U.S. Army in 1946 and renamed General Simon B. Buckner , this ship became USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123) in 1950.

Copied from the book "Troopships of World War II", by Roland W. Charles.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 50KB 740 x 405 pixels

USAT General Simon B. Buckner (U.S. Army Transport)

Photographed circa 1946-1950.
The original image is printed on postcard stock.
Originally built as USS Admiral E.W. Eberle (AP-123), in 1950 this ship became USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123).

Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2007.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image size: 62KB 740 x 495 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Photographed in August 1951.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 61KB 740 x 605 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Photographed from an aircraft based at Naval Air Station, Seattle, Washington, 5 September 1952.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 54KB 740 x 505 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Photographed in March 1955 off Fort Mason, San Francisco, California.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 69KB 740 x 605 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Underway during the 1950s.
Photographed by Boersig.
The original image is printed on a postcard published by the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) for sale in its ships' stores.
See Photo # NH 105100-A for a reproduction of the reverse side of this postcard.

Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2007.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image size: 82KB 740 x 475 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Photographed during the 1950s or 1960s.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 67KB 740 x 605 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Letterpress reproduction of a photograph taken during the 1950s or 1960s.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 85KB 740 x 605 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Approaching her berth at Columbus Quay, Bremerhaven, West Germany. The tug Sirius is assisting. Buckner served on the New York to Bremerhaven route between 1955 and 1966.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 74KB 740 x 510 pixels

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Page made 6 March 2006
New images added and page divided 12 December 2007


Unidentified Military Ship?

Here is a photograph I picked up the weekend. I was hoping that one of our military friends on here could help me identify the ship. I assume it is a military ship, there is what appears to be sailors on board.
I apologize for the poor quality of the photo, however, it was somewhat faded to begin with and I was shooting through glass.
I realize there is not much info to go on.
Anything help appreciated.
enjoy

Comments

The "P" before the numbers is also a good indicator.

International Radio Call Sign:
November - Papa - Xray - Kilo
NPXK
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
USS Admiral E. W. Eberle Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons


Precedence of awards is from top to bottom, left to right
Top Row - American Campaign Medal - Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal
Bottom Row - Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal - World War II Victory Medal - Navy Occupation Service Medal (with Asia clasp)

USNS General Simon B. Buckner Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons

Precedence of awards is from top to bottom, left to right
Top Row - Navy Occupation Service Medal (with Asia clasp)
Second Row - National Defense Service Medal (2) - Korean Service Medal (1) - Vietnam Service Medal (1)
Third Row - United Nations Service Medal - Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal - Republic of Korea War Service Medal (retroactive)

Admiral W. S. Benson Class Transport:
Laid down, 15 February 1943, as a Maritime Commission type (P2-SE2-R1) hull, under Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 681), at Bethlehem-Alameda Shipyard Inc., Alameda, CA.
Launched, 4 June 1944
Commissioned USS Admiral E. W. Eberle (AP-123), 24 January 1945, CAPT. George Carl Carlstedt, USCG, in command
During World War II USS Admiral E. W. Eberle (AP-123) was assigned to both the European-Africa-Middle East and Asiatic-Pacific Theaters
Following World War II USS Admiral E. W. Eberle was assigned to Occupation service in the Far East for the following periods:

Navy Occupation Service Medal (Asia)
4 to 18 November 1945
15 to 22 February 1946


Decommissioned, 8 May 1946
Transferred to the US Army Transportation Service, circa 1946
Commissioned into Army Transportation Service (ATS) as USAT Admiral E.W. Eberle circa 1946
Renamed USAT General Simon B. Buckner circa 1946
Reacquired by the Navy, 1 March 1950
Assigned to the Military Sea Transport Service (MSTS)
Placed in service as USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)
USNS General Simon B. Buckner was assigned to Occupation service in the Far East for the following periods:

Navy Occupation Service Medal (Asia)
11 to 13 March 1950
18 to 23 April 1950


During the Korean War USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123) saw service in the war zone from July 1950 to July 1954 and participated in the following campaign:
Korean War Campaign Campaign and Dates
Inchon Landing, 15 to 17 September 1950

During the Vietnam War USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123) participated in the following campaign:
Vietnam War Campaigns Campaign and Dates
Vietnamese Counteroffensive-Phase II, September and November 1967


USS Admiral E. W. Eberle

USS Admiral E. W. Eberle (AP-123) probably off San Francisco, California circa late 1945 or early 1946.

Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

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Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will exceed your Expectations

A great part of naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Admiral E W Eberle AP 123 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Commissioning ceremonies
  • Crew roster (name, rank and home address)
  • Ships log showing location, dates and mileage
  • Divisional group photos
  • Many shipboard crew activity photos

Over 111 pictures and the ships story told on 50 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Transport during World War II.


Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History

This page features additional views related to USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

In drydock at the North German Lloyd shipyard at Bremerhaven after suffering ice damage to her propeller structure in the Weser River the previous winter. Buckner served on the New York to Bremerhaven route between 1955 and 1966.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the Military Sealift Command collection at the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 89KB 590 x 765 pixels

MSTS transports in Ready Reserve

Four MSTS Atlantic Fleet transports in Ready Reserve at the Cavin Point Army Depot, New York, circa early 1967. The ship in the right foreground is USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123), with USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127) on the far side of the pier. Ahead of them respectively are USNS General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122) and USNS General Maurice Rose (T-AP-126).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph,
from the Military Sealift Command collection.

Online Image: 55KB 740 x 575 pixels

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)

Reverse side of a postcard published during the 1950s by the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) for sale in its ships' stores.
See Photo # NH 105100 for a reproduction of the front side of this postcard, featuring a photograph of General Simon B. Buckner underway.
Text and graphics on the reverse of this postcard are printed in black ink.

Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2007.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image size: 54KB 740 x 500 pixels

One of the ships seen in the following view may be USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123):

USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127)

Pierside at Bremerhaven, Germany, in 1963. Underway on the left is USNS Geiger (T-AP-197), and in the distance in the center is one of Darby 's sisters, most likely either General Alexander M. Patch (T-AP-122) or General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123).


Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History

United States Maritime Commission P-Type Passenger Ships used in World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War

P1-S2-L2
The two P1-S2-L2 ships were built for the Navy and used as Attack Transports (APA). They were 411.5 feet long, 56 beam, 34 foot depth, 19 foot draft, 6,710 gross tons, 2,150 deadweight tons, 4,351 displacement tons. they had twin greared turbines 8,800 horsepower, speed 19 knots.

P2-SE2-R1, P2-S2-R2, P2-SE2-R3 Type Ships
The P2-S2-R2 types, named for Generals, were built at Federal Shipbuilding in Kearny, New Jersey the P2-SE2-R1 types, named for Admirals, were built by Bethlehem Steel in Alameda, California. The intended use of the West Coast-built ships after the War was for trans-Pacific service, while the New Jersey-built ships were intended for the South American service.

The Admiral D. W. Taylor and the Admiral E.W. Eberle were laid down as P2-SE2-R1 type, but cancelled with the end of fighting and completed as P2-SE2-R3 type President Cleveland and President Wilson for commercial service.

P2-S2-R2 "General" Troop capacity 5,200 4,500 to 4,800 Cargo 100,000 cubic feet 36,000-48,000 cubic feet Cruising Range 12,000 miles 15,000 miles Propulsion Unit Twin screw, turbo-electric Twin screw, C3 type geared turbines Horsepower 19,000 18,000 Draft 25 feet 29 feet Length overall 609 feet 623 feet Beam 75.5 feet 75.5 feet Depth 43.5 feet 51.5 feet Gross tons 17,001 17,951 Displacement tons 12,650 11,450 Deadweight tons 8,750 8,200 Speed 19 knots 19 knots

P2-S1-DN3 Type Ships
Three ships were laid down in 1950, designed for commercial service, but converted to troop transports before completion.

Troop capacity 1,500 troops + 396 officers
Shaft HP 13,750 horsepower
Length overall 503 feet
Beam 73 feet
Depth 49 feet
Gross tons 13,319
Displacement tons 17,600
Deadweight tons 6,898
Speed 19-20 knots

P3-S2-DL2 Type Post-war liners

Two ships were built, the Independence, completed in December 1950 and the Constitution, completed in May 1951.

1,042

30 feet

P4-S2 Type Ship "America"
The America was the first U.S. Maritime Commission program ship, laid in August 1938, launched in August 1939, and completed in June 1940. In June 1941 she began service as a troopship renamed West Point (AP 23). She resumed service as America in November 1946.

Troop capacity 5,000
Passengers
Twin screw steam turbine 55,000 horsepower
Length overall 682.4 feet
Beam 89.1 feet
Depth 37.2 feet
Draft
Gross tons 23,719
Speed rating 22.5 knots
Cruising range

SS United States was the last ship built for the U.S. Maritime Commission, completed in 1952.

Troop capacity 8,175
Twin screw steam turbine 34,000 horsepower
Length overall 723 feet
Beam 93.25 feet
Depth 45.3 feet
Gross tons 26,454
Displacement tons 34,4400
Speed rating 20 knots
Cruising range

1,984

Troop capacity (calculated) 14,000 plus 400 bed hospital
Passengers
Twin screw steam turbine 240,000 horsepower
Length overall 990 feet
Beam 101.5 feet
Draft 32.5 feet
Gross tons 38,216
Speed rating 42 knots

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Admiral C. F. Hughes, P2-S2-R2 (AP 124, renamed General Edwin D. Patrick, T-AP 124)
Admiral D. W. Taylor, laid down as P2-S2-R2 type, completed as P2-SE2-R3 type President Cleveland
Admiral E.W. Eberle, P2-S2-R2 (AP 123, renamed General Simon B. Buckner, T-AP 123)
Admiral F. B. Upham, P2-S2-R2 laid down as P2-S2-R2 type, completed as P2-SE2-R3 type President Wilson renamed Oriental Empress
Admiral H.T. Mayo, P2-S2-R2 (AP 125, renamed General Nelson M. Walker, T-AP 125)
Admiral Hugh Rodman, P2-S2-R2 (AP 126, renamed General Maurice Rose, T-AP 126)
Admiral R. E. Coontz, P2-S2-R2 (AP 122, renamed General Alexander M. Patch, T-AP 122)
Admiral W.L. Capps, P2-S2-R2 (AP 121, renamed General Hugh L. Gaffey, T-AP 121)
Admiral W. S. Benson, P2-S2-R2 (AP 120, renamed General Daniel I. Sultan, T-AP 120)
Admiral W. S. Sims, P2-S2-R2 (AP 127, renamed General William O. Darby, T-AP 127)
America, renamed West Point, reverted to America, P4-S2

Barrett, renamed, T-AP 196 laid down as President Jackson (II) training ship for New York State Maritime College renamed Empire State V renamed Empire State P2-S1-DN3

Geiger, laid down as President Adams (II) T-AP 197 P2-S1-DN3
General Alexander E. Anderson, P2-S2-R1 (AP 111, renamed General A. E. Anderson T-AP 111)
General C. H. Barth, laid down as completed as General William Weigel P2-S2-R1 (AP 119, later T-AP 119)
General George M. Randall, P2-S2-R1 (AP 115), later T-AP 115)
General Henry W. Butner, P2-S2-R1 (AP 113, renamed General H. W. Butner T-AP 113)
General J. C. Breckinridge, P2-S2-R1 (AP 176, later T-AP 176)
General John Pope, P2-S2-R1 (AP 110, later T-AP 110)
General M. C. Meigs, P2-S2-R1 (AP 116, later T-AP 116)
General W. H. Gordon, P2-S2-R1 (AP 117, later T-AP 117)
General W. P. Richardson, P2-S2-R1 (AP 118, renamed: La Guardia, Leilani, President Roosevelt, Atlantis, Emerald Seas)
General William A. Mann, P2-S2-R1 (AP 112, renamed General W. A. Mann T-AP 112)
General William Mitchell, P2-S2-R1 (AP 114, later T-AP 114)
General William Weigel, completed as laid down as General C. H. Barth P2-S2-R1 (AP 119, later T-AP 119)

President Adams (II) laid down as renamed Geiger T-AP 197 P2-S1-DN3
President Cleveland, laid down as P2-S2-R2 type named Admiral D. W. Taylor, completed as P2-SE2-R3 type
President Hayes (II) laid down as renamed Upshur T-AP 198 training ship for Maine Maritime Academy, renamed State of Maine P2-S1-DN3
President Jackson (II) laid down as renamed Barrett T-AP 196 training ship for New York State Maritime College Empire State V renamed Empire State P2-S1-DN3
President Wilson, laid down as P2-S2-R2 type named Admiral F. B. Upham completed as P2-SE2-R3 type renamed Oriental Empress

Upshur, laid down as President Hayes (II) T-AP 198 training ship for Maine Maritime Academy, renamed State of Maine P2-S1-DN3


Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History

Military Sea Transportation Service
US Navy

Looking for more information from military/civilian personnel assigned to or associated with the U.S. Army in Germany from 1945 to 1989. If you have any stories or thoughts on the subject, please contact me .

Capt. John M. Will, USN, of Perth Amboy, N. J. has been named MSTS representative for Europe, and is directing the organization of the service on the Continent and in Great Britain. He is making his headquarters in Heidelberg in order to maintain closer liaison with the EUCOM transportation division, which has been handling the sea and land transportation of EUCOM personnel.

Within the next few months, MSTS will take over the operation of Army transports.

Headquarters of MSTS ELM is located at Grosvenor Square in London.

The article goes into some detail on the organization and operations of the command.

From a recent article that appeared in the SERVICE FAMILY JOURNAL:

Since the Bremerhaven MSTS Office was opened in 1961, some 1,500,000 passengers have been processed through the port for return to the United States.

Approximately 20 MSTS (nucleus and controlled) ships called at Bremerhaven and other ports served by MSTSO Bremerhaven each month.

Seven of these transports -- USNS Darby, Rose, Buckner, Patch, Gordon, Upshur, and Geiger -- run a tight schedule between Bremerhaven and New York. Two other vessels - the reefers USNS Bals Eagle and Blue Jacket -- stop regularly at Bremerhaven.

As of July 1, the MSTS area headquarters in Europe will be moved to Bremerhaven, Germany. (Headquarters has been located in London since 1951.) In addition, an MSTS Office will be established at Rota, Spain, to replace the closing Naples office, and a new office will open at Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

Commander of the new MSTS setup in Bremerheven is Capt J. M. Seymour.

After the reorganization, the Eastern Atlantic sub-area at Bremerhaven will have under its direct control Rotterdam St. Nazaire, France and London. The Mediterranean sub-area is headquartered at Leghorn (Livorno), Italy and will include the new Rota office. The command also has a representative at Frankfurt, Germany.

MSTS at Bremerhaven will have a headquarters staff of 50 and will consist of a personnel and administration section, chief of staff, chief of operations, vessel operations section, cargo operations section and passenger operations section.

The Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean section of the MSTS command (at Bremerhaven) assumes operational control of these ships after they reach midway in the Atlantic. Their movements are directed by the US Navy's European Command Center in London until the ships enter the AOR of the Pacific MSTS command.

MSTSELM, which includes a sub-area commander in Leghorn, Italy and MSTS offices in Rotterdam and London, is commanded by Capt Gerald W. Rahill. The command also has representatives in 15 locations throughout Europe, North Africa and the Middle East who serve MSTS on a part-time basis whenever ocean transportation of DoD cargo is involved.

The bulk of military cargo coming into Europe moves through the Northern Europe ports of Antwerp, Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Bremerhaven, Bremen and Hamburg and into the inner regions by truck, rail and barge.

Cargo to the United Kingdom moves primarily through London and Felixstowe on container services.

The Mediterranean area still lags in facilities for container service but is moving to a greater use of container service as improvements come about.


Headquarters, MSTS Office Bremerhaven

The MSTS mission - a troop ship pulls away from the pier at Bremerhaven in 1958,
as it begins its voyage back to the States with US service members and their
dependents returning from a tour of duty in Europe.

USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey (T-AP-121) (Jim Gibson)

USNS General Simon B. Buckner (T-AP-123)


USNS General William O. Darby (T-AP-127)

USNS General Alexander M. Patch T-AP-122
USNS General Simon B. Buckner T-AP-123
USNS General Maurice Rose T-AP-126
USNS General William O. Darby T-AP-127

From 1946 to 1950, the transports served as part of the Army Transport Service .

In 1950, the ships were transferred back to the US Navy and assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service .

Other ships were added to the regular Atlantic service at a later date:

The Buckner was formerly known as the transport Admiral E. W. Eberle. The ship was converted for its new role at a cost of $4.5 million. The Buckner is one of ten TC vessels (1) that make up the TC fleet - five of the transports are earmarked for Atlantic service, the others wil be used in the Pacific.

Troop accomodations consist of compartments four-bunks high.

Dependent quarters consist of two, three, four and six-bunk cabins, most with connecting baths. Some of the cabins have settee berths, the upper berth folding into the ceiling.

Troops and dependents have separate dining areas.

The transports are also equipped with a playroom and playpens on the top deck, as well as nurseries.

(1) Looking at the information provided on Wikipedia (www.wikipedia.org/wiki/P2_transport) it appears that only 8 of the ships actually entered into service as part of the Army Transport Service (T-AP-120 thru T-AP-127). Only four of these (the Patch, Buckner, Rose and Darby) were part of the regular Atlantic passenger service in the late 1940s and 1950s.

Throughout the following months the battalion went through intense training to prepare for the trans-Atlantic move and the new overseas mission.

In early February, the battalion was transported by train to the Brooklyn Army Terminal, N.Y. where it was embarked on the USNS Geiger for shipment to Germany.

Bremerhaven officials reported that port calls for servicemen and US Forces families due to return to the US aboard MSTS ships would be rescheduled for air transportation. Affected were passengers scheduled to leave Bremerhaven aboard the transports Buckner on July 31, the Geiger on Aug 6, the Rose on Aug 13 and the Geiger on Aug 30. Passengers scheduled to leave Bremerhaven on the Rose on July 17 would not be affected.

The DoD announcement also stated that the current MSTS fleet of 15 transports would be cut to 8 in the next 12 months. All but one of the trans-Atlantic service ships would be used to support Vietnam operations. The four Atlantic-run ships to be used to support military operations in SE Asia are the Patch, Darby, Buckner and Geiger. The ships are required to move more combat and support troops to Vietnam during the current buildup.

(In June, sailings of the Patch and Darby were cancelled and passengers were given a new port call for air travel from Rhine-Main.)

MSTS ships generally carry 400 to 450 cabin-class passengers and some 1,000 servicement in troop compartments.

Cargo runs by MSTS and MSTS-chartered ships are not affected by this announcement and will continue in the Atlantic and Pacific areas.

All eight played important roles in the past 25 years carrying troops, dependents, refugees and war brides between Europe, the US and the Far East. During the US military buildup in Vietnam, the troopships were taken off their normal trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific runs and carried two-thirds of the troops from the US to Vietnam combat.

Six of the eight (including the four former trans-Atlantic vessels) are now moored in New York and will be transferred to the Maritime Administration reserve fleet at James River, Va. (The other two are now in San Francisco and they will be taken to the reserve fleet at Suisun Bay, Calif.)


Admiral E. W. Eberle AP-123 - History

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will exceed your Expectations

A great part of naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Admiral E W Eberle AP 123 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Commissioning ceremonies
  • Crew roster (name, rank and home address)
  • Ships log showing location, dates and mileage
  • Divisional group photos
  • Many shipboard crew activity photos

Over 111 pictures and the ships story told on 50 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Transport during World War II.


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