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Hitler Triumphant: Alternate Decisions of World War II, ed. Peter G. Tsouras

Hitler Triumphant: Alternate Decisions of World War II, ed. Peter G. Tsouras


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Hitler Triumphant: Alternate Decisions of World War II. Tsouras

Hitler Triumphant: Alternate Decisions of World War II, ed. Tsouras

In general there are two approaches to counter-factual history. In the first the potential impact of a single change is considered - these tend to look at the better know 'what ifs?' and often conclude that very little would have changed. The other (used here) starts with both a change and an end point (in this case a German victory in the Second World War) and attempts to link the two.

For me this approach makes the book a little less valuable as an historical exercise but much more entertaining to read. A good example of this comes in the second chapter, which officially asks what might have happened if the Germans had realized that their Enigma code had been broken, but actually relies rather more on the death of Hitler in a car crash in 1943 to achieve a German victory. Likewise the chapter on a neutral Italy relies on the death of Mussolini to work, and others rely on rather improbable sequences of German successes.

Despite these minor flaws this is still an entertaining work of counter-factual history, with some thought provoking material on the overall course of the war.

Chapters
1 - May Day: The Premiership of Lord Halifax
2 - Peace in Our Time: Memories of Life at Führer Headquarters
3 - The Spanish Gambit: Operation FELIX
4 - Navigare Necesse Est, Vivere Non Est Necesse, Mussolini and the Legacy of Pompey the Great
5 - The Health of the State - Italy and Global War
6 - Black Cross, Green Crescent, Black Gold
7 - Wings Over the Caucasus: Operation LEONARDO
8 - To the Last Drop of Blood: The Fall of Moscow
9 - The Stalingrad Breakout: 'Raus Pulls You Through'
10 - For Want of an Island: The Fall of Malta and German Victory
11 - Ike' Cockade: The Allied Invasion of France 1943

Author: Various
Edition: Paperback
Pages: 288
Publisher: Frontline
Year: 2011 edition of 2006 original



Hitler Triumphant: Alternate Decisions of World War Ii Paperback – 1 July 2011

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Edited by the author of Disaster at D-Day , a collection of alternative histories that force readers to consider what could happen if the Nazis won World War II.

Based on a series of fascinating “what ifs” posed by leading military historians, this compelling new alternate history reconstructs the moments during the Second World War that could conceivably have altered the entire course of the war and led to a German victory.

Based on real battles, actions, and characters, each scenario has been carefully constructed to reveal how at points of decision a different choice or minor incident could have set in motion an entirely new train of events altering history forever. Scenarios in this volume include the fall of Malta in 1942 and the likely consequences and the possibility of Halifax making peace with Hitler.

Contributors include John Prados, editor of The White House Tapes: Eavesdropping on the President David Isby, editor of Fighting the Invasion and The Luftwaffe Fighter Force and Nigel Jones, author of The War Walk and Rupert Brooke: Life, Death and Myth .

Praise for Hitler Triumphant

“An entertaining work of counter-factual history, with some thought-provoking material on the overall course of the war.” —History of War

“The analysis of battle strategy and military might makes for a top pick for military readers seeking more than fantasy speculation.” —Midwest Book Review


WWII Book Review: Hitler Triumphant

Let’s get the prejudices out of the way early: Hitler Triumphant is a work of fiction rather than a history of the greatest of wars. It contains 11 unrelated chapters, each of which presents a series of hypothetical events, some quite fanciful, that result in Adolf Hitler’s Germany winning World War II. The authors have even gone to the trouble to invent footnotes as a means of increasing the verisimilitude of these fantasy scenarios (e.g., “The six [Goebbels] children have had a varied career following the unfortunate death of their father hunting with the Führer. Probably the most famous… became ambassador to the United States and married Richard M. Nixon, future president of the United States”) as well as referencing books that have never been— and will never be—written, such as Colonel David Glasshouse’s Fallschirmjäger Over Moscow: The Daring German Airborne Assault That Captured Moscow and Heinz Guderian’s Panzers to the Pacific: The March Across Asia.

The most serious problem is that the authors of these alternate history scenarios are not particularly skilled at writing fiction. Some of the writing, especially the invented conversations, is simply cringeworthy. In the introduction, editor Peter G. Tsouras refers to The Man in the High Castle, a 1962 novel by Philip K. Dick set in a variant future in which the Axis had won the war (largely because of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s early death). Dick was a brilliant if quirky writer, and evoking his memory is unfortunate because it emphasizes the lower literary quality of so much of the writing in Hitler Triumphant.

That said, there is still a great deal to recommend here. First of all, Tsouras has assembled an A-Team of well-known historians and military analysts who have given a great deal of thought to the various turning points in World War II. An essay by John Prados (Presidents’ Secret Wars Valley of Decision) has Hitler opt for an assault on Gibraltar in February 1941. The troops—air, land and sea—operate more or less within their historical capabilities, and the action is described in extremely close operational detail. A reader will learn a lot about the defenses of Gibraltar, the strength of the garrison and the most likely avenues of an Axis attack. Prados refrains from detailed speculation on the ramifications, disposing of the impact in a paragraph that notes the fall of the Churchill government as a result. Precisely because of its cautious embrace of alternate history, Prados’ essay is the highlight of the book.

Equally good is an essay by John Burtt on what might have happened had Malta surrendered to the Axis. Burtt’s approach is counterintuitive, to be sure: The fall of the island does not provide the logistical panacea for Erwin Rommel and Panzerarmee Afrika that generations of historians seem to have taken for granted. While secure supply lines across the Mediterranean would certainly have made it easier to build up supplies in Tripoli, Burtt points out that it would still not have had a material effect on the fighting at El Alamein, 1,500 miles to the east. Axis forces in North Africa lacked the motor transport to get enough supplies forward no matter how much might have been available in Africa.

David C. Isby conjures a very different kind of Fascist Italy that remains neutral in the war, is allied to the United States and becomes a key player in the U.S.- dominated postwar world. Mussolini was unlikely to have followed any of these wise policies, of course, but Isby kills him off in a plane crash on New Year’s Eve 1939 to be succeeded as duce by his less ideological and more pragmatic son-in-law, Count Galeazzo Ciano. Isby’s analysis is valuable not for the scenario it paints so much as for allowing the reader to contemplate the real importance of Mussolini’s personality to Italy’s wartime policy. If ever there was an individual solely responsible for embroiling his nation in WWII, Mussolini fills the bill.

Taken together, the essays by Prados, Burtt and Isby also manage to present a fairly consistent argument, a rare thing in a collection of disparate works. All suggest one way or another that Hitler should have paid more attention to the Mediterranean. The Wehrmacht bled itself to death fighting a manpower- and materiel-intensive war in the Soviet Union, they argue, when it might have won a decisive victory over Great Britain by smashing its empire in North Africa and the Near East. Indeed, one or two more panzer divisions in North Africa might well have been decisive. All these are debatable points, certainly, but they cannot be dismissed out of hand.

Other Hitler Triumphant writers concentrate on the war in the East, and the results are quite mixed. Kim H. Campbell has Hitler eschewing the Kiev diversion in 1941 in favor of a rapid thrust toward Moscow, which has more or less become the textbook solution to the campaign in the years since 1941. In his own contribution to the collection, Tsouras focuses on the attempted German relief of Stalingrad, Operation Winterstorm. Here, the actual thrust from outside the Stalingrad pocket by General Erhard Raus’ 6th Panzer Division finds its counterpart in a breakout attempt from inside the pocket. Tsouras has the historical commander of the encircled Sixth Army, General Friedrich Paulus, suffer a breakdown, and replaces him with his most aggressive corps commander, General Walther von Seydlitz-Kurzbach, one of the officers who historically argued on behalf of a breakout. Again, arguing that the Sixth Army should have broken out of Stalingrad has been the historical consensus since 1942.

The pieces by Campbell and Tsouras are well-done, although each grounds itself firmly in the war’s now-discredited literature that blames every bad decision made between 1939 and 1945 on Hitler and completely exonerates the staff and commanders under him. In reality, Hitler wasn’t the only responsible voice supporting the thrust to Kiev in 1941, and the maneuver did result in an operational victory the likes of which the world will probably never see again. Some 700,000 Soviet prisoners fell into German hands, a true battle of annihilation. Likewise, Tsouras’ view of Raus’ brilliance as a divisional commander is based largely on Raus’ own memoirs, and the essay ignores the difficulties Sixth Army would have had in launching a breakout attempt. Its strategic mobility was zero, with its horse-drawn transport gone and its motorized columns almost completely immobilized for lack of fuel. Seydlitz, in fact, did order a miniature “pull back” in one of his LI Corps’ defensive sectors in preparation for a breakout very soon after Sixth Army was encircled. The Soviets spotted the maneuver, attacked and annihilated the better part of the German 94th Infantry Division. The role played by the commander of Army Group Don, Field Marshal Erich von Manstein, is also far more problematic than one would think from reading this essay.

More interesting, if only because it steps out of the ordinary, is a scenario from Paddy Griffith (Forward Into Battle Battle Tactics of the Western Front) that at first glance seems far-fetched, even ridiculous: a vast German paradrop onto the Caucasian oil fields in the fall of 1941. The Germans, let it be recalled, finished the historical campaigning season that year tossed out of Rostov and in retreat all along the southern front. Their repulse here even predated the disaster in front of Moscow. The old saw about airborne forces needing to be relieved by regular forces within 48 hours comes to mind German forces would have been months away from Grozny at the time. What saves this chapter, to my mind, is the thoughtful backdrop. Griffith makes the tiniest of changes in the timeline: The German paradrop onto Crete takes place a few days earlier than it did historically, May 16 instead of May 21. As a result, Commonwealth defenders are nowhere near the state of readiness they possessed during the actual event and the Germans are able to seize Crete with minimal losses. Rather than becoming disillusioned with airborne tactics, therefore, Hitler becomes their greatest enthusiast and builds an entire airborne army (the mythical “VII Luftflotte”) in the summer and early fall of 1941. Successful airborne assaults on the oil-producing cities of Maikop and Grozny soon follow, along with an even deeper drop onto Baku.

Hitler Triumphant is a thoughtful, well-edited and very well-chosen selection of essays. But every time I pick up a speculative volume about World War II, even one as successful as this, I have the same reaction: Why not just have Hitler run over by a bus in 1905 and call off the whole war?

Originally published in the April 2007 issue of World War II Magazine. To subscribe, click here.


ISBN 13: 9781853676994

Tsouras, Peter

This specific ISBN edition is currently not available.

Based on a series of fascinating What ifs posed by leading military historians, this compelling new alternate history recontructs the moments during World War II which could conceivably have altered the entire course of the Second World War and led to a German victory. Based on real battles, actions and characters, each scenario has been carefully constructed to reveal how, at points of decision, a different choice or minor incident could have set in motion an entirely new train of events altering history forever. Scenarios in this volume include the fall of Malta in 1942 and the likely consequences and the possibility of Halifax making peace with Hitler.

"synopsis" may belong to another edition of this title.

Peter G. Tsouras is noted military historian and a leading writer of alternative history with 22 titles to his credit on subjects ranging from Alexander the Great to the American Civil War and the Second World War. He recently retired from the US Government as a senior intelligence officer for the Defense Intelligence Agency. He served with the 1st Battalion 64th Armor on active duty with the US Army and subsequently retired as Lieutenant Colonel from the United States Army Reserve. He was born and raised in Las Vegas, Nevada, and currently resides in Alexandria, Virginia.

"Hitler Triumphant provides another alternate history 'what if' collection of scenarios, this using Hitler's decisions and key changing points during the war to provide a more scholarly survey of how different circumstances could have altered the outcomes and given Hitler victory. Most such coverages come from a science fiction viewpoint--but here the analysis of battle strategy and military might makes for a top pick for military readers seeking more than fantasy speculation."

World War II, April 2007

“Hitler Triumphant is a thoughtful, well-edited and very well-chosen selection of essays . Tsouras has assembled an A-Team of well-known historians and military analysts who have given a great deal of thought to the various turning points of World War II.”


Additional Information

Based on a series of fascinating &lsquowhat ifs&rsquo posed by leading military historians, this compelling new alternate history reconstructs the moments during the Second World War that could conceivably have altered the entire course of the war and led to a German victory.

Based on real battles, actions and characters, each scenario has been carefully constructed to reveal how at points of decision a different choice or minor incident could have set in motion an entirely new train of events altering history for ever. Scenarios in this volume include the fall of Malta in 1942 and the likely consequences and the possibility of Halifax making peace with Hitler.


Hitler Triumphant

'Hitler Triumphant is a thoughtful, well-edited and very well-chosen selection of essays . . . Tsouras has assembled an A-Team of well-known historians and military analysts who have given a great deal of thought to the various turning points of World War II'
&ndash World War II

Based on a series of fascinating 'what ifs' posed by leading military historians, this compelling new alternate history reconstructs the moments during the Second World War that could conceivably have altered the entire course of the war and led to a German victory.

Based on real battles, actions and characters, each scenario has been carefully constructed to reveal how at points of decision a different choice or minor incident could have set in motion an entirely new train of events altering history for ever. Scenarios in this volume include the fall of Malta in 1942 and the likely consequences and the possibility of Halifax making peace with Hitler.

Other contributors include JOHN PRADOS, editor of The White House Tapes: Eavesdropping on the President, DAVID ISBY, editor of Fighting the Invasion and The Luftwaffe Fighter Force and NIGEL JONES, author of The War Walk and Rupert Brooke, Life, Death and Myth.


A Storm of Steel and Fire (an alternate WW2 history)

By the time the Germans move over troops to invade the Low Countries and France, occupy those countries, garrison those countries, the Soviets would have had the opportunity to replenish their forces, not to a degree to defeat the German led Axis forces in the East but still reclaim lost territory. Also the Western Front is relatively inactive (except for air combat which is common and intense) The Germans pulling most of their forces from the East to attack the West just wouldn't make sense. There is no guarantee the French would lose and the problems the French population/government/military are suffering (lack of total war mobilization, lukewarm public support) will mainly go away when they noticed the Germans moving to the border.

The Germans would overrun the Low Countries but they could get bogged down in France. If they do they would be bogged down in France, bogged down in Scandinavia, which I admit could actually help the Axis farther down the road as the British and French, particularly the French, would want to protect their homeland but would still have to push the French and British out, having a very large front with the Soviet Union which while the Soviets would not have the strength to push back the Axis all the way back to the German border they could push very far. At best bet the Soviets could "liberate" most of Belarussia, Leningrad and surrounding territory, possibly almost to the Baltic States, some more of the Ukraine but they would exhaust themselves there.

The Soviets have suffered IMMENSE losses but they still have millions and millions to recruit upon, factories to churn out weapons and vehicles and a hatred of Fascism. So it wouldn't make sense for the Germans who have severely hurt the Soviets to just simply stop the momentum they gained and attack another enemy whose front, at least on land, has been relatively quiet which can lead the wounded Soviets to truly rebuild and replenish.

I suppose that makes sense. That logic is reversible, though the Germans currently have a large amount of conquered territory on their eastern frontier, plus they have an army that at least has a reasonable chance of defeating either of their two enemies. What they don't have are time or material resources. It at least makes basic strategic sense to trade space for time when possible, and it's only in the east where they can do that the Red Army is probably a lot less motorized than OTL, so it'll take quite some time for them to reach Germany proper. Poor infrastructure and weather conditions become their enemy in that case. In the meantime, the Heer only has a limited window of opportunity to conduct offensive operations before their economy literally runs out of gas. Continuing east doesn't solve that Soviet oil and mineral resources are still many miles away, and even if they were captured the infrastructure to transport them back to Germany doesn't exist. The distances in the West are shorter, there are more railroads to use, and France + the Low Countries are ripe for plundering. Sure, there's no guarantee of success over there, but that wouldn't change with the Soviets out Brest-Litovsk wasn't a panacea in 1918, either. So all in all, moving west is risky, but the rewards are greater, and the West needs to be confronted sooner or later. Better to do so with an intact and reasonably supplied Heer, I figure.

On a related note, do you have some estimates re: casualty figures so far? The USSR feels completely ravaged, but without numbers that's just a vague sentiment on the reader's part. Some additional data would put things into perspective.

Linense

Indeed, I think it could be quite "easy" that the Germans could get lucrative resources of the Caucasus, or at least prevent the Soviets to benefit from these great resources.

I mean, some time ago I read an alternative history book called Hitler Triumphant, by Peter G. Tsouras. This book is a compilation of several alternative histories, and one of them could be perfect for Tanner151's uchronia.

In particular I refer to the alternative story called "Wings Over the Caucasus: Operation LEONARDO", by Paddy Griffith.

It tells how the German paratroopers forces concentrated only in the western part of Crete during the airborne assault. Thus, this unit suffered very few casualties as to what happened in OTL, which caused Hitler to abandon the ideas of airborne assaults. In view of this POD, Hitler sees nothing wrong in airborne assaults. In this uchronia is told as during Operation Barbarossa, the German military high command considered essential to obtain as soon as possible the huge petroleum resources of the Caucasus, but all predicted German military plans that could only be achieved during the summer of 1942, and Hitler and some of his top advisers considered that time as very tardy and may eventually lead to Germany's defeat.

Therefore, they plan Operation Leonardo: during the month of October 1941 the bulk of the German airborne forces (which have been greatly expanded following the successful assault of Crete) to focus on the city's southeast that has been conquered by the Wehrmacht and is well protected (in Griffith's uchronia, that city is Henichesk, on the coast of the Sea of ​​Azov). From there, all the German airborne forces take off towards the city of Maikop, taking control of the airport and the city, creating a quick good defensive cordon. Within two days, they do the same maneuver in the Chechen capital, Grozny, where also succeed, and they also convince some leaders of Chechen ethnicity to help them in their struggle against Stalin (Chechens would be considered almost pure Aryans). Later, after waiting a week and a half in order to stock enough both in Maikop and Grozny, make their last scheduled stop: Baku. Achieve its mission, which is to control these three major cities of the Caucasus and although they may not send the oil to contribute to the German side, if they keep out into the hands of the Soviets, in addition to the previous steps to create a major military operation connecting those three cities with the rest of the territory conquered by the Germans.

Tanner151

I suppose that makes sense. That logic is reversible, though the Germans currently have a large amount of conquered territory on their eastern frontier, plus they have an army that at least has a reasonable chance of defeating either of their two enemies. What they don't have are time or material resources. It at least makes basic strategic sense to trade space for time when possible, and it's only in the east where they can do that the Red Army is probably a lot less motorized than OTL, so it'll take quite some time for them to reach Germany proper. Poor infrastructure and weather conditions become their enemy in that case. In the meantime, the Heer only has a limited window of opportunity to conduct offensive operations before their economy literally runs out of gas. Continuing east doesn't solve that Soviet oil and mineral resources are still many miles away, and even if they were captured the infrastructure to transport them back to Germany doesn't exist. The distances in the West are shorter, there are more railroads to use, and France + the Low Countries are ripe for plundering. Sure, there's no guarantee of success over there, but that wouldn't change with the Soviets out Brest-Litovsk wasn't a panacea in 1918, either. So all in all, moving west is risky, but the rewards are greater, and the West needs to be confronted sooner or later. Better to do so with an intact and reasonably supplied Heer, I figure.

On a related note, do you have some estimates re: casualty figures so far? The USSR feels completely ravaged, but without numbers that's just a vague sentiment on the reader's part. Some additional data would put things into perspective.

Great points. Mhmm your point on moving west does make sense and I regret not having thought of it earlier.

However I already have plans of what the world will look like post-war and how I have it pictured will be the result of how I planned 1943 and 1944. So while what you say makes incredible sense and I wish I could incorporate all or most of the elements in the time coming up I just cannot incorporate them at the time. But don't worry I do have reasons why I am going to do what I am doing. And yes the German army is far from Baku oil fields but the bulk of the Soviets will be focused in the Moscow area and do not doubt the assistance Germany's allies are giving. And, should I dare say, potential allies hmmm.

Casualties oh boy. I'd have to estimate 13-15 million. With no extensive ethnic cleansing in Russia due to Slavs being considered Aryan cousins this has lessened the amount killed by the SS. Jews, gypsies, mentally/physically handicapped are still persecuted but not Slavs themselves. Now the Soviet military has lost millions (7.5-8 million) with the remainder being civilians, killed by either side whether accidental or on purpose. Now this a ballpark answer, just general. Have to remember the Second Great Purge and all the following purges and rebellions did massive collateral damage throughout the USSR. I know this isn't dead on but I hope it helps.


Hitler Triumphant: Alternate Decisions of World War II, ed. Peter G. Tsouras - History

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'Hitler Triumphant is a thoughtful, well-edited and very well-chosen selection of essays . . . Tsouras has assembled an A-Team of well-known historians and military analysts who have given a great deal of thought to the various turning points of World War II' - Midwest Book Review

What if Winston Churchill's plane had been shot down and Halifax had become Prime Minister? Or if Goering had taken power after a successful assassination of Hitler? Or if Italy had not joined the Third Reich and the Axis?

Other scenarios in this volume include the fall of Malta in 1942, a successful Stalingrad breakout and a disastrous attempt to open a second front on the Cherbourg peninsular in 1943.

Based on a series of fascinating 'what ifs' posed by leading military historians, this compelling collection of alternate history essays rewrites the moments in World War II that could conceivably have altered the entire course of the war and led to a German victory.

Based on real battles, actions and characters, each scenario has been carefully constructed to reveal how different decisions or minor incidents could have set in motion an entirely new train of events, altering history forever.

Contributors include John Prados, editor of The White House Tapes: Eavesdropping on the President: David Isby, editor of Fighting the Invasion and The Luftwaffe Fighter Force: and Nigel Jones, author of The War Walk and Rupert Brooke, Life, Death and Myth.

These types of books can sometimes be a bit hit or miss, this one in my opinion is a hit. I would say mainly because the selection of essays is put together by some very good people, so when you look at some of the chapters, they make you think about their scenario. But of course, if they are putting forward something plausible, it makes you think. In some books, you don’t really know the author and some of the scenarios can seem out there because you don’t know who the writer is. Now I will admit I usually don’t read these books, but I really enjoyed this book and would happily recommend it to others, don’t be like me and be a bit more open-minded.

Read the full review here

UK Historian

An alternative history - albeit a chilling one, of the possible outcomes of the second world war had Hitler triumphed and not died an ignominious death. Absolutely fascinating, and quite scary.

Books Monthly

I am usually a bit wary about alternative histories, but this book is excellent, and the stories are very plausible one actually brought an ironic smile to my face when I realised who the author was writing about, just in the last sentence, very neatly done and enjoyable, going from a ‘you can’t really be serious about this’ to ‘yes, OK, I see it now’. Just as a good story should. The writing is good and easy for even the most lay person to follow with ease. Obviously, I won’t know how you would receive this but several of these stories did actually leaved me thinking – well, what if…….!

Read the full review here

Army Rumour Service (ARRSE)

Peter G Tsouras is a respected military historian and a leading writer of alternative history in addition to other subjects ranging from Alexander the Great to World War II. His books include Disaster at D-Day , The Daily Telegraph Dictionary of Military Quotations and (as editor and contributing author), Rising Sun Victorious , Dixie Victorious and Cold War Hot .


“Third Reich Victorious: Alternate Decisions of World War II”, edited by Peter G. Tsouras

256 pages, Greenhill Books, ISBN-13: 978-1853674921

I reviewed Peter G. Tsouras’ alternative history collection, Rising Sun Victorious: The Alternative History of How the Japanese Won the Pacific War, on July 27 th , 2019, so, I might as well review his other alternative history collection, Third Reich Victorious: Alternate Decisions of World War II, as well. Both books are a stimulating and entirely plausible (frightening) insight into how Hitler and his generals might have defeated the Allies and won the war, and over-all serves as a convincing sideways look at how the Third Reich’s bid at world domination in World War II could have plausibly gone the other way. First things first: Third Reich Victorious is a work of fiction rather than a history of the greatest of wars and contains 11 unrelated chapters, each of which presents a series of hypothetical events (some quite fanciful) that each results in Adolf Hitler’s Germany winning World War II (the authors have even gone to the trouble to invent footnotes as a means of increasing the verisimilitude of these fantasy scenarios). And what, pray, are these scenarios?

  • What if the Germans captured the whole of the BEF at Dunkirk?
  • What if the RAF had been defeated in the Battle of Britain?
  • What if the U-Boats had strangled Britain with an impregnable blockade?
  • What if Rommel had been triumphant in North Africa?
  • What if the Germans had beaten the Red Army at Kursk?
  • What if Goebbels killed Hitler and took over Germany?
  • What if Hitler had opted for an assault on Gibraltar in February 1941?
  • What if Malta had surrendered to the Axis?
  • What if Fascist Italy, like Fascist Spain, had remained neutral in the war?
  • What if Sixth Army had broken out of Stalingrad?
  • What if Germany had captured the Caucasian oil fields in the fall of 1941?

The authors, writing as if these and other world-changing events had really happened, project realistic scenarios based on the true capabilities and circumstances of the opposing forces and going so far as referencing books that have never been written (Fallschirmjäger Over Moscow: The Daring German Airborne Assault That Captured Moscow by the fictitious Colonel David Glasshouse, or Panzers to the Pacific: The March Across Asia by the very real Heinz Guderian). One problem with this collection is that the authors are not particularly skilled at writing fiction some of the writing, especially the invented conversations, is simply cringe-worthy (I won’t emphasize one author over another). In the introduction, editor Peter G. Tsouras refers to The Man in the High Castle, the1962 novel by Philip K. Dick (and current miniseries) set in a variant future in which the Axis had won the war Dick was a brilliant and prolific writer, but evoking his memory is unfortunate because it emphasizes the lower literary quality of so much of the writing in Third Reich Victorious . That said, there is still a great deal to recommend here, for Tsouras has assembled an A-Team of well-known historians and military analysts who have given a great deal of thought to the various turning points in World War II. Third Reich Victorious, like Rising Sun Victorious, is a thoughtful, well-edited and very well-chosen selection of essays.


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