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Neptune III AC-8 - History

Neptune III AC-8 - History


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III Neptune
(AC-8: dp. 19, 375; 1. 542'; b. 65'; dr. 27'7"; s. 12.9 k.; cpl. 104; a. 4 4")

The third Neptune (AC-8), a collier, was laid down by the Maryland Steel Co., Sparrows Point, Md. 23 March 1910 launched 21 January 1911; and placed in service with a merehant crew at Norfolk Navy Yard 20 September 1911, Master F. E. Horton, Naval Auxiliary Service, in command.

Except for a period out of service at Norfolk Navy Yard 6 May to 5 December 1912, Neptune operated along the east coast and in the Caribbean from Boston to Guantanamo Bay Cuba, supporting ships and installations of the Atlantic Fleet iTltO 1913. Continuing her replenishment operations, she made two coaling voyages to Vera Cruz, Mexico in the spring and summer of 1913, returned to Norfolk 8 September, decommissioned there 13 October, and was placed in reserve.

Neptune commissioned with a naval complement 7 December 1914 and resumed collier service with the Atlantic Fleet. Assigned to the Auxiliary Division, Atlantic Fleet 28 December 1915, she continued this duty into 1917, making four voyages to Santo Domingo between June 1916 and February 1917, carrying Marines, fuel and mail to support Navy and Marine Corps units protecting American interests in the Dominican Republie during unrest there.

When the United States entered World War I, Neptune was at Baltimore, Md., loading a general cargo. Departing that port, she put into Norfolk to embark a division of the 1st Aeronautical Detsehment and sailed 25 May for France escorted by destroyers Jarvis (DD-38) and Perkins (DD-26). Arriving St. Nazaire 8 June, the ship offloaded her cargo and disembarked her troops, the first American forces to land in Europe for service against the enemy. Neptune sailed for home 28 June, arriving New York 11 July and again resumed service with the Train, Atlantic Fleet, making one voyage to the Caribbean, 12 July to 27 August, and then operated off the Atlantic Coast, delivering coal to ports in Chesapeake Bay through the end of the war.

In 1919, following three voyages to Guantanamo Bay to supply naval forces at the training base there, the collier departed Norfolk 3 October for the Pacific, calling enroute at the Canal Zone, Niearaugua, and Honduras with Marines and cargo and arriving San Diego on the 20th. She then operated along the West Coast, coaling ships and supplying naval bases between Bremerton, Wash., and San Diego. Returning to the east coast the way she came, the collier arrived Norfolk 20 January lg20. Neptune made another coaling voyage to the west coast before departing Philadelphia 27 August for an eleven month eruise as part of the Train, Pacific Fleet. She visited Pearl Harbor 8 September to 25 October and eruised to Valparaiso, Chile in January and February of 1921 to coal units of the Battle Force engaged in maneuvers off the Chilean coast. The collier returned to Norfolk 11 July and made one more voyage to the West Coast 23 July to 30 December and a coaling cruise to the Caribbean, 25 January to 3 April 1922 before decommissioning at Boston 28 June.

Towed by tugs Kalmia (AT-23) and Wandank (AT-26) Neptune departed Boston 14 December on her last voyage, arriving Philadelphia three days later. There the ship remained, in reserve, until struck from the Navy List 14 May 1938 and sold for scrapping to Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia 18 April 1939.


Neptune III AC-8 - History

originally for AOMCI Knuckle Buster Chapter's THE KNUCKLE KNEWS - Vol. 18, #4

In 1930 the Muncie Gear Works of Muncie Indiana, started building and marketing a 2 hp opposed twin
outboard motor. From this modest beginning came a line of outboard motors that spanned almost 60 years.
In 1938 they produced the first of what would, many years later, evolve into the popular Neptune Mighty Mite.


This little engine was a carbon copy of the Evinrude Scout motor that had sold so well the previous year. It
was designated as the 1A38 or 138A model, and was rated at 1.2 hp. The same motor was produced, almost
unchanged, as the 1A39 or 139A in 1939. In 1940 the horsepower and bore were increased to 1.5hp, with the
introduction of the 10A1, and the 11A1 in 1941. The 15A1 of 1945/46 was 1.5 hp as well.
This group of engines was the first of the MIGHTY MITE style motors. They are easily distinguished by their
spark plug, which was mounted on the starboard side of the cylinder head. With the exception of the piston
and cylinder bore, almost all the parts were interchangeable within this first group.

In 1947 the motors were increased to 1.7 hp with the introduction of the 17A1 model. I believe this was the
first of the series to have the rear facing spark plug. The first appearance of the name MIGHTY MITE does not
come into use until the introduction of the AA1A in 1956/57. Until that year they were called the Junior Singles.

The Muncie Gear Works was heavily involved in military parts production during the Korean War. No
outboards, at all, were produced during the years 1952 and 1953. When the outboard line was restarted in
1954, only the AA1 and some A1 leftovers were made and sold. Reportedly they were also under threat of a
major lawsuit from OMC. Their 1948-51 larger models were way too close in appearance to those of the best
selling Johnson outboards of that period.

In 1956 Muncie moved the air conditioning and heat pump division to Cordele Georgia. The outboard motor
production was moved with them. From that time on, all Muncie&rsquos outboard motors were made at Cordele.
The 17A1 and A1 motors were light green with red decals. The AA1 and AA1-A motors were silver with
maroon fuel tanks. The decals read &ldquoNeptune&rdquo, although the sales literature called them &ldquoMighty Mite&rdquo from
1957-59.

Starting in 1960 and continuing thru 1969 the most common Mighty Mite, was made at Cordele. It was
designated the WC1 and is commonly know as the &ldquoGold Bug&rdquo or &ldquoGold Fish&rdquo motor. The entire motor was
painted gold and the fuel tank was squared off at the back. The previous models all had pointed or heart
shaped tanks. This motor carried the &ldquoMighty Mite&rdquo decal. There seems to have been thousands and
thousands of them made, but no one has ever been able to come up with exact production figures. The 17A1,
A1, AA1A and WC1, constitute the second model grouping. While there are many small differences, most of
the parts are interchangeable within this group.

In June of 1969 Muncie Gear Works was purchased by Applied Devices Corp of College Point NY. The
outboard business was sold to a former employee and moved to Lehigh Acres Fla. E. Ray Abrams
manufactured the Model 500, and the plastic hooded, Model 700, from the Lehigh Acres address, under the
banner of his Telmar Corporation. It is here that the urban legend originated. &rdquothat the motors were
assembled by Senior citizens&rdquo.

The Model 500 was an updated version of the WC1. This new model had a Tillotson diaphragm carburetor and
the side covers to accommodate that change. Motors have been seen in both gold and the less common
turquoise color. All indications are the Model 500 was made from 1970 to at least 1978. Possible some were
sold later. The Model 700 was also called Mighty Mite. It was a redesign of the same old power head but wore
a plastic hood and had a rewind starter.
The Model 500 and 700 constitute the third parts group. Except for the covers and the rewind assemble most
of the parts are shared between these engines.

Sometime in 1979 the Telmar Corp was sold to a group of investors and the headquarters were moved.
Renamed MIGHTY MITE MARINE, the address appeared as Colton Rd, Old Lyme Ct. The Outboard Motors
were still produced at Lehigh Acres.

Shortly after that, the totally redesigned Model 800 appeared. There were three versions of this engine. The
800A, 800B and the Mighty Mite III. There are slight differences between the three but basically all the parts
interchange. This is an excellent little engine that should have been more successful than it was. American
made, water cooled, and incorporating a neutral clutch and full pivot reverse, these were as good as anything
on the market at that time.

I will save the telling of the OLD LYME Mighty Mite&rsquos story for another article.
But. We believe that there were roughly enough parts produced for 1000 complete Model 800 motors and
that the last ones were assembled no later than January 1987. The company struggled on under the
leadership of the last member of the original group of investors until it was dispersed sometime between 1989
and 1993 or possible a little earlier. No one in the outboard collecting community seems to know what
happened to the dies and the tooling for the Model 800 motors after the company quietly closed its doors for
the last time. Rumor has it that the tooling was worn out and that their US foundry had succumbed to
environmental regulations.

A sad ending for one of America longest running outboard motor marques.


The Real-Life “Jaws” That Terrorized the Jersey Shore

As Americans prepared to celebrate the Fourth of July holiday weekend in 1916, the aptly named resort town of Beach Haven, New Jersey, promised a sanctuary from worries about the war raging in Europe and the polio epidemic sweeping through New York City. Seeking refuge from the sweltering heat gripping his hometown of Philadelphia, Charles Vansant stepped out of his beachfront hotel to take a quick dip in the Atlantic Ocean before dinner on July 1, 1916.

The athletic 25-year-old waded into the shallow surf and swam out from shore with a paddling Chesapeake Bay retriever at his side when a dark fin suddenly sliced through the 3-and-1/2 foot deep water. The sea creature clamped onto Vansant’s left leg and refused to let go. The swimmer unleashed a morbid scream as the ocean’s white breakers turned red. A human chain tried to tug him to safety, but the animal did not unclench its jaws until its belly scraped on the pebbles in the shallow waters near shore. The rescuers carried the badly injured Vansant into the lobby of the luxurious Engleside Hotel where he bled to death.

The attending physician recorded a remarkable cause of death𠅊 shark bite. While swimming in the ocean was still a nascent American pastime in the early 1900s, shark attacks along the coast of New Jersey were unheard of. Many scientists believed sharks to be shy, just another fish that swam offshore and posed no threat to swimmers, and not powerful enough to maul a human. Stories of shark attacks told by ancient mariners were often dismissed as salty tales akin to stories of sea serpents. �thers Need Have No Fear of Sharks,” declared a headline in the Philadelphia Public Ledger in which experts dismissed the attack on Vansant as a freak incident in which the shark was actually trying to attack the dog swimming near the victim.

Five days later, however, terror once again struck from the sea 45 miles north of Beach Haven as Charles Bruder swam out beyond the breakers of Spring Lake, New Jersey. The 27-year-old Swiss bellboy captain at the Essex & Sussex Hotel was taking his regular lunchtime swim when a “man-eater” struck 130 yards from shore and bit off his left leg above the knee and the right leg just below the knee. Lifeguards pulled the maimed Bruder to shore as women fainted at the sight. There was nothing that could be done to save him.

While an assistant curator at New York’s American Museum of Natural History who examined Bruder’s body declared the mutilation the work of a killer whale, others clung to the belief that a giant tuna or great sea turtle must have been the culprit. Some conspiracy theorists believed the attack was the work of a shark—that is a shark trained by the Germans to follow their U-Boats and strike American bathers.

Protective nets were now installed at beaches along the Jersey Shore as boats patrolled the ocean waters, but they proved useless in preventing the next attack, which occurred 25 miles north of Spring Lake on July 12. As the sun beat down on a 96-degree day, Lester Stillwell frolicked with other boys in a popular swimming hole along Matawan Creek. A sympathetic foreman at the basket-weaving factory where the frail 11-year-old worked had taken pity on his overheated employees and given them the afternoon off to cool down. Lester found relief in the brackish water of the placid creek more than a mile inland from where it emptied into Raritan Bay. As the boy floated on his back, a shadow suddenly emerged from the depths. A shark grabbed him by the stomach and pulled him under the water. He briefly surfaced long enough to utter an horrific scream before the shark once again took him under.

Philadelphia Inquirer front page after capture of a shark in 1919.

The rest of the terrified boys ran down Matawan’s Main Street yelling for help. A local tailor, 24-year-old Stanley Fisher, joined the townspeople rushing to the scene and from a rowboat probed the murky waters with a pole. Finding no signs of life, it eventually became clear that the mission had switched from rescue to recovery. When Fisher spotted Lester’s body as the boy’s parents watched from the banks, he dove into the creek, even knowing that a killer shark lurked nearby. As Fisher retrieved the lifeless body, the shark reappeared and tore into his right leg. Dragged to shore by his neighbors who desperately attempted to bandage the wound, Fisher passed away hours later.

Thirty minutes after the attack on Fisher, a shark bit the leg of 12-year-old Joseph Dunn near the mouth of Matawan Creek, but the boy managed to survive. The killer fish became public enemy number one with bounty notices promising a $100 reward “to the person or persons killing the shark believed to be in Matawan Creek.” Revenge-minded mobs wielding spears and pitchforks descended upon the banks of the creek as flotillas of shark hunters took to the water. Posses fired shotguns and tossed sticks of dynamite at any movement they saw in the creek’s muddy waters.

Telegrams and letters poured into the White House from panicked Americans urging the federal government to do something to stop the rogue man-eater. Two days after the attack in Matawan Creek, President Woodrow Wilson convened a cabinet meeting to discuss “the shark horror gripping the New Jersey Coast.” He tasked the treasury secretary to lead a “war on sharks” that included efforts by U.S. Coast Guard cutters and the Bureau of Fisheries to “rout the sea terrors.”

1975 “Jaws” movie poster. (Credit: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty images)

That same morning in a small motorboat off the coast of South Amboy, New Jersey, shark hunter Michael Schleisser spotted a black tail fin in the dragnet he had cast in Raritan Bay and struck the shark repeatedly on the head with a broken oar handle until it no longer moved. Back on land, Schleisser gutted the shark and human bones were reportedly found inside but never conclusively identified. Whether that particular shark was indeed the man-eater was not proven, but no further attacks occurred in New Jersey the rest of the summer.

The relationship between Americans and sharks, however, would never be the same again. No longer seen as benign, sharks were man-eating predators to be feared. Even the most skeptical scientists, as the New York Times reported, “no longer doubted that big fish attack men.” Although author Peter Benchley told the New York Times that the 1916 attacks in New Jersey did not serve as the inspiration for his novel “Jaws,” which was adapted into the 1975 blockbuster film, the parallels of a man-eating shark terrorizing a summer tourist resort are unmistakable.


Contents

The Air Force C-119 and Navy R4Q was initially a redesign of the earlier C-82 Packet, built between 1945 and 1948. The Packet provided service to the Air Force's Tactical Air Command and Military Air Transport Service for nearly nine years during which time its design was found to have several serious problems. All of these were addressed in the C-119.

In contrast to the C-82, the cockpit was moved forward to fit flush with the nose rather than its previous location over the cargo compartment. This resulted in more usable cargo space and larger loads than the C-82 could accommodate. The C-119 also featured more powerful engines, and a wider and stronger airframe. The first C-119 prototype (called the XC-82B) first flew in November 1947, with deliveries of C-119Bs from Fairchild's Hagerstown, Maryland factory beginning in December 1949. [2]

In 1951, Henry J. Kaiser was awarded a contract to assemble additional C-119s at the Kaiser-Frazer automotive factory located in the former B-24 plant at Willow Run Airport in Belleville, Michigan. Initially, the Kaiser-built C-119F differed from the Fairchild aircraft by the use of Wright R-3350-85 Duplex Cyclone engines in place of Fairchild's use of the Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major radial engine. Kaiser built 71 C-119s at Willow Run in 1952 and 1953 (AF Ser. No. 51-8098 to 51-8168) before converting the factory for a planned production of the Chase C-123 that never eventuated. The Kaiser sub-contract was frowned upon by Fairchild, and efforts were made through political channels to stop Kaiser's production, which may have proven successful. Following Kaiser's termination of C-119 production the contract for the C-123 was instead awarded to Fairchild. Most Kaiser-built aircraft were issued to the U.S. Marine Corps as R4Qs, with several later turned over to the South Vietnamese air force in the 1970s.

The AC-119G "Shadow" gunship variant was fitted with four six-barrel 7.62 mm (0.300 in) NATO miniguns, armor plating, flare launchers, and night-capable infrared equipment. Like the AC-130 that preceded it, the AC-119 proved to be a potent weapon. The AC-119 was made more deadly by the introduction of the AC-119K "Stinger" version, which featured the addition of two General Electric M61 Vulcan 20 mm (0.79 in) cannon, improved avionics, and two underwing-mounted General Electric J85-GE-17 turbojet engines, adding nearly 6,000 lbf (27 kN) of thrust.

Other major variants included the EC-119J, used for satellite tracking, and the YC-119H Skyvan prototype, with larger wings and tail.

In civilian use, many C-119s feature the "Jet-Pack" modification, which incorporates a 3,400 lbf (15,000 N) Westinghouse J34 turbojet engine in a nacelle above the fuselage.

Production Edit

Number built: 1,183 consisting of:

Two additional airframes were built by Fairchild for static tests

The aircraft saw extensive action during the Korean War as a troop and equipment transport. In July 1950, four C-119s were sent to FEAF for service tests. [ citation needed ] Two months later, the C-119 deployed with the 314th Troop Carrier Group and served in Korea throughout the war. [3]

In December 1950, after People's Republic of China Expeditionary People's Volunteer Army troops blew up a bridge [N 1] at a narrow point on the evacuation route between Koto-ri and Hungnam, blocking the withdrawal of U.N. forces, eight U.S. Air Force C-119 Flying Boxcars flown by the 314th Troop Carrier Group. [5] [N 2] were used to drop portable bridge sections by parachute. The bridge, consisting of eight separate sixteen-foot long, 2,900-pound sections, was dropped one section at a time, using two parachutes on each section. Four of these sections, together with additional wooden extensions were successfully reassembled into a replacement bridge by Marine Corps combat engineers and the US Army 58th Engineer Treadway Bridge Company, enabling U.N. forces to reach Hungnam.

From 1951 to 1962, C-119C, F and G models served with U.S. Air Forces in Europe (USAFE) and Far East Air Forces (FEAF) as the first-line Combat Cargo units, and did yeoman work as freight haulers with the 60th Troop Carrier Wing, the 317th Troop Carrier Wing and the 465th Troop Carrier Wing in Europe, based first in Germany and then in France with roughly 150 aircraft operating anywhere from Greenland to India. A similar number of aircraft served in the Pacific and the Far East. In 1958, the 317th absorbed the 465th, and transitioned to the C-130s, but the units of the former 60th Troop Carrier Wing, the 10th, 11th and 12th Troop Carrier Squadrons, continued to fly C-119s until 1962, the last non-Air Force Reserve and non-Air National Guard operational units to fly the "Boxcars."

The USAF Strategic Air Command had C-119 Flying Boxcars in service from 1955 to 1973.

Perhaps the most remarkable use of the C-119 was the aerial recovery of balloons, UAVs, and even satellites. The first use of this technique was in 1955, when C-119s were used to recover Ryan AQM-34 Firebee unmanned targets. [6] The 456th Troop Carrier Wing, which was attached to the Strategic Air Command (SAC) from 25 April 1955 – 26 May 1956, used C-119s to retrieve instrument packages from high-altitude reconnaissance balloons. C-119s from the 6593rd Test Squadron based at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii performed several aerial recoveries of film-return capsules during the early years of the Corona spy satellite program. On 19 August 1960, the recovery by a C-119 of film from the Corona mission code-named Discoverer 14 was the first successful recovery of film from an orbiting satellite and the first aerial recovery of an object returning from Earth orbit. [7]

The C-119 went on to see extensive service in French Indochina, beginning in 1953 with aircraft secretly loaned by the CIA to French forces for troop support. These aircraft were generally flown in French markings by American CIA pilots often accompanied by French officers and support staff. The C-119 was to play a major role during the siege at Dien Bien Phu, where they flew into increasingly heavy fire while dropping supplies to the besieged French forces. [8] The only two American pilot casualties of the siege at Dien Bien Phu were James B. McGovern Jr. and Wallace A. Buford. Both pilots, together with a French crew member, were killed in early June, 1954, when their C-119, while making an artillery drop, was hit and crippled by Viet Minh anti-aircraft fire the aircraft then flew an additional 75 miles (121 km) into Laos before it crashed.

During the Sino-Indian War of 1962, the C-119 was extensively used to supply Indian forces. President Kennedy allowed sales of spare C-119 on a priority basis upon request by the Indian government.

During the Vietnam War, the incredible success of the Douglas AC-47 Spooky but limitations of the size and carrying capacity of the plane led the USAF to develop a larger plane to carry more surveillance gear, weaponry, and ammunition, the AC-130 Spectre. However, due to the strong demands of C-130s for cargo use there were not enough Hercules frames to provide Spectres for operations against the enemy. The USAF filled the gap by converting C-119s into AC-119s each equipped with four 7.62 minigun pods, a Xenon searchlight, night observation sight, flare launcher, fire control computer and TRW fire control safety display to prevent incidents of friendly fire. The new AC-119 squadron was given the call-sign "Creep" that launched a wave of indignation that led the Air Force to change the name to "Shadow" on 1 December 1968. [9] C-119Gs were modified as AC-119G Shadows and AC-119K Stingers. They were used successfully in both close air support missions in South Vietnam and interdiction missions against trucks and supplies along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. All the AC-119G Gunships were transferred to the Republic of Vietnam Air Force starting in 1970 as the American forces began to be withdrawn.

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Air National Guard and USAF Reserve pilots flew C-119's to drop parachutist students for the US Army Parachute School at Ft. Benning, Georgia.

After retirement from active duty, substantial numbers of C-119s and R4Qs soldiered on in the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, the Air Force Reserve and the Air National Guard until the mid-1970s, the R4Qs also being redesignated as C-119s in 1962. The last military use of the C-119 by the United States ended in 1974 when a single squadron of Navy Reserve C-119s based at Naval Air Facility Detroit/Selfridge Air National Guard Base near Detroit, Michigan, and two squadrons based at Naval Air Station Los Alamitos, California replaced their C-119s with newer aircraft.

Many C-119s were provided to other nations as part of the Military Assistance Program, including Belgium, Brazil, Ethiopia, India, Italy, Jordan, Taiwan, and (as previously mentioned) South Vietnam. The type was also used by the Royal Canadian Air Force, and by the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps under the designation R4Q until 1962 when they were also redesignated as C-119.


USS Neptune (AC-8)

The third USS Neptune (AC–8), a collier of the U.S. Navy, was laid down by the Maryland Steel Co., Sparrows Point, Md. 23 March 1910 launched 21 January 1911 and placed in service with a merchant crew at Norfolk Navy Yard 20 September 1911, Master F. E. Horton, Naval Auxiliary Service, in command.

Except for a period out of service at Norfolk Navy Yard 6 May to 5 December 1912, Neptune operated along the east coast and in the Caribbean from Boston to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, supporting ships and installations of the Atlantic Fleet into 1913. Continuing her replenishment operations, she made two coaling voyages to Vera Cruz, Mexico in the spring and summer of 1913, returned to Norfolk 8 September, decommissioned there 13 October, and was placed in reserve.

Neptune commissioned with a naval complement 7 December 1914 and resumed collier service with the Atlantic Fleet. Assigned to the Auxiliary Division, Atlantic Fleet 28 December 1915, she continued this duty into 1917, making four voyages to Santo Domingo between June 1916 and February 1917, carrying Marines, fuel and mail to support Navy and Marine Corps Units protecting American interests in the Dominican Republic during unrest there.

When the United States entered World War I, Neptune was at Baltimore, Maryland, loading a general cargo. Departing that port, she put into Norfolk to embark a division of the 1st Aeronautical Detachment and sailed 25 May 1917 for France escorted by destroyers USS Jarvis (DD-38) and USS Perkins (DD–26). Arriving St. Nazaire on 8 June, the ship offloaded her cargo and disembarked her troops, the first American forces to land in Europe for service against the enemy. Neptune sailed for home 28 June, arriving New York 11 July and again resumed service with the Train, Atlantic Fleet, making one voyage to the Caribbean, 12 July to 27 August, and then operated off the Atlantic Coast, delivering coal to ports in Chesapeake Bay through the end of the war.

In 1919, following three voyages to Guantanamo Bay to supply naval forces at the training base there, the collier departed Norfolk 3 October for the Pacific, calling en route at the Panama Canal Zone, Nicaraugua, and Honduras with Marines and cargo and arriving San Diego on the 20th. She then operated along the West Coast, coaling ships and supplying naval bases between Bremerton, Washington, and San Diego. Returning to the east coast the way she came, the collier arrived Norfolk 20 January 1920. Neptune made another coaling voyage to the west coast before departing Philadelphia 27 August for an eleven month cruise as part of the Train, Pacific Fleet. She visited Pearl Harbor 8 September to 25 October and cruised to Valparaiso, Chile in January and February 1921 to coal units of the Battle Force engaged in maneuvers off the Chilean coast. The collier returned to Norfolk 11 July and made one more voyage to the West Coast 23 July to 30 December and a coaling cruise to the Caribbean, 25 January to 3 April 1922 before decommissioning at Boston 28 June.

Towed by tugs USS Kalmia (AT–23) and USS Wandank (AT–26), Neptune departed Boston 14 December on her last voyage, arriving Philadelphia three days later. There the ship remained, in reserve, until struck from the Navy List 14 May 1938 and sold for scrapping to Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia 18 April 1939.

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.


Search Term Record

Muncie Gear Works Corporation was founded in Muncie, Indiana about 1910. They took over a failing, two year old business named "Muncie High Wheel Auto Parts Company". One of many, auto parts stores that sprung up in the early days of the automobile.

The The first president of Muncie Gear Works was H.L. Warner and he was later succeeded by T.W. Warner. Both men would become well know for their association with Warner Gear Division of Borg Warner and Warner Machine Products, a subsidiary of Essex International.

The company rapidly grew over the next ten years manufacturing Clutches and Transmissions for the automobile industry. With the growing amount of time required to manage Muncie Gear, the Warner's left the company to attend to their other business interest. Dr. William A Spurgeon became the new president. He was replaced by his son Kenneth A Spurgeon in the early 1920's, who remained president until his death in 1967.

Through the 1920's Muncie Gear Works continued to sell their transmissions to companies like International Trucks and the Ford Motor Company. By the late 20's the business climate was on the decline with changes in the automobile industry, the stock market crash in 1929 and the depression to follow.

Unlike so many other companies of the period, Muncie Gear Works adapted and survived. Some of the product they manufactured are as follows: Transmissions for potato diggers, Automatic Coal Stokers, Heat Pumps, Air Conditioners, Commercial Deep freezers and more.

They got into the outboard motor business in 1930 building a 2hp opposed twin, then in 1938 they copied the popular single cylinder 1.2 hp Evinrude Scout motor.

Muncie Gear Works, made motors under many brands such as Muncie, Neptune, Sea Gull, Skipper, Mighty Mite and also Sea King brand for Montgomery Wards, as well as the Motorgo and Waterwitch brands for Sears Roebuck and Company.

Employment grew again through the late sixties, with Muncie Gear being a major supplier of rocket parts to the Army, for the Viet Nam conflict. In June of 1969 Muncie Gear Works was purchased by Applied Devices Corp of College Point, New York.

From this modest beginning came a line of outboard motors that spanned almost 60 years. In 1938 they produced the first of what would, many years later, evolve into the popular Neptune Mighty Mite.

This little engine was a carbon copy of the Evinrude Scout motor that had sold so well the previous year. It was designated as the 1A38 or 138A model, and was rated at 1.2 hp. The same motor was produced, almost unchanged, as the 1A39 or 139A in 1939. In 1940 the horsepower and bore were increased to 1.5hp, with the introduction of the 10A1, and the 11A1 in 1941. The 15A1 of 1945/46 was 1.5 hp as well. This group of engines was the first of the MIGHTY MITE style motors. They are easily distinguished by their spark plug, which was mounted on the starboard side of the cylinder head. With the exception of the piston and cylinder bore, almost all the parts were interchangeable within this first group.

Business continued to grow over the next ten years, but their outboard motor line took a back seat when World War II broke out. During the war they manufactured 37mm gun carriages, aircraft parts, rocket parts and a outboard drive for barges that would be the for-runner of the inboard/outboard of today.

After the war in 1947 the motors were increased to 1.7 hp with the introduction of the 17A1 model. It was the first of the series to have the rear facing spark plug. The first appearance of the name MIGHTY MITE does not come into use until the introduction of the AA1A in 1956/57. Until that year they were called the Junior Singles.

The Muncie Gear Works was heavily involved in military parts production during the Korean War. No outboards, at all, were produced during the years 1952 and 1953. When the outboard line was restarted in 1954, only the AA1 and some A1 leftovers were made and sold. Reportedly they were also under threat of a major lawsuit from OMC. Their 1948-51 larger models were way too close in appearance to those of the best selling Johnson outboards of that period.

In 1956 Muncie moved the air conditioning and heat pump division to Cordele Georgia. The outboard motor production was moved with them. From that time on, all Muncie’s outboard motors were made at Cordele. The 17A1 and A1 motors were light green with red decals. The AA1 and AA1-A motors were silver with maroon fuel tanks. The decals read "Neptune", although the sales literature called them "Mighty Mite" from 1957-59.

Starting in 1960 and continuing thru 1969 the most common Mighty Mite, was made at Cordele. It was designated the WC1 and is commonly know as the "Gold Bug" or "Gold Fish" motor. The entire motor was painted gold and the fuel tank was squared off at the back. The previous models all had pointed or heart shaped tanks. This motor carried the "Mighty Mite" decal. There seems to have been thousands and thousands of them made, but no one has ever been able to come up with exact production figures. The 17A1, A1, AA1A and WC1, constitute the second model grouping. While there are many small differences, most of the parts are interchangeable within this group.

In June of 1969 Muncie Gear Works was purchased by Applied Devices Corp of College Point NY. The outboard business was sold to a former employee and moved to Lehigh Acres Fla. E. Ray Abrams manufactured the Model 500, and the plastic hooded, Model 700, from the Lehigh Acres address, under the banner of his Telmar Corporation. It is here that the urban legend originated. "that the motors were assembled by Senior citizens".

The Model 500 was an updated version of the WC1. This new model had a Tillotson diaphragm carburetor and the side covers to accommodate that change. Motors have been seen in both gold and the less common turquoise color. All indications are the Model 500 was made from 1970 to at least 1978. Possible some were sold later. The Model 700 was also called Mighty Mite. It was a redesign of the same old power head but wore a plastic hood and had a rewind starter. The Model 500 and 700 constitute the third parts group. Except for the covers and the rewind assemble most of the parts are shared between these engines.

Sometime in 1979 the Telmar Corp was sold to a group of investors and the headquarters were moved. Renamed MIGHTY MITE MARINE, the address appeared as Colton Rd, Old Lyme Ct. The Outboard Motors were still produced at Lehigh Acres.

Shortly after that, the totally redesigned Model 800 appeared. There were three versions of this engine. The 800A, 800B and the Mighty Mite III. There are slight differences between the three but basically all the parts interchange. This is an excellent little engine that should have been more successful than it was.American made, water cooled, and incorporating a neutral clutch and full pivot reverse, these were as good as anything on the market at that time.

It is believed that there were roughly enough parts produced for 1000 complete Model 800 motors and that the last ones were assembled no later than January 1987. The company struggled on under the leadership of the last member of the original group of investors until it was dispersed sometime between 1989 and 1993 or possible a little earlier. No one in the outboard collecting community seems to know what happened to the dies and the tooling for the Model 800 motors after the company quietly closed its doors for the last time. Rumor has it that the tooling was worn out and that their US foundry had succumbed to environmental regulations.

Information added by LeeRoy Wisner
From what information that can be pieced together the following is close to the year/model for this style of the single cylinder motors which later became known as the "Mighty Mite". There were others made prior to this date, but they were of a different style or twin cylinder motors. You may notice some correlation between the model numbers & the year of manufacture up until 1942 during WWII & then a carry over in 1946 with the models again resuming this in 1947. Then there was a carry over of model numbers into years some later years. From 1948 on was a different story. I have not been able to track down any serial numbers however.

1936-37 OB-11, 12,
1938 2A38
1939 2A39, 10A2
1940 10A2, 11B2
1941 10A2, 11A2, 11B2
1946 11A2, 11B2, 14B2
1947 17A1, 17B1, 17B2
1948-55 A1, A2, AA1, AA2, B1
1956 AA1
1957 AA1-A
1961-69 WC-1
1970 500
1978 700
1980-86 800, 800B, Mighty Mite III


USS Neptune (AC-8)

From Wikipedia the free encyclopedia

The third USS Neptune (AC–8), a collier of the U.S. Navy, was laid down by the Maryland Steel Co., Sparrows Point, Md. 23 March 1910 launched 21 January 1911 and placed in service with a merchant crew at Norfolk Navy Yard 20 September 1911, Master F. E. Horton, Naval Auxiliary Service, in command.

Except for a period out of service at Norfolk Navy Yard 6 May to 5 December 1912, Neptune operated along the east coast and in the Caribbean from Boston to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, supporting ships and installations of the Atlantic Fleet into 1913. Continuing her replenishment operations, she made two coaling voyages to Vera Cruz, Mexico in the spring and summer of 1913, returned to Norfolk 8 September, decommissioned there 13 October, and was placed in reserve.

Neptune commissioned with a naval complement 7 December 1914 and resumed collier service with the Atlantic Fleet. Assigned to the Auxiliary Division, Atlantic Fleet on 28 December 1915, she continued this duty into 1917. She made four voyages to Santo Domingo between June 1916 and February 1917, carrying Marines, fuel and mail to support Navy and Marine Corps Units protecting American interests in the Dominican Republic during unrest there.

When the United States entered World War I, Neptune was at Baltimore, Maryland, loading general cargo. Departing that port, she put into Norfolk to embark a division of the 1st Aeronautical Detachment and sailed 25 May 1917 for France escorted by destroyers Jarvis and Perkins. Arriving at St. Nazaire on 8 June, the ship offloaded her cargo and disembarked her troops, the first American forces to land in Europe for service against the enemy. Neptune sailed for home 28 June, arriving at New York on 11 July. The vessel again resumed service with the Train, Atlantic Fleet, making one voyage to the Caribbean, 12 July to 27 August, and then operated off the Atlantic Coast, delivering coal to ports in Chesapeake Bay through the end of the war.

In 1919, following three voyages to Guantanamo Bay to supply naval forces at the training base there, the collier departed Norfolk on 3 October for the Pacific, calling en route at the Panama Canal Zone, Nicaragua, and Honduras with Marines and cargo and arriving at San Diego on the 20 October. She then operated along the West Coast, coaling ships and supplying naval bases between Bremerton, Washington, and San Diego. Returning to the east coast the way she came, the collier arrived at Norfolk on 20 January 1920. Neptune made another coaling voyage to the west coast before departing Philadelphia on 27 August for an eleven-month cruise as part of the Train, Pacific Fleet. She visited Pearl Harbor from 8 September to 25 October and cruised to Valparaiso, Chile in January and February 1921 to coal units of the Battle Force engaged in maneuvers off the Chilean coast. The collier returned to Norfolk 11 July and made one more voyage to the West Coast from 23 July to 30 December and a coaling cruise to the Caribbean, 25 January to 3 April 1922 before decommissioning at Boston on 28 June 1922.

Towed by tugs Kalmia and Wandank, Neptune departed Boston 14 December on her last voyage, arriving at Philadelphia three days later. There the ship remained in reserve, until struck from the Navy List 14 May 1938 and sold for scrapping to Northern Metals Co., Philadelphia 18 April 1939.


Kramer Guitars Info

If the serial number of your Kramer starts with the following serial numbers, it is NOT a USA Made or "American" series Kramer:

1) Two letters followed by a serial number (e.g. AA1234, AC1234, FA1234, FC1234, SA1234)

2) One letter followed by five letters (e.g. b12345) The only exception to this would be some of the "E" series neckplates did have one letter followed by five letters (e.g. e12345).

3) Five numbers, no letters (e.g. 12345)

4) Model numbers preceding serial number (e.g. XL-1234)

5) A chrome or black neck plate with nothing on it but a Kramer headstock and a serial number stamped on them. These neck plates are smooth flat neck plates with no "Neptune, N.J." stamped on them

Keep in mind that just because the neckplate is imprinted with "Kramer, Neptune, NJ" does NOT mean that the guitar was Made in the USA or an "American" series. Kramer was very careful to not stamp "Made In USA" anywhere on its neckplates starting in about 1985/1986.

Starting in late 1985, virtually all Kramer guitars were being made by ESP Guitars in Japan. Although the "American" Series guitars were made by ESP in Japan, they were assembled in the US. In general, the following is a good way to determine if your Kramer is USA made or an "American" series:

  • If your Kramer has a Strat or Classic headstock and has a Kramer logo with a capital "K" followed by a lower caser "ramer", the guitar is an early 1981-1984 USA made Kramer guitar.
  • If your guitar has a banana headstock and a block style Kramer logo in all caps "KRAMER", it is a 1984-1986 USA Made/American Series Kramer Guitar.
  • If your guitar has a pointy headstock and a block style Kramer logo in the same sized lettering in all caps, it is a 1986/1987 American Series Kramer Guitar.
  • If your guitar has a pointy headstock and a diminishing sized Kramer logo with the letters diminishing in size from the K to the R and, there is a script "American" decal after the "KRAMER" logo, it is a 1987-1994 American Series Kramer Guitar.
  • If your guitar has a pointy headstock and a diminishing sized Kramer logo but does not have "American" in script after the logo, it is NOT an American series guitar.

The following wood neck guitar models were the ONLY Made in USA or "American" Series guitars:

  • Baretta Series, Pacer Series, Stagemaster Series, Vanguard Series, Voyager Series, Classic Series, ProAx Series, NightSwan Series, Ripley Series, Spector Series, Paul Dean Series, Richie Sambora Series, Triax, Enterprize, Elliot Easton Series, Sustainer Series, Liberty Series, & Condor Series.

The following wood neck guitar models were NOT Made in USA or "American" Series guitars. These guitars were made either in Korea, Indonesia, or Japan.

  • Striker Series, Focus Series, Hundred Series (e.g. 410, 610), Thousand Series, XL Series, Aerostar Series, Showster Series, and Ferrington Series. Furthermore, the Gorky Park special edition model is also an overseas made guitar.

Another good way to tell if your Kramer is an overseas made model is if it is made out of plywood or composite wood. Also, if your Kramer has "non-name" pickups or "Designed by Seymour Duncan" pickups, it is an overseas model. Finally, if your Kramer came with a Floyd Rose II, Floyd Rose with no fine tuners, or a Floyd Rose unit that does not require the ball ends of the strings to be cut off, it is an overseas model.

Oh yeah, If you bought your Kramer from Music Yo' you can be sure it is a low cost Korean instrument. Please don't confuse any product that comes from Music Yo' with the original.


Treating stage I breast cancer

These breast cancers are still relatively small and either have not spread to the lymph nodes or have spread to only a tiny area in the sentinel lymph node (the first lymph node to which cancer is likely to spread).

Local therapy (surgery and radiation therapy)

Surgery is the main treatment for stage I breast cancer. These cancers can be treated with either breast-conserving surgery (BCS sometimes called lumpectomy or partial mastectomy) or mastectomy. The nearby lymph nodes will also need to be checked, either with a sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or an axillary lymph node dissection (ALND).

In some cases, breast reconstruction can be done at the same time as the surgery to remove the cancer. But if you will need radiation therapy after surgery, it is better to wait to get reconstruction until after the radiation is complete.

If BCS is done, radiation therapy is usually given after surgery to lower the chance of the cancer coming back in the breast and to also help people live longer.

In a separate group, women who are at least 70 years old may consider BCS without radiation therapy if ALL of the following are true:

  • The tumor was 2 cm (a little less than 1 inch) or less across and it has been removed completely.
  • None of the lymph nodes removed contained cancer.
  • The cancer is ER-positive or PR-positive, and hormone therapy is given.

Radiation therapy in this set of women still lowers the chance of the cancer coming back, but it has not been shown to help them live longer.

If mastectomy is done, radiation therapy is less likely to be needed, but it might be given depending on the details of your specific cancer. You should discuss if you need radiation treatment with your doctor. They may send you to a doctor who specializes in radiation (a radiation oncologist) for evaluation.

Neoadjuvant and adjuvant systemic therapy (chemo and other drugs)

For women who have a hormone receptor-positive (ER-positive or PR-positive) breast cancer, most doctors will recommend hormone therapy (tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor, or one followed by the other) as an adjuvant (additional) treatment, no matter how small the tumor is. Women with tumors larger than 0.5 cm (about ¼ inch) across may be more likely to benefit from it. Hormone therapy is typically given for at least 5 years.

If the tumor is larger than 1 cm (about ½ inch) across, chemo after surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy) is sometimes recommended. A woman's age when she is diagnosed may help in deciding if chemo should be offered or not. Some doctors may suggest chemo for smaller tumors as well, especially if they have any unfavorable features (a cancer that is growing fast hormone receptor-negative, HER2-positive or having a high score on a gene panel such as Oncotype DX).

After surgery, some women with HER2-positive cancers will be treated with trastuzumab (with or without pertuzumab) for up to 1 year.

Many women with HER2-positive cancers will be treated with trastuzumab (with or without pertuzumab) followed by surgery and more trastuzumab (with or without pertuzumab) for up to 1 year. If after neoadjuvant therapy, residual cancer is found during surgery, trastuzumab may be changed to a different drug, called ado-trastuzumab emtansine, which is given every 3 weeks for 13 doses. If hormone receptor-positive cancer is found in the lymph nodes, your doctor might recommend one year of trastuzumab followed by additional treatment with an oral drug called neratinib for 1 year.


HALES, or LODDEN-HALES,

Bigot's Manor.

By some accounted to be in Loddon-hundred. There were at the survey several lordships in this town: Roger Bigot, ancestor to the Earls of Nofolk, had a grant of one, which Alestan (a thane of King Harold) was deprived of to this there belonged one carucate of land, and 40 acres with 9 bordarers, and 2 carucates in demean, one among the tenants, and 5 acres of meadow, paunage for 3 swine, one runcus, one cow, &c. and 10 sheep. There were also 13 freemen belonging to the lord's fold, and under his commendation with 40 acres of land, valued at 20s. but at the survey at 40s. this Alestan put himself under the commendation of Alwin de Tedford, in the reign of King William, and was seised of it at the time when the Conqueror gave it to Roger Bigot. But the hundred never saw any writ or livery, whereby it was granted to Alwin. All Hales was fifteen furlongs long, and 12 perches and six furlongs broad and pays 8d. gelt. (fn. 1)

This lordship extended into Loddon, and was held by the Bigots Earls of Norfolk, and by the grant of Roger Bigot Earl of Norfolk, who died s. p. it came to King Edward I. and was given by King Edward II. to his brother, Thomas de Brotherton Earl of Norfolk, and so came to the Lord Segrave, the Mowbrays, and the Howards Dukes of Norfolk.

On the attainder of Thomas Duke of Norfolk, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, it was in the Crown, and King James I. on June 17, ao. 1, bestowed it on Thomas Lord Howard, of Walden, and Henry Howard, afterwards Earl of Northampton, from whom it passed to Thomas Howard Earl of Surry, who in the 21 of the said King, April 1, had license to alien it to Anthony Hobart, Esq. and his heirs Anthony conveyed it in the same year to James Hobart, his son and heir, who, by deed, dated Sep. 12, ao. 12 of Charles I. sold it to Henry Humberston Esq. son of William Humberston, of Loddon by Joan, his wife, daughter of John Smith, of Lanham in Suffolk, which William was son of John Humberston of Loddon.

Henry had 2 wives: by Mary, daughter of Henry Yaxley of Beauthorp, Esq. his 2d wife, he had no issue by his first wife Anne, daughter of Giles Bladwell, Esq. of Thorlow Magna, in Suffolk, was father of William Humberstone, Esq. who married Mildred, daughter of Charles Walgrave of Stanninghall in Norfolk, Esq. who conveyed this manor to Francis Gardiner, Esq. mayor of Norwich in 1685, (son of Francis Gardiner D. D. vicar of Kendal,) and burgess in parliament for that city, in 1695. Stephen Gardiner, Esq. his son, was recorder of Norwich, and died in 1727. Gardiner, bore, gules a chevron, between three griffins heads erased, or.

Ralph Lord Baynard was rewarded with a lordship, of which Toke, a freeman (of Stigand, the Archbishop of Canterbury) of French extraction, was deprived consisting of 30 acres of land, 3 villains, with a carucate and 3 acres of meadow, &c. and 60 sheep there were 12 freemen under his protection, and of his fold who held 41 acres of land, with a carucate and a half, and 3 acres of meadow: there were also 2 freemen under his protection only, with 18 acres, of land and half a carucate, also one freeman with 30 acres one, borderer and one carucate, and one acre of meadow the whole valued at 17s. but at the survey at 30s. (fn. 2)

A family who took their name from this town, was early enfeoffed of it, and held it under the Lord Baynard. Roger de Hales and William, his son, were living in the reign of Henry II.—Walter de Hales, in the time of King John and Sir Roger, son of Walter, in the 34 of Henry III. John, son of Sir Roger, in the 22 of Edward I. which Sir Roger, by deed, sans date, confirmed the exchange of lands (between 2 persons) that were held of his fee in Hales which shows that it was the custom for lords of manors to confirm the purchases, before the statute of Quia Emplores, &c. and sealed with barry of 12, azure and or, on a canton, gules, a lion passant. Sir John de Hales was living, ao. 20 Edward III. and by Catherine, (after married to Roger de Wellesham,) was father of John de Hales, who died s. p. ao. 43 Edward III. and held this lordship of the barony of Fitz-Walter.

In the 17 of Richard II. William, son of Edmund de Redesham of Kirkby Caam, conveyed by fine, to Sir Robert de Willoughby, Sir Miles Stapleton, John, son of Sir John de Norwich, &c. the manor of HalesHall in Loddon, one messuage, 4 carucates of land, 24 acres of meadow, 2 of wood, 20 of marsh, and 100s. rent, in Hales, Loddon, Kirkeby, with the advowson of Hales-Hall chapel, purchased by John de Norwich in reversion Sir George Felbrigg of Tottington, holding two parts of the manor and lands, in right (as I take it) of the widow of Edmund de Reedisham, then his wife, and Joan, widow of John de Hales, holding a 3d part in dower. (fn. 3)

Sir Simon Felbrigg, in the 12th of Henry IV. recovered the manor of Hales-Hall by writ of Novel Disseisin, against John Hotot, and held his first court on Tuesday next after the assumption of the blessed Virgin, and it was after settled on his two feoffees, Sir John Howard, and Sir John de Ingaldesthorp, &c.

In the 19th of Henry VI. Nicholas Waleys and John Pewk, were querents in a fine, and Henry Walpole, and Margaret his wife, deforciants of 10l. rent, per ann. in Loddon-Hales manor, conveyed to Pewk and in the 30th of that King, Hugh Croke, vicar of Hale, was a trustee of Thomas Cleymonds, Esq. deceased, late lord.

After this, it was possessed by Sir James Hobart, attorney-general, and of the privy council to King Henry VII. of whom, and his ancestors, see in Plumstede Parva, in Blofield hundred. His benefactions and good works, testify his charity and generosity he resided in his manor-house here, which he built for the most part, (and died here,) with the elegant parish church of the Holy Trinity, at Loddon also a fair bridge over the Waveney river, between Norfolk and Suffolk, called St. Olaves, or Tooley's bridge, with a good causeway to it (fn. 4) contributed to the rebuilding of the council chamber in the Guild-Hall of the city of Norwich, and to the noble arched stone roof of the cathedral church of Norwich. Sir Walter Hobart was his son and heir, and lord of this manor sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, ao. 1, Henry VIII. in the 20 of that King, he settled this lordship, with that of Chatgrave, Lille ford's, Tilney in Norfolk, and others in Suffolk, as may be seen in Chatgrave, Loddon hundred, on Walter Hobart, Esq. his son and heir. A pedigree of the eldest branch of the family I have here annexed.

James Hobart, Esq. sold it in the 12 of Charles I. to Henry Humberstone, Esq. (as is mentioned in Bigot's manor above,) whose son William, is said to have conveyed part of it to Francis Gardiner, Esq. and part to the Lady Dionysia Williamson, relict of Sir Thomas Williamson, Baronet, of Markham Magna in Nottinghamshire, daughter and heir of William Hales, Esq. son of Richard Hales, Esq. who was lady of this manor of Hales-Hall, in 1666, and resided here she gave 4000l. to the rebuilding the church of St. Dunstan in the East, of London to the rebuilding of St. Paul's cathedral, 2001l. and was a benefactress to the rebuilding of the church of St. Mary Le Bow, in London, giving 2000l. and at her death, left Hales-Hall to John Hoskins, Esq. her nephew, (who was lord in 1687,) with the impropriated rectory of Loddon.

The abbot of St. Edmund of Bury, had a lordship which Frodo held of them at the survey 9 men, 2 of them were socmen, and 7 more, belonged to the abbot's lordship, and were under his protection only, held 64 acres in King Edward's reign, when there were 2 borderers and 5 freemen, with 6 acres this was valued with Loddon. (fn. 5)

Frodo, also, held of the abbot one acre, of which 2 freemen were deprived valued at 4d. (fn. 6) Of this Frodo, &c. see in Loddon, which manor extended also into this town.

Godric, the King's steward, held one acre and a half, out of which a freeman was ejected: this was granted to Godric on the forfeiture of Ralph Earl of Norfolk, who had a moiety (as lord) of this freeman. (fn. 7)

The tenths were 2l. 10s. Deducted 10s. Temporalities of St. Olaves 8d. and of Langley abbey 24s.

The Church of Hales was a rectory, but granted in the 4th of Henry I. by Ralph de Chedgrave, and Emma his wife, to William, prior of St. Olaves, probably founder of that priory and a vicar was appointed on its appropriation to that convent. It was dedicated to St. Margaret, and it appears by the register of Langley abbey, that the prior and convent of St. Olaves at Hering flete in Suffolk were rectors of Hale, and had the tithe of 235 acres of land in Hale parish belonging to Langley abbey, in exchange for 235 acres of land in Loddon and Heckingham, belonging to the priory of St. Olaves. (fn. 8)

In the reign of Edward I. the rectory was valued at 11 marks, and the vicarage at 40s. The vicar had then a manse with 30 acres of land. Peter-pence 18d. Carvage 12d. 0b.

Vicars.

In 1317, Adam de Blofield was instituted vicar, presented by the prior of St. Olaves, and nominated by the Bishop of Norwich.

1326, John de Carlethorp. Ditto.

1333, Roger de Petengraunt. Ditto.

1366, William Warren. Ditto.

1366, John Stalworth. Ditto.

1377, Peter de Wynch. Ditto.

1382, John Wandeford. Ditto.

1398, Richard Bytering. Ditto.

1403, Richard Bangoot. Ditto.

1413, William Norwich. Ditto.

In 1458, Hugh Croke occurs vicar.

In 1503, I find it served by a stipendiary curate, for 5l. per ann. and he then returned 45 communicants, John Hill being the impropriator and in 1742, the heirs of Mr. Peter Lawes.

Here was also a chapel at Hales-Hall, belonging to the manor of the family of De Hales, dedicated to St. Andrew: this, with the hall, stood in the parish of Loddon, and in 1287, it is said to stand in the manor of Wrantishagh, belonging to Sir Roger de Hales, in Loddon parish, and leave was then granted to him, that he might institute the chaplains of it, by the concession and grant of the abbot of Langley, rectors of the church of Loddon, and of John de Feryby, official to William, Bishop of Norwich, the said Sir Roger and his heirs granting to the chaplains all the obventions and oblations, with the small tithes of his court, and that the servant, of him and his heirs having their habitations in the parish of Loddon, shall pay to the mother church of Loddon, the oblations accustomed, and shall receive the sacraments there. (fn. 9) And the chaplains administering in the said chapel, were to pay yearly to the said mother church, in acknowledgment of subjection, all the oblations and obventions given on Easter-day, and St. Andrew's day, and two wax candles of a pound of wax, on Trinity Sunday, and to give security to the vicars of Loddon, for the time being, that they should not say any anniversaries, trentals, or any masses for any parishioners of Loddon.

In 1331, Sir John de Hales was patron, and in 1349 and John, son and heir of Sir John, in 1361.

Alexander de Hales, styled Doctor Irrefragabilis, who died in 1245, was born here. Hales, Halesworth, Halestead, Alesham and Aylesford, so called, as near to some river or water.


Watch the video: Neptune Thelisis Neptune Okeanis (October 2022).

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