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No. 99 Squadron (RAF): Second World War

No. 99 Squadron (RAF): Second World War


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No. 99 Squadron (RAF) during the Second World War

Aircraft - Locations - Group and Duty - Books

No. 99 Squadron (Madras Presidency) spent most of the Second World War operating the Vickers Wellington, first from Britain and later from India, where it eventually converted to the Liberator.

For the first few months of the war the squadron was engaged in leaflet dropping flights over Germany. Bombing operations began in April 1940, after the German invasion of Norway. The squadron continued to perform bombing operations from Britain until 14 January 1942.

The squadron was then transferred to India. It would take five months for the unit to come together again, at Ambala, and another five months before it began operations, conducting night raids on Japanese targets in Burma.

The squadron finally lost its Wellingtons in September 1944, when they were replaced by long range Liberator VIs. During the first half of 1945 they operated these aircraft from Dhubalia (Bengal), before moving to Cocos Island in preparation for the planned invasion of Malaya. The Japanese surrender meant that this invasion never happened, and the squadron disbanded on 15 November 1945 on the Cocos Island (reforming two days later at Lyneham in Yorkshire as a transport squadron).

Aircraft
October 1938-October 1942: Vickers Wellington I, IA and IC
October 1942-November 1943: Vickers Wellington III
June 1943-September 1944: Vickers Wellington X
October 1943-December 1943: Vickers Wellington XI
September 1944-November 1945: Liberator VI

Location
15 November 1934-9 September 1939: Mildenhall
9-15 September 1939: Elmdon
14 September 1939-18 March 1941: Newmarket
18 March 1941-February 1942: Waterbeach
February 1942: Departs for India
6 June 1942: Ground echelons reach Ambala
19 September-25 October 1942: Pandaveswar
25 October 1942-12 April 1943: Digri
12 April-23 May 1943: Chaklala
23 May 1943-26 September 1944: Jessore
26 September 1944-14 July 1944: Dhubalia
29 July-15 November 1945: Cocos Island

Squadron Codes:

Group and Duty
26 September 1939: Bomber squadron with No. 3 Group

Books


Traces of World War 2 RAF - No. 99 Squadron 10/05/1940 - 30/06/1940

On 8 September 1939, No 99 Squadron entered WW II with the first of many leaflet-dropping missions over Germany. The first bombing raids were launched on 17 April 1940 during the German invasion of Norway. European bombing operations continued until January 1942 when the Squadron was deployed to India.

Operations and losses 10/05/1940 - 30/06/1940
Not all operations listed those with losses are.

10-11/05/1940, Waalhaven, NL
15-16/05/1940: Maastricht, NL
21-22/05/1940: Dinant, B. 1 Plane lost, 6 KIA
29-30/05/1940: St-Omer, F. 3 Planes lost, 1 KIA
11-12/06/1940: Operation Haddock (called off)

19-20/06/1940: Ruhr, D. 1 Plane lost

Fatalities 01/01/1940 - 09/05/1940 (in progress)

Pilot Officer (Pilot) John N. Carter, RAF 72448, 99 Sqdn., age 19, 03/03/1940, West Row Baptist Churchyard, UK
Aircraftman 1st Class (W. Op.) Peter W. Corvan, RAF 549742, 99 Sqdn., age 19, 03/03/1940, West Row Baptist Churchyard, UK
Leading Aircraftman James C. Forster, RAF 524766, 99 Sqdn., age 27, 03/03/1940, Newmarket Cemetery, UK
Aircraftman 2nd Class (W. Op.) Frank Hart, RAF 631366, 99 Sqdn., age unknown, 03/03/1940, Wath-upon-Dearne Cemetery, UK
Sergeant (Obs.) Arthur K. Saxon, RAF 581022, 99 Sqdn., age 27, 03/03/1940, West Row Baptist Chapelyard, UK
Pilot Officer (Pilot) Alexander Stewart, RAF 70819, 99 Sqdn., age unknown, 03/03/1940, Dalziel (Airbles) Cemetery, UK

Aircraftman 1st Class John Booth, RAF 630373, 99 Sqdn., age 19, 18/04/1940, missing
Corporal Robert S. Bryson, RAF 524310, 99 Sqdn., age 22, 18/04/1940, missing
Leading Aircraftman Francis A.B. Haynes, RAF 610705, 99 Sqdn., age 19, 18/04/1940, missing
Pilot Officer John G.C. Salmond, RAF 33476, 99 Sqdn., age 20, 18/04/1940, missing
Flying Officer Abraham F. Smith, RAF 39346 (South Africa), 99 Sqdn., age 26, 18/04/1940, missing
Sergeant Edward H. Williams, RAF 580927, 99 Sqdn., age 20, 18/04/1940, missing

Flight Sergeant (Pilot) John W.L.G. Brent, RAF 355953, 99 Sqdn., age 35, 01/05/1940, Plumstead Cemetery, UK
Sergeant (Obs.) Peter C. Cunningham, RAF 580784, 99 Sqdn., age 22, 01/05/1940, Edlesborough (St. Mary) Churchyard, UK
Aircraftman 1st Class (W. Op./Air Gnr.) Donald Lilley, RAF 631565, 99 Sqdn., age 19, 01/05/1940, Alverthorpe (St. Paul) Churchyard, UK
Flying Officer (Pilot) Herbert G. Muller, RAF 39558, 99 Sqdn., age 28, 01/05/1940, Richmond Cemetery, Surrey, UK
Aircraftman 1st Class (W.Op./Air Gnr.) Michael J. O'Sullivan, RAF 621221 (Ireland), 99 Sqdn., age 20, 01/05/1940, West Row Baptist Churchyard, UK
Pilot Officer (Air Gnr.) Gerard A.H. Poole, RAFVR 76015, 99 Sqdn., age 31, 01/05/1940, Southend-on-Sea (Sutton Road) Cemetery, UK

10-11/05/1940: Waalhaven, NL

- 6 Wellingtons No.9 Sq. Afb. Honington [S/L Peacock]
- 3 Wellingtons No.37 Sq. Afb. Marham [jointly with 75 Sq., S/L Glencross]
- 6 Wellingtons No.38 Sq. Afb. Marham [F/L MacFadden]
- 3 Wellingtons No.75 [NZ] Sq. Afb. Feltwell [jointly with 37 Sq., S/L Glencross]
- 6 Wellingtons No.99 Sq. Afb Newmarket [S/L Bertram]
- 6 Wellingtons No.115 Sq. Afb. Marham [unknown]
- 6 Wellingtons No.149 Sq. Afb. Mildenhall [S/L Harrie]

15-16/05/1940: Maastricht, NL

Six Wellington Mk.I medium bombers of No.99 squadron from Newmarket. Hits [on the bridges?] were reported. All planes returned safely.

21-22/05/1940: Dinant, B

Type: Wellington 1C
Serial number: L7803, LN-?
Operation: Dinant
Lost: 22/05/1940
Flying Officer (Pilot) John P. Dyer, RAF 39073 (Canada), DFC, 99 Sqdn., age 27, 22/05/1940, Belval Communal Cemetery, F
Flying Officer (Pilot) Owen L. Williams, RAF 39091, 99 Sqdn., age unknown, 22/05/1940, Belval Communal Cemetery, F
Sergeant (Obs.) John H. Lawrenson, RAF 580791, 99 Sqdn., age unknown, 22/05/1940, Belval Communal Cemetery, F
Leading Aircraftman (Air Gnr.) Charles R.A. Lovejoy, RAF 518071, 99 Sqdn., age 26, 22/05/1940, Belval Communal Cemetery, F
Aircraftman 1st Class (W. Op. Air) Edward Morton, RAF 629523, 99 Sqdn., age unknown, 22/05/1940, Belval Communal Cemetery, F
Aircraftman 1st Class (W. Op. Air) Stanley C. Ogilvie, RAF 632492, 99 Sqdn., age 21, 22/05/1940, Belval Communal Cemetery, F

Airborne 2120 21May40 from Newmarket. Crashed near Belval (Ardennes), 6 km WNW of Charleville-Mezieres, France.


29-30/05/1940: St-Omer, F

Type: Wellington Mk. IC
Serial number: P9282, LN-P
Operation: St-Omer
Lost: 30/05/1940
Airborne 2130 29/05/1940 from Newmarket. Ran out of fuel on the return and abandoned 0300 30May40 near Chrishall, 6 miles WNW of Saffron Walden, Essex. P/O J. Brain Crew names not appended.

Type: Wellington Mk. IC
Serial number: R3196, LN-?
Operation: St-Omer
Lost: 30/05/1940
Airborne 2130 29/05/1940 from Newmarket. Abandoned 0315 30May40 short of fuel, at Brettenham, 3 miles E of Thetford, Norfolk. Two injuries reported. P/O C.J.A.C. Brain [?] No crew names appended.

Type: Wellington Mk. IC
Serial number: P9241, LN-?
Operation: St-Omer
Lost: 30/05/1940
Pilot Officer (Pilot) James C. Young, RAF 41094, 99 Sqdn., age 25, 30/05/1940, New Shildon (All Saints) Churchyard, UK
Other names of crewmembers unknown.
Airborne 2130 29May40 from Newmarket. Crew ordered to bale out after running low on fuel. The pilot then force-landed 0300 30May40 at Kilverstone Hall, Thetford, Norfolk. One member of the crew was killed and another injured.

11-12/06/1940: Operation Haddock

Unsuccessful attack by 99 Squadron and 149 Squadron RAF on Genoa and Turin by Wellingtons based in France June 1940

Prior to the Italian declaration of war, the British and French governments had jointly agreed that in the eventuality of Italy joining forces with Germany, the Allies would commence air operations against her. Thus a force of bombers code-named 'Haddock Force' was created, comprising Wellingtons from Nos. 99 and 149 Squadrons of 3 Group. 'Haddock Force' was to be based on the French airfields at Salon and Le Vallon, to which an advance party had been despatched on June 7th. On the morning of June 11th, the Wellingtons of No. 99 Squadron arrived at Salon where they were immediately refuelled and bombed-up for a raid on Italian industrial targets that night. However the local French Air Force commander, backed up by a deputation from local authorities were aware that the Italians had already bombed Cannes and Nice that morning. They were fearful of possible Italian attacks in retaliation and objected to such a raid. Despite protests from the RAF commander that they had the approval of the French government and the personal intervention of Churchill to the French Premier Reynaud, the local authorities refused to budge. As the Wellingtons began to taxi out the airfield was blocked by French Army trucks and other vehicles. In order to prevent a clash the raid was called off and the Wellingtons ordered back to England to prevent sabotage by the French.

The RAF had taken out insurance by moving 4 Group (10, 51, 58, 77 and 102 Sqdns.) Whitleys to the Channel Islands. The aircraft took off from the small airfields at Jersey and Guernsey bound for the Fiat aero-engine works at Turin and the Ansaldo factories at Genoa as the alternative. Electrical storms of great severity hampered the force and caused twenty crews to abort.


No 99 Squadron RAF

Badge: A puma salient. The puma in No.99 Squadron’s badge has a double significance: the squadron once flew aircraft equipped with Puma engines and the animal signifies independence and tenacity of purpose.

Squadron History:

No. 99 Squadron, RFC, was formed at Yatesbury, Wiltshire, on 15th August 1917, from a nucleus provided by No. 13 Training Squadron, and went overseas in April 1918, equipped with DH9s. The squadron was posted to the bombing force which in June 1918, became known as the Independent Force and, until the Armistice, was engaged on long-distance day-bombing raids into Germany in the course of these raids it suffered very heavy casualties.

No. 99 Squadron made its first raid on 21st May from Tantonville airfield, which it shared with No. 55 Squadron. On 16th July twelve of No. 99’s DH9s, followed by six of No. 55’s DH4s, attacked the railway station at Thionville. A large number of bombs was dropped and great damage caused when an ammunition train received two direct hits and exploded, setting off a whole chain of explosions with shells flying in all directions. This was one of the most successful British bombing raids of the war. On 31st July, nine aircraft of No. 99 Squadron, en route to Mainz, encountered about 40 hostile fighters and four bombers were shot down. The remaining five continued as far as Saarbrücken and bombed the railway station but the German fighters kept up their attack and another DH9 crashed near the centre of the town. On the return journey two more DH9s were shot down. The enemy, however, did not escape scot free, for one of the surviving pilots said in his report of the operation: “We…accounted for eight enemy scouts definitely known to have crashed.”

In September the squadron began to re-equip with the DH9A, but it was not fully re-equipped with this type until after the Armistice.

During its six months of war service No. 99 Squadron made 76 raids and dropped a total of more than 61 tons of bombs. Of the number of aircraft starting on raids, 79 per cent succeeded in reaching and bombing their objectives, a notable figure considering the distance flown over hostile territory and the overwhelming opposition put up by the enemy against daylight raids – not to mention the unreliability of the DH9’s Puma engine. Twenty-one DH9s were lost to enemy action. The squadron destroyed twelve enemy aircraft and shot down seven out of control while engaged on long-distance raids.

After the war No. 99 Squadron was engaged for a while on air mail duties fu Europe. Then, in May 1919, it left its base in France for India where it was subsequently engaged in the Mahsud and Waziristan operations on the North-West Frontier. In April 1920, it was re-numbered No.27 Squadron.

In April 1924, No. 99 was re-formed at Netheravon as a twin-engined-bomber squadron. It was equipped successively with Vimys, Aldershots, Hyderabads, Hinaidis and Heyfords and at the start of the Second World War was flying Wellingtons from Newmarket. (It was actually based at Mildenhall at that time but was using Newmarket as a dispersal area.) In common with other Wellington squadrons of Bomber Command, No. 99 was engaged for a while on armed searches for German Naval units in the North Sea, and Nickel (leaflet-dropping) raids, but by 1941 there was steady bombing of naval and industrial targets. The Scharnhorst and Gneisenau – or “Salmon” and “Gluckstein” as the bomber crews dubbed them – were, of course, included.

During the early part of 1942 the squadron moved to India and in November of that year began to operate against the Japanese in Burma.

Sgt Goodman and Crew of R Robert

R Robert at Newmarket 1941

From November 1940 until March 1941, Flight Sergeant Goodman was with 99 squadron at Newmarket, flying from the racecourse, at that time the longest runway in Bomber Command, and living in the grandstand during the bitter winter of 1940/41. The pictures above show his Wellington, R for Robert at dispersal and, second from the left, as skipper with his crew. While there, he had an encounter with a Dornier which had just laid a stick of bombs along Newmarket high street. For this engagement, he was awarded half a victory perhaps the only incidence of a Wellington being used as a fighter…

There was another event which was to resonate many years later when a replacement crew took R Robert on a raid to Germany. Running short of fuel and encountering thick fog over East Anglia, they baled out, leaving the Wellington to fly on and crash in the Fens. In September 1982, an aircraft preservation society found the plane and Group Captain Goodman was able to visit the site. A propeller blade from the aircraft now forms part of a permanent memorial to the crews of 99 squadron outside Newmarket racecourse.

On finishing his tour, Flight Sergeant Goodman was tasked to take a Wellington to the Middle East, flying a non-stop flight of 11 hours 30 minutes. Once there, instead of returning to the UK as a pilot screened from operations, the mounting losses meant that he had to rejoin the battle, operating from desert airstrips over Libya and Crete. A costly series of raids, which reduced the Squadron to a shadow of what it had been. The Nissen hut in which he and his crew were billeted emptied twice over before Crete was overrun.


Traces of World War 2 RAF - No. 149 Squadron 10/05/1940 - 30/06/1940

On 12 April 1937 B Flight of No. 99 Squadron, at Mildenhall, equipped with Handley Page Heyfords, was expanded to squadron strength and given No.149's number plate. This was during the rushed expansion of the RAF to be ready for the war that was clearly imminent. Before World War 2 broke out the squadron had re-equipped with Vickers Wellington Mk Is, and was operational on 4 September 1939, flying a raid on warships at Brunsbuttel. It was soon found that the Wellington was unsuitable for daylight raids, and there was little for No.149 to do for the rest of the 'phoney war' apart from 'Nickel' leaflet raids over Germany at night.

It was when the German offensive in the Low Countries began in May 1940 that the squadron began the bombing offensive against Germany which occupied it for the rest of the war. The Wellington was soon found to be the best of the British bombers, 50 No.149 and the other No.3 Group squadrons were busily involved, at first in tactical bombing to try to halt the German advance on the British troops evacuating from Dunkirk, then against the invasion barges massing at the Channel ports. But the squadron was really meant for strategic bombing and it was this task, principally against the Ruhr, on which No.149 concentrated during the winter of 1940-1. During the long winter nights it was able to fly farther afield, and included Berlin and the industries of northern Italy in its targets.

Operations and losses 10/05/1940 - 30/06/1940
Not all operations listed those with fatalities are.

10-11/05/1940: Waalhaven, NL
19/05/1940: ?, 1 DOW (?)
23-24/05/1940: Battle Area
, F. 1 Plane lost, 3 KIA
10-11/06/1940: Soissons, F. 1 Plane lost, 6 MIA
11/06/1940: ground, UK. 1 KIA
11-12/06/1940: Operation Haddock

back up

Fatalities 01/01/1940 - 09/05/1940 (in progress)

Type: Wellington I
Serial number: N2943, OJ-?
Operation: Reconnaissance
Lost: 02/01/1940
Flying Officer Hugh L.M. Bulloch, RAF 37788, 149 Sqdn, age unknown, 02/01/1940, missing
Sergeant Robert Ballantyne, RAF 580780, 149 Sqdn, age 20, 02/01/1940, missing
Sergeant Donald J. Kirkness, RAF 565269, 149 Sqdn, age unknown, 02/01/1940, missing
Leading Aircraftman Walter Greig, RAF 532679, DFM, 149 Sqdn, age 23, 02/01/1940, missing
Leading Aircraftman Aldewin A. Brown, RAF 551008, 149 Sqdn, age 20, 02/01/1940, missing
Aircraftman 2nd Class Denis H. Grove, RAF 629162, 149 Sqdn, age 19, 02/01/1940, missing
Took off from Mildenhall. Shot down by a Me 110 in position 54°27' N 05°47' E. The Wellington was seen to be on fire as it hit the sea. The crew are commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.

Type: Wellington I
Serial number: N2946, OJ-?
Operation: Reconnaissance
Lost: 02/01/1940
Aircraftman 2nd Class Douglas J. Drury, RAF 625339, 149 Sqdn, age 21, 02/01/1940, missing
Aircraftman 2nd Class Aubrey Hinchliffe, RAF 610120, 149 Sqdn, age 19, 02/01/1940, missing
Sergeant William H.C. Kidd, RAF 563851, 149 Sqdn, age 27, 02/01/1940, missing
Leading Aircraftman Albert J. Mantle, RAF 521552, 149 Sqdn, age 24, 02/01/1940, missing
Sergeant John Morrice, RAF 580290, 149 Sqdn, age 28, 02/01/1940, missing
Sergeant Harry R.B. Wakeham, RAF 149 Sqdn., 149 Sqdn, age 26, 02/01/1940, missing

18/01/1940: Ground accident, UK

Aircraftman 2nd Class William A. Colebourne, RAF 627020, 149 Sqdn, age 23, 18/01/1940, Derby (Nottingham Road) Cemetery, UK.
Hit by prop of Wellington N2944.

Sources: CWGC and RAF Commands Forum: 149 & 199 Squadrons

Flying Officer (Pilot) Leo R. Field, RAF 37346, 149 Sqdn., age 22, 02/03/1940, Brighton (Lewes Road) Borough Cemetery, UK
Aircraftman 2nd Class (W. Op./Air Gnr.) Laurence B. Hughson, RAF 621199, 149 Sqdn., age 22, 02/03/1940, Lerwick New Cemetery, UK
Sergeant (Obs.) James C. Murdoch, RAF 580799, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 02/03/1940, Troon Cemetery, Ayrshire, UK
Leading Aircraftman Ernest H. Prior, RAF 546726, 149 Sqdn., age 22, 02/03/1940, Waterbeach Cemetery, UK
Aircraftman 2nd Class (Air Gnr.) Thomas E. Smith, RAF 626998, 149 Sqdn., age 18, 02/03/1940, Dunbar Cemetery, UK
Sergeant (Pilot) Maurice Wiffen, RAF 580312, 149 Sqdn., age 29, 02/03/1940, Braintree and Bocking (Braintree) Cemetery, UK

Flying Officer (Pilot) Jack P.M. Hewett, RAF 39878, 149 Sqdn., age 30, 04/04/1940, West Row Baptist Churchyard, UK

Aircraftman 2nd Class (W. Op.) Leonard F. Foster, RAF 630009, 149 Sqdn., age 32, 05/04/1940, West Row Baptist Churchyard, UK

Leading Aircraftman Richards Coalter, RAF 616989, 149 Sqdn., age 19, 12/04/1940, missing
Aircraftman 1st Class Edmund B. Doherty, RAF 627157, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 12/04/1940, missing
Aircraftman 2nd Class Harry Gillott, RAF 623761, 149 Sqdn., age 23, 12/04/1940, missing
Sergeant (Pilot) Geoffrey E. Goad, RAF 563876, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 12/04/1940, Trondheim (Stavne) Cemetery, UK
Aircraftman 2nd Class James Henry, RAF 630142, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 12/04/1940, missing
Corporal Jack H. Langridge, RNZAF 37156, 149 Sqdn., age 21, 12/04/1940, missing
Sergeant William C. Parker, RAF 580804, 149 Sqdn., age 26, 12/04/1940, missing
Aircraftman 2nd Class Frederick Tootle, RAF 625665, 149 Sqdn., age 19, 12/04/1940, Falnes Churchyard, Norway
Sergeant Roy F. Vickery, RAF 530080, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 12/04/1940, missing
Sergeant (Pilot) Laurie C. Wakeling, RAFVR 740420, 149 Sqdn., age 23, 12/04/1940, Falnes Churchyard, Norway
Sergeant Horace J. Wheller, RAF 562377, 149 Sqdn., age 29, 12/04/1940, missing
Sergeant Frederick A. Woodcock, RAF 564824, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 12/04/1940, missing

21/04/1940: Wellington IA P9218
F/O (Pilot) F.T.Knight - POW
AC2 (wireless operator) James J.Eldridge - POW
Sgt W.G.McDonald - POW
Sgt G.E.Forsyth - POW
AC2 Blackburn and AC1 W.J.Thew - POW
See: Airwar over Denmark, Wellington IA P9218


10-11/05/1940: Waalhaven, NL

- 6 Wellingtons No.9 Sq. Afb. Honington [S/L Peacock]
- 3 Wellingtons No.37 Sq. Afb. Marham [jointly with 75 Sq., S/L Glencross]
- 6 Wellingtons No.38 Sq. Afb. Marham [F/L MacFadden]
- 3 Wellingtons No.75 [NZ] Sq. Afb. Feltwell [jointly with 37 Sq., S/L Glencross]
- 6 Wellingtons No.99 Sq. Afb Newmarket [S/L Bertram]
- 6 Wellingtons No.115 Sq. Afb. Marham [unknown]
- 6 Wellingtons No.149 Sq. Afb. Mildenhall [S/L Harrie]

Aircraftman 2nd Class Leslie T. Newcombe, RAFVR 702680, 149 Sqdn., age 21, 19/05/1940, Ilkeston (Park) Cemetery, UK
Died of wounds?

23-24/05/1940: Battle Area

Type: Wellington Mk.1C
Serial number: P9270, OJ-G
Operation: Battle Area
Lost: 24/05/1940
Flight Lieutenant (Pilot) Ian D. Grant-Crawford, RAF 37501, 149 Sqdn., age 28, 24/05/1940, West Row Baptist Chapelyard, UK
F/O Holdsworth Inj
Sgt Mundell Inj
Aircraftman 1st Class Edgar S. Hewitt, RAF 547085, 149 Sqdn., age 22, 24/05/1940, Skegness (St. Clement) Churchyard, UK
Aircraftman 2nd Class (W. Op.) John Burton, RAF 627969, 149 Sqdn., age 22, 24/05/1940, West Row Baptist Chapelyard, UK
AC1 Crook Inj
Airborne 2230 23May40 to provide tactical support in the battle area. Crashed (cause not established) near Barton Mills, Suffolk, as the crew prepared to land. On 'Lost bombers' Aircraftman 1st Class Edgar S. Hewitt spelt as 'E. Hewett'.

Sources: CWGC W.R. Chorley, Bomber Command Losses of the Second World War, Volume 1, 1939/40

back up
10-11/06/1940: Soissons, F

Type: Wellington Mk.1C
Serial number: L7800, OJ-?
Operation: Soissons
Lost: 24/05/1940
Flying Officer John S. Douglas-Cooper, RAF 37964, 149 Sqdn., age 31, 11/06/1940, missing
Pilot Officer Michael B. Dawson, RAF 42205, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 11/06/1940, missing
Sergeant Geoffrey B. Fleming, RAF 581173, 149 Sqdn., age 24, 11/06/1940, missing
Sergeant Robert Donaldson, RAF 542626, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 11/06/1940, missing
Sergeant Michael Murphy, RAF 624178, 149 Sqdn., age 23, 11/06/1940, missing
Pilot Officer John R. Swift, RAFVR 77213, 149 Sqdn., age unknown, 11/06/1940, missing
Airborne from Mildenhall. Last heard calling for a fix which was plotted off the Belgian coast. Presumed crashed in the sea. They are all commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial.

Sources: CWGC W.R. Chorley, Bomber Command Losses of the Second World War, Volume 1, 1939/40

back up 11/06/1940: ground, UK

Aircraftman 2nd Class Anthony F. Moss, RAF 552152, 149 Sqdn., age 18, 11/06/1940, Stockton-on-Tees (Oxbridge Lane) Cemetery, UK
Killed in accident on airbase?

11-12/06/1940: Operation Haddock

Unsuccessful attack by 99 Squadron and 149 Sqdn. on Genoa and Turin by Wellingtons based in France June 1940

Prior to the Italian declaration of war, the British and French governments had jointly agreed that in the eventuality of Italy joining forces with Germany, the Allies would commence air operations against her. Thus a force of bombers code-named 'Haddock Force' was created, comprising Wellingtons from Nos. 99 and 149 Squadrons of 3 Group. 'Haddock Force' was to be based on the French airfields at Salon and Le Vallon, to which an advance party had been despatched on June 7th. On the morning of June 11th, the Wellingtons of No. 99 Squadron arrived at Salon where they were immediately refuelled and bombed-up for a raid on Italian industrial targets that night. However the local French Air Force commander, backed up by a deputation from local authorities were aware that the Italians had already bombed Cannes and Nice that morning. They were fearful of possible Italian attacks in retaliation and objected to such a raid. Despite protests from the RAF commander that they had the approval of the French government and the personal intervention of Churchill to the French Premier Reynaud, the local authorities refused to budge. As the Wellingtons began to taxi out the airfield was blocked by French Army trucks and other vehicles. In order to prevent a clash the raid was called off and the Wellingtons ordered back to England to prevent sabotage by the French.

The RAF had taken out insurance by moving 4 Group (10, 51, 58, 77 and 102 Sqdns.) Whitleys to the Channel Islands. The aircraft took off from the small airfields at Jersey and Guernsey bound for the Fiat aero-engine works at Turin and the Ansaldo factories at Genoa as the alternative. Electrical storms of great severity hampered the force and caused twenty crews to abort.


No.1 Squadron, Indian Air Force

No.1 Squadron, Indian Air Force had only arrived in the Imphal valley on 3 rd February 1944. Led by the dashing 25 year old Commanding Officer, Squadron Leader Arjan Singh, the unit had previously been spending time in watch and war duties at Kohat Air Field on the North Western Frontier. Arjan Singh had taken over command on 3 rd September 1943. He had been the flight commander of A Flight for at least a year before that.

A month after his taking over command, RAF Kohat was visited by a delegation of senior RAF Officers – Air Marshal Baldwin, Air Commodore Hunter AOC 223 Group and Gp Capt Proud, the IG, IAF. It was during the visit of Air Marshal Baldwin, that Arjan Singh approached the Station Commander Wing Commander Mukerjee with a request. It has been nearly two years since the Squadron had withdrawn from their first tour of operations in Burma. Arjan made a request that No.1 Squadron be moved to the Burma Front to experience combat once again. Arjan’s enthusiasm paid off, and the Squadron was ordered to move to the Burma Front.

The Squadron at that time was operating the Hawker Hurricane Mk IIB aircraft. The Hurricane was legendary in its role of the defender in the Battle of Britain. It was a capable aircraft in the early years of the war, but by 1944 in Burma, it was no match for the more nimble Japanese fighters. While the initial variants of the Hurricane were armed with eight .303 inch calibre Browning Machine Guns, the Mk IIB operated by No.1 was equipped with twelve Browning Machine guns – six in each wing. It could also carry two 250lb bombs, one under each wing, or an extra set of long range fuel tanks. Both the bombs or the tanks degraded the performance of the aircraft and they would be easy meat if they encountered aerial opposition.


Memories of RAF Waterbeach

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

RAF Waterbeach in 1956

RAF Waterbeach was my first posting after an engine mechs course(piston engines). I remember turning up there on a Friday evening at the beginning of April to hear a parade in full swing. It turned out to be rehearsal for the forthcoming visit of the Duchess Of Kent ? who was going to present the colours to 56 sqd. No prizes for guess ing wwhere I was posted to. They were equipped with Hunter 5's . So having finishing a course on piston engines I was now to work on jet engines.Anyone remember a Cpl Con Roscrow/Roscoe (Enginbe Fitter) from those days.
During my time with the squadron we made a visit to London to see Al Read at the Adelphi - way down the list of acts was a young woman named Shirley Bassey. Returning to camp at 2am on the Sunday monrning we were reminded it was a normal working parade. Would the young airmen of today tolerate it ?. Those were the good old days before the five day week came in after Suez

RAF Waterbeach in 1954

I thought the Duchess of Kent came to Waterbeach earlier than 1956 as that was the year I left. I do remember there was a search in the area for soft pink toilet paper. Dont know if they found any. This visit will be recorded in the museum at the guardroom gate. Well worth a visit

RAF Waterbeach, in 1953

Written by Pete &quotSmudge&quot Smith

1953 wasn’t too bad really. First the floods on the East Coast and we were sent to Felixstowe filling sandbags. A thoroughly soaking experience. Then April was ’volunteered’ for Coronation duties, did some training at Waterbeach but then sent to RAF Odiham for final training. After we were sent to Kensington Gardens, quite near the Round Pond, frequented by "Ladies of the Night" Put under canvas whilst there until route lining duties on the day. Just outside Selfridge’s, quite another wet experience but a memorable one.

RAF Waterbeach, Reforming of 253 sqd in 1954

I was a young Cpl Air Radar fitter when I was postede from the statin staff at Waterbeach to start off 253 sqd that were to be supplied with VENOM NF2a aircraft Initally ther was a Flt Sgt whoes name escapes me and my self with two tressal tables and pads of DEMAND FORMS F 673’s and the equipment scales.About a fortnighr later we were joined by several others posted to the Sqd strength and our Engineering Officer W O Young, closley followed by the C O Wng Cdr Underwood. It was the experiance of a life time to be in at the start. My cell mate when we were operational was a Cpl Keith Birch a three year timer If any members of the sqd are out there give me a shout. I left the unit in 55 to go to the Vulcan V force that was just about to arrive on the scene.

RAF Waterbeach, RAF DUXford in 1954

Written by James Richardson

I remember taking part in the guard of honor on 22nd. October 1954 at RAF Duxford. for the visit of the Emperor of Ethiopia Haile Selassie.



1917 1977

Motto : "Ultor in umbris" ("Avenging in the shadows")
Badge : A nightjar volant affrontée. The nightjar was chosen because it is a bird which is active at night and is indicative of the role of the squadron.
Authority : King George VI, March 1938

Vic Pheasant of the Squadron Association has written a history of the No. 214 (FMS) Squadron Association
Please click on this link to see the document
Posted on 8 June 2021

RAF Scampton Commemorative Stained Glass Window Appeal
RAF Scampton is one of the oldest stations in the UK. It is due to close in 18 months time.
In 1944 the staff at the station numbered 2,112.
The first RAF offensive of WW2 was launched from the station, 6 hours after the declaration of war.
617 squadron was formed at RAF Scampton to carry out the Dambusters raid.
During the war RAF Scampton lost a total of 551 aircrew and 266 aircraft.
As we approach Remembrance Day please consider supporting this meaningful tribute to all who have served at the station during two world wars and the cold war by sponsoring a window pane and dedicating it. #WeWillRememberThem.
We are so grateful for the support that has been given by Carol and John and the 214 Squadron Association and their website posts during this appeal over the last year.
Contact:
[email protected] for further information about sponsorship
https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/rafwindow to donate.
https://www.facebook.com/RafCommemorativeWindow
https://scamptonchurch.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Window-Appeal-Remembrance-2020.mp4
Posted on 30 October 2020


SITE LAST UPDATED

Site last updated 8 June 2021


This site is dedicated to all of the service men and women who served with the No. 214 (FMS) Squadron RAF

we and every future generation will be forever in their debt

"We will remember them"



Remembrance wreath laid in November 2018 on the No. 214 Squadron Memorial at the National Arboretum in Alrewas, Staffordshire

Source : Peter Walker and Anne Chueng


Greetings Visitor

Welcome to the No. 214 (FMS) Squadron RAF Web Site. We hope you will find the site interesting and informative. The main purpose of the site is to bring the veterans and families of 214 Squadron together to ensure that the legacy of our heroes is passed on to our grandchildren, great grandchildren and all future generations of our families to come. The site forged close links with the 214 Squadron Association whose aim was to support and assist veterans and their families in whatever way possible. Sadly the Association has now closed.

Most of the information on the site covers World War 2 and covers the bomber squadron's history, RAF home bases, aircraft, veterans & personnel, numerous squadron photographs, news clippings, military documents / propaganda, war posters, aircraft and crew losses, and a special section on members who became Prisoners of War.

However we are now expanding our records to cover the complete history of the Squadron and it's members (1917 to 1977).

Therefore anyone who served in 214 Squadron throughout it's history should be mentioned.

All squadron veterans, their friends and family members, or any other interested people are invited to help with the building of this site.

All materials or photos sent will be treated with the greatest care, loaded onto the site with the source acknowledged. All electronic sources will be stored carefully.

The site is, and always will be, under development as new information is gathered.

If you find any links that do not work please let us know.

The question "Why are there not more pictures of the squadron and personnel?" has been raised on numerous occasions. The answer is that candid unofficial photos of the squadron are very rare. The reason for this is that cameras were strictly forbidden and this policy was enforced out of the real possibility that the film or camera could fall into enemy hands thereby providing all sorts of clues to assist them that you or I might not consider. You will note that many of those found here are official pictures either sanctioned or taken by the RAF. In fact most people would be surprised to learn that very many Britain based squadron veterans do not have a single photograph, official or otherwise. This however mainly applies to the Squadrons based in Britain where enforcement was easier. It does not hold true with Squadrons based in other countries where often massive personal collections can be found.

All information, pictures and stories on this site, unless otherwise indicated, are the property and copyright of the families of 214 Squadron collectively or of an individual member. We are certain there is very little here that the veterans or their families would not wish to share, but you must seek the contributors or the site administrator's permission first.

The use of any materials from this site for any commercial purpose whatsoever is strictly forbidden.


File:Flight Lieutenant Joe McCarthy (fourth from left) and his crew of No. 617 Squadron (The Dambusters) at RAF Scampton, 22 July 1943. TR1128.jpg

HMSO has declared that the expiry of Crown Copyrights applies worldwide (ref: HMSO Email Reply)
More information.

This tag is designed for use where there may be a need to assert that any enhancements (eg brightness, contrast, colour-matching, sharpening) are in themselves insufficiently creative to generate a new copyright. It can be used where it is unknown whether any enhancements have been made, as well as when the enhancements are clear but insufficient. For known raw unenhanced scans you can use an appropriate <> tag instead. For usage, see Commons:When to use the PD-scan tag.


#1544SIG. Typhoon FGR4 12 Squadron Print Signed

Squadron Prints Lithograph No. 1544 - ZK372, Typhoon FGR4, 12 Squadron, RAF Coningsby.

Signed in Pencil by the current serving RAF Pilots

No 12 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, was formed at Netheravon on 14 February 1915, out of a flight of No 1 Squadron. By April 1915, the Squadron was fully equipped with B.E.2c aircraft and on 6 September, 12 Squadron arrived at St Omer to become Headquarters squadron for long-range reconnaissance. During 1916, the Squadron reequipped with B.E.2e aircraft which were replaced by the R.E.8 during 1917 allowing the Squadron to successfully undertake night bombing duties. By the end of World War I, 12 Squadron had successfully downed 45 enemy aircraft. After the Armistice, the Squadron moved with the Army of Occupation and flew Bristol F.2B Fighters until disbanding at Bickendorf in 1922 as the last operational squadron in Germany. 12 Squadron reformed as a bomber squadron at Northolt in 1923 equipped with D.H.9A aircraft these were soon replaced by Fawns which were then superseded by Fairey Foxes. 12(B) Squadron was the only squadron to operate the Fox which outshone all other aircraft of the time, hence the Squadron motto &lsquoLeads the Field&rsquo and the inclusion of a fox&rsquos mask on the Squadron crest. The Squadron took delivery of Harts then reequipped again with Hinds before moving to Andover in March 1924. Fairey Battles were received in February 1938 and the Squadron took these aircraft to France at the outbreak of World War II. After a short period of heavy losses, the Squadron returned to the United Kingdom where it reequipped with the Vickers Wellington and joined the main force of Bomber Command. Lancasters were received in November 1942 and were retained until the arrival of Lincolns in 1946. The Squadron moved into the jet era with the arrival of Canberra B2 in 1952 and then the B6 in 1955. 12(B) Squadron was disbanded in 1961 to reform in 1962 as part of the expanding V Force, operating the Vulcan B2 from Coningsby prior to being disbanded once more in 1967. The Squadron reformed again at Honington in 1969 as a low-level Maritime Strike Attack Squadron, equipped with the Buccaneer S.2B and moved to Lossiemouth in 1980. In response to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1991, the Squadron deployed to Bahrain and conducted target designation and bombing missions over Iraq. No 12(B) Squadron reequipped with the Tornado GR1 in 1993, retaining its maritime strike commitment but soon began repeated deployments to the Middle East conducting armed reconnaissance missions and enforcing the Iraqi no-fly zones. In 1999, 12(B) Squadron took delivery of the Tornado GR4 and during 2003, spearheaded the RAF&rsquos involvement in the second Gulf Conflict. In 2009, 12(B) Squadron was the first Tornado GR4 squadron to deploy to Afghanistan and successfully conducted the first operational employments of Dual Mode Seeker Brimstone and Paveway IV from the Tornado GR4. In 2011, whilst supporting the enduring Tornado Force commitment in Afghanistan, personnel from 12(B) Squadron were called upon to enforce a no-fly zone over Libya. Crews flew operational reconnaissance and attack missions from both Gioia del Colle, Italy and Marham, United Kingdom. 12(B) Squadron disbanded at Lossiemouth on 31 March 2014. Following the decision to maintain three Tornado GR4 front-line squadrons, 12(B) Squadron reformed at RAF Marham on 9 January 2015. The Squadron deployed to RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus, playing a vital role in the RAF&rsquos contribution to the coalition operating against Islamic State. With the demise of the RAF&rsquos Tornado fleet, the Squadron disbanded on 14 February 2018. Only a few months later, on 24 July 2018, the Squadron was reactivated again as the UK&rsquos seventh frontline Typhoon FGR4 Squadron, returning to RAF Coningsby for the first time since 1967. As well as fulfilling frontline duties such as Quick Reaction Alert of the UK and her dependent territories, 12 Squadron is linked intrinsically with a deal between the Governments of the UK and Qatar to supply the Qatar Emiri Air Force (QEAF) with 24 Typhoon and 9 Hawk aircraft. This sees QEAF air and groundcrew receive training in operating and maintaining the latest version of Typhoon with 12 Squadron as they prepare for the delivery of their own aircraft in 2022. Hence, 12 Squadron is the first &lsquojoint squadron&rsquo the RAF has operated since the Second World War &ndash another first in the Squadron&rsquos distinguished history of &lsquoLeading the Field&rsquo.

Prints may be scuffed or scratched as they have been handed by those signing in their Squadron Crewroom


Watch the video: Δεύτερος Παγκόσμιος Πόλεμος. Η ιστορία προειδοποιεί.. (September 2022).


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