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Evans DE-1023 - History

Evans DE-1023 - History


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Evans III

(DE-1023: dp. 1,270; 1. 314'6", b. 36'9", dr. 9'1";
s. 25 k.; cpl. 170; a. Classified; cl. Evans)

The third Evans (DE-1023) was launched 14 September 1955 by Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Co. Seattle, Wash.; sponsored by Mrs. H. Hendrickson and commissioned 14 June 1967, Lieutenant Commander H. F. Wiley in command

Evans arrived at San Diego, her home port, 4 August 1957, and began shakedown operations along the west coast. Her first lengthy deployment, from 21 January 1958 to 27 June, found her serving with Commander, Naval Forces Marianas, for duty in the administration of Pacific territories held by the United States in trust under the United Nations. She proceeded to visit Japan, Hong Kong, and the Philippines, and to train with ships of the navy of the Republic of Korea.

During her second tour of duty in the Far East from 8 January 1959 to 13 June, Evans hove to in Leyte Gulf 7 February to conduct memorial services for her namesake, Commander Ernest Evans. She exercised with the navy of the Republic of the Philippines, patrolled the Taiwan Straits, served briefly as station ship at Hong Kong, and joined in exercises off Okinawa during the remainder of her tour. On 14 April 1960, Evans again climaxed a west coast training period by sailing for the western Pacific on a tour of duty which continued until 21 July 1960. She then returned to operations off the coast for the remainder of the year.


Llywelyn ap Seisyll

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Royal Family of Gwynedd - The Unofficial "History" of Gruffudd, Nephew of Iago http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id74.html. (Steven Ferry, December 4, 2019.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Royal Family of Gwynedd - Who was Maredudd ap Cynan? http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id47.html. (Steven Ferry, December 17, 2019.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Shropshire Walcot Family - Chart I: The Welsh Walcot Family http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id100.html. (Steven Ferry, April 22, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Shropshire Walcot Family - Chart II: Second Powys Dynasty http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id99.html. (Steven Ferry, May 14, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Shropshire Walcot Family- Chart III: First Powys Dynasty http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id98.html. (Steven Ferry, May 17, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Shropshire Walcot Family - Chart IV: Arwystli Dynasty http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id95.html. (Steven Ferry, May 23, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: What Really Happened in Deheubarth in 1022? http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id216.html. (Steven Ferry, May 28, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The 1039 Battle at Rhyd y Groes http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id211.html. (Steven Ferry, June 3, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Edwin of Tegeingl and His Family - Was Owain ap Edwin Really a Traitor http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id87.html. (Steven Ferry, June 8, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Edwin of Tegeingl and His Family - Uchdryd ap Edwin - the Younger Son http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id86.html. (Steven Ferry, June 11, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Ithel of Bryn in Powys http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id43.html. (Steve Ferry, June 24, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Trahaearn ap Caradog of Arwystli http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id68.html. (Steven Ferry, July 7, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Cadwgan of Nannau http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id66.html. (Steven Ferry, July 16, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Maredudd ap Owain, King of Deheubarth http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id206.html. (Steven Ferry, July 17, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Two Families Headed by a Rhydderch ap Iestyn http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id212.html. (Steven Ferry, July 18, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Era of Llewelyn ap Seisyll http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id207.html. (Steven Ferry, July 19, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Cynfyn ap Gwerystan, the Interim King http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id209.html. (Steven Ferry, July 21, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Consorts and Children of Gruffudd ap Llewelyn http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id210.html. (Steven Ferry, July 22, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott The First Wife of Bleddyn ap Cynfyn http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id148.html. (Steven Ferry, July 23, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Floruit of Einion ap Seisyllt http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id48.html. (Steven Ferry, August 10, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Enigmatic Elystan Glodrydd http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id199.html. (Steven Ferry, August 11, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The Unofficial "History" of Elystan of Powys http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id230.html. (Steven Ferry, August 12, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The "Betrayal" by Meirion Goch Revisited http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id90.html. (Steven Ferry, August 15, 2020.)

Please see Darrel Wolcott: The Family of Trahaearn ap Caradog http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id240.html. (Steven Ferry, August 29, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Ednowain ap Bradwen http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id196.html. (Steven Ferry, September 2, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Three Men Called Iorwerth Goch "ap Maredudd" http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id140.html. (Steven Ferry, September 6, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: The 'Next Heir' of Morgan of Caerleon http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id214.html. (Steven Ferry, September 18, 2020.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Gwyn ap Ednowain Bendew http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id244.html. (Steven Ferry, January 2, 2021)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Bartrum's "Pedigrees of the Welsh Tribal Patriarchs" #29 - Llewelyn Aurdorchog http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id259.html. (Steven Ferry, March 16, 2021.)

Please see Darrell Wolcott: Refugees From Strathclyde Come to Gwynedd http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id269.html. (Steven Ferry, June 8, 2021.)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Llywelyn ap Seisyll (died 1023) was a King of Gwynedd and of Deheubarth in north-west and south-west Wales, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Ulster.

Little is known about Llywelyn's father Seisyll, who may not have been of Royal blood, though Llywelyn's wife Angharad was the daughter of Maredydd ab Owain, who ruled much of both northern and southern Wales for a period.

Llywelyn won control of Gwynedd in 1018 when he defeated Aeddan ap Blegywryd in battle, killing him and his four sons. He later gained control of Deheubarth, defeating Rhain, an Irish pretender who claimed to be the son of Maredudd ab Owain, at Abergwili in 1022.

According to the annals in Brut y Tywysogion, Llywelyn's reign was a period of prosperity, "there was no one needy in his realm, and there was no town empty or deserted". His reign was cut short by his premature death in 1023.

His son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, though still a youth when his father died, was later able to gain control of almost the whole of Wales.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Llywelyn ap Seisyll (died 1023) was a King of Gwynedd and of Deheubarth in north-west and south-west Wales, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Ulster.

Little is known about Llywelyn's father Seisyll, who may not have been of Royal blood. According to some genealogies Siesyll and his son Llywelyn were associated with Rhuddlan, perhaps originally as lords of the Rhuddlan commote in Rhos.[1] Llywelyn's wife Angharad was the daughter of Maredydd ab Owain, who ruled much of both northern and southern Wales for a period.

Llywelyn won control of Gwynedd in 1018 when he defeated Aeddan ap Blegywryd in battle, killing him and his four sons. He later gained control of Deheubarth, defeating Rhain, an Irish pretender who claimed to be the son of Maredudd ab Owain, at Abergwili in 1022.

According to the annals in Brut y Tywysogion, Llywelyn's reign was a period of prosperity, "there was no one needy in his realm, and there was no town empty or deserted". His reign was cut short by his premature death in 1023.

His son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, though still a youth when his father died, was later able to gain control of almost the whole of Wales.

In 1023, Llywelyn ap Seisyll died. It would appear that his son was too young to step into his shoes, and control of Gwynedd returned to the dynasty of Merfyn Frych - Iago ab Idwal ap Meurig. In the same year, Rhydderch ab Iestyn seized control of Deheubarth.

According to the 'Book of Llandaff', Rhydderch was ruling all Wales in about 1025 - Iago only holding Anglesey.

Cynan ap Seisyll, Llywelyn's brother, seemingly mounted an unsuccessful campaign to take control of Gwynedd, since his killing is recorded in 1027. Rhydderch ab Iestyn was killed, by the Irish (the annals do not record the circumstances), in 1033. Rule of Deheubarth reverted to the dynasty of Merfyn Frych - Hywel and Maredudd, sons of Edwin ab Einion. Rhydderch's sons, apparently, succeeded him in Morgannwg, and were clearly not content to lose control of Deheubarth without a contest. The following year (1034), Edwin's sons and Rhydderch's sons fought the battle of Irathwy. Presumably Edwin's sons were victorious (the outcome is not recorded), since Hywel was king of Deheubarth until his death, in 1044. Hywel's brother, Maredudd, however was killed just a year after Irathwy, by "the sons of Cynan" - who may (or may not) be the sons of Cynan ap Seisyll.

In 'The Welsh Kings', Kari Maund suggests that the power-base of Llywelyn and Cynan ap Seisyll was Powys (which had been annexed by Gwynedd almost two hundred years previously). Llywelyn's widow, Angharad, married a nobleman of Powys, Cynfyn ap Gwerystan, and they founded a new royal dynasty (the second dynasty of Powys). Dr. Maund writes of Maredudd's killers: ". most likely they were the sons of Cynan ap Seisyll, with a power-base in Powys, raiding and fighting in the northern borders of Deheubarth and in Ceredigion (control of Ceredigion was to be a long-term goal of the second dynasty of Powys)."

Possibly, having lost Deheubarth, Rhydderch's sons attempted to expand their territory eastwards, since, also in 1035, one of them, Caradog, was killed by the English. In 1039:

". Iago, king of Gwynedd, was slain and Gruffydd, son of Llywelyn, son of Seisyll, governed in his stead: and he, from beginning to end, pursued the Saxons, and the other nations, and killed and destroyed them, and overcame them in a multitude of battles."

John Edward Lloyd (1911). A history of Wales: from the earliest times to the Edwardian conquest. Longmans, Green & Co..

editors: John Edward Lloyd, R.T. Jenkins (1959). The Dictionary of Welsh Biography Down to 1940. Oxford.

born about 0980 Rhuddlan, Flintshire, Wales

born Abt 0940 Of, Gwynedd, Wales

Cynan Ap Seisyll born Abt 0984 Of, Wales died 1027

born Abt 0982 Of, Deheubarth, Wales

married Abt 1058 (more possibly 1008?)

born Abt 1011 Of, Rhuddlan, Flintshire, Wales

biographical and/or anecdotal:

LDS Llywelyn ap Seisyll (died 1023) was a King of Gwynedd and of Deheubarth in north-west and south-west Wales, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Ulster.

Llywelyn won control of Gwynedd in 1018 when he defeated Aeddan ap Blegywryd in battle, killing him and his four sons. He later gained control of Deheubarth, defeating Rhain, an Irish pretender who claimed to be the son of Maredudd ab Owain, at Abergwili in 1022.

According to the annals in Brut y Tywysogion, Llywelyn's reign was a period of prosperity, "there was no one needy in his realm, and there was no town empty or deserted". His reign was cut short by his premature death in 1023.

His son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, though still a youth when his father died, was later able to gain control of almost the whole of Wales.

John Edward Lloyd (1911), A history of Wales: from the earliest times to the Edwardian conquest. Longmans, Green & Co.

John Edward Lloyd and R.T. Jenkins (ed.)(1959). The Dictionary of Welsh Biography Down to 1940. Oxford

Llywelyn ap Seisyll, b. ca. 974 in Rhuddlan, Flintshire, Wales, d. 1023, He became King of Gwynedd, 1005 in Wales, He became King of Deheubarth, 1018 in Wales

Llywelyn ap Seisyll (died 1023) was a King of Gwynedd and of Deheubarth in north-west and south-west Wales, also called King of the Britons by the Annals of Ulster. Also called Llywelyn ap Seisyllt.

Little is known about Llywelyn's father Seisyll, who may not have been of Royal blood. According to some genealogies Siesyll and his son Llywelyn were associated with Rhuddlan, perhaps originally as lords of the Rhuddlan commote in Rhos.[1] Llywelyn's wife Angharad was the daughter of Maredydd ab Owain, who ruled much of both northern and southern Wales for a period.

Llywelyn won control of Gwynedd in 1018 when he defeated Aeddan ap Blegywryd in battle, killing him and his four sons. He later gained control of Deheubarth, defeating Rhain, an Irish pretender who claimed to be the son of Maredudd ab Owain, at Abergwili in 1022.

According to the annals in Brut y Tywysogion, Llywelyn's reign was a period of prosperity, "there was no one needy in his realm, and there was no town empty or deserted".

His son, Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, though still a youth when his father died, was later able to gain control of almost the whole of Wales. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llywelyn_ap_Seisyll Llywelyn ap Seisyll, King of Gwynedd and Deheubarth, married Angharad verch Maredudd o Deheubarth, daughter of Brenin Deheubarth Maredudd ab Owain o Deheubarth in 994, his third cousin once removed.

Llywelyn was King of Gwynedd in Wales between 1005 and 1023.

According to the Chronicle of Ystrad Fflur (1018): "In this year Llywelyn ap Seisyll slew Aeddan ap Blegywryd and his four sons."

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

cousin/html/index.htm ) Source: The book, 'The Oxford History of the British Monarchy'

Llwelyn was aged 14 at the time of his marriage Source: Lloyd, History of the Princes, the Lords Marcher and the Ancient Nobility of Powys Fadog(Vol 1-page68)

MILITARY-Wars & Battles 1015-He asserted his claim to Gwynedd, and led an army against Aeddan ab Blegwryd,and slew him. Source: Lloyd, History of the Princes etc(vol 1-page 68) 1021- An army of Irish Scots under Awlaff, invaded Wales, and were joined by Hywel & Maredudd, sons of Edwin ab Einion. Llwelyn obtained a decisive victory, but fell by the hand of an assassin. Source: Lloyd, History of the Princes etc.(vol 1-page 68)

TITLES Accession to Gwynedd-c1005 Accession to Deheubarth-c1018 Souce: Fryde, Handbook of British Chronology-Pages 50,52. Brenin of Cymru Source: Dwnn's, Heraldic Visitations of Wales(vol2-page107)

He became, by usurpation, Prince of all Wales Source: Dunn's Heraldic Visitations etc (Vol 2-page 99-fn-2) He was a wise administrator who provided great prosperity for his country. Source Lloyd, History of the Princes etc (vol 1-page 68)


An Unwelcomed Surprise

On October 25 th , 1944 just off the coast of Samar 6 escort carriers, 3 destroyers, 4 destroyer escorts and a few hundred aircraft were organized into a task force known as “Taffy 3.” The mission was to hunt submarines, while supporting the ground troops and they were unfortunately armed for just that purpose alone.

Admiral Halsey had taken the bulk of the fleet in pursuit of a decoy laid out by the Japanese. As a result, Taffy 3 wasn’t anticipating and were not prepared to meet a surface engagement of this nature.

Just after dawn on October 25 th , a four-plane antisubmarine patrol would identify what they first thought were American ships until they realized a very unwelcome surprise. The Commander of Taffy 3 couldn’t believe what he was being told and insisted on lower observations for positive identification.

Not only was it an overwhelming Japanese fleet but among the tonnage was the largest battleship any of them had ever seen. The Japanese Battleship Yamato was present and alone it displaced more water than the entire Taffy 3 task force combined. A remarkable fight was heading their way and they had but minutes to prepare. Already in range, the Yamato unleashed its first salvo and the battle began.

USS Johnston.

Instantly, the Japanese firepower began to take its toll on the smaller fleet as the fire began to focus on the American escort carriers. Evans ordered the Johnston to lay down a smoke screen as he zigged and zagged through the water to avoid the incoming fire.

In order to draw fire away from the more vulnerable escort carriers, Evans opened fire on the Japanese fleet and causing his ship to become their primary target as he positioned himself between the carriers.

Yamato near the end of her fitting out.


U.S.S. RADFORD (DD-446/DDE-446)

She was laid down by Federal Shipbuilding of Kearny, New Jersey on October 2, 1941. Launched May 3, 1942 and commissioned on July 22, 1942, she was decommissioned January 17, 1946 due to the end of WW II. Recommissioned October 17, 1949, she was reclassified DDE-446 on March 26, 1949 and then reclassified again, back to DD-446 on June 30, 1962. Eventually, however, RADFORD was decommissioned and stricken from the naval register on November 10, 1969 and sold and broken up for scrap in October of 1970.

Above, a technician on the RADFORD, has hooked up the AN/ASM-103 to QH-50C, DS-1199, to test the avionics. The AN/ASM-103 was designed to be directly connected to AFCS connector on the QH-50 drone and, with the Rotary servo actuator powered up with an auxiliary drive electric motor, analyze the complete avionics and flight control system of the drone and detect problems that needed adjustment. The AN/ASM-103 did this by simulating signals from the ship-based control system and then measured the avionics system response. A complete functional test using this piece of test equipment was required before a flight!


Known issues in this update

System and user certificates might be lost when updating a device from Windows 10, version 1809 or later to a later version of Windows 10. Devices will only be impacted if they have already installed any Latest cumulative update (LCU) released September 16, 2020 or later and then proceed to update to a later version of Windows 10 from media or an installation source which does not have an LCU released October 13, 2020 or later integrated. This primarily happens when managed devices are updated using outdated bundles or media through an update management tool such as Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) or Microsoft Endpoint Configuration Manager. This might also happen when using outdated physical media or ISO images that do not have the latest updates integrated.

Note Devices using Windows Update for Business or that connect directly to Windows Update are not impacted. Any device connecting to Windows Update should always receive the latest versions of the feature update, including the latest LCU, without any extra steps.

If you have already encountered this issue on your device, you can mitigate it within the uninstall window by going back to your previous version of Windows using the instructions here. The uninstall window might be 10 or 30 days depending on the configuration of your environment and the version you’re updating to. You will then need to update to the later version of Windows 10 after the issue is resolved in your environment.

Note Within the uninstall window, you can increase the number of days you have to go back to your previous version of Windows 10 by using the DISM command /Set-OSUninstallWindow. You must make this change before the default uninstall window has lapsed. For more information, see DISM operating system uninstall command-line options.

We are working on a resolution and will provide updated bundles and refreshed media in the coming weeks.

When using the Microsoft Japanese Input Method Editor (IME) to enter Kanji characters in an app that automatically allows the input of Furigana characters, you might not get the correct Furigana characters. You might need to enter the Furigana characters manually.

Note The affected apps are using the ImmGetCompositionString() function.

We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

A small subset of users have reported lower than expected performance in games after installing this update. Most users affected by this issue are running games full screen or borderless windowed modes and using two or more monitors.

This issue is resolved using Known Issue Rollback (KIR). Please note that it might take up to 24 hours for the resolution to propagate automatically to consumer devices and non-managed business devices. Restarting your device might help the resolution apply to your device faster. For enterprise-managed devices that have installed an affected update and encountered this issue, it can be resolved by installing and configuring a special Group Policy.

Note Devices need to be restarted after configuring the special Group Policy. For help, please see How to use Group Policy to deploy a Known Issue Rollback. For general information on using Group Policies, see Group Policy Overview.

After installing this update, 5.1 Dolby Digital audio may play containing a high-pitched noise or squeak in certain apps when using certain audio devices and Windows settings.

Note This issue does not occur when stereo is used.

To mitigate this issue, you can try one or more of the following:

Streaming the video or audio in a web browser or different app, instead of the app affected by this issue.

Enable Spatial sound settings by right clicking or long pressing on the volume icon in the notification area, selecting Spatial sound (Off) and selecting any of the available options.

We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.

Devices with Windows installations created from custom offline media or custom ISO image might have Microsoft Edge Legacy removed by this update, but not automatically replaced by the new Microsoft Edge. This issue is only encountered when custom offline media or ISO images are created by slipstreaming this update into the image without having first installed the standalone servicing stack update (SSU) released March 29, 2021 or later.

Note Devices that connect directly to Windows Update to receive updates are not affected. This includes devices using Windows Update for Business. Any device connecting to Windows Update should always receive the latest versions of the SSU and latest cumulative update (LCU) without any extra steps.

To avoid this issue, be sure to first slipstream the SSU released March 29, 2021 or later into the custom offline media or ISO image before slipstreaming the LCU. To do this with the combined SSU and LCU packages now used for Windows 10, version 20H2 and Windows 10, version 2004, you will need to extract the SSU from the combined package. Use the following steps to extract the using SSU:

Extract the cab from the msu via this command line (using the package for KB5000842 as an example): expand Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.msu /f:Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.cab <destination path>

Extract the SSU from the previously extracted cab via this command line: expand Windows10.0-KB5000842-x64.cab /f:* <destination path>

You will then have the SSU cab, in this example named SSU-19041.903-x64.cab. Slipstream this file into your offline image first, then the LCU.

If you have already encountered this issue by installing the OS using affected custom media, you can mitigate it by directly installing the new Microsoft Edge. If you need to broadly deploy the new Microsoft Edge for business, see Download and deploy Microsoft Edge for business

After installing this update or later, the news and interests button in the Windows taskbar might have blurry text on certain display configurations.

We are working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.


NATIVE AMERICAN INDIANS AWARDED THE U.S. MEDAL OF HONOR

In the 20th century, at least eight American Indians have been among those warriors to be distinguished by receiving the United States' highest military honor: the Medal of Honor. Given for military heroism "above and beyond the call of duty," these warriors exhibited extraordinary bravery in the face of the enemy and, in two cases, made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

Woodrow W. Keeble (Sioux)

Master Sergeant Woodrow Wilson Keeble (1917-1982) was a U.S. Army National Guard veteran of both World War II and the Korean War. He was a full-blooded member of the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate of the Lake Traverse Reservation, a Sioux Native American tribe.

Master Sergeant Keeble, a highly-decorated U.S. war veteran, didn't receive his Medal of Honor until some 16 years after his death (below).

WHITEHOUSE, March 3, 2008 — President George W. Bush applauds after presenting the Medal of Honor posthumously to family members of U.S. Army Master Sgt. Woodrow Wilson Keeble, Monday, March 3, 2008 in the East Room of the White House, in honor of Master Sgt. Keeble’s gallantry during his service in the Korean War. Kurt Bluedog, left, Keeble’s great nephew, and Russ Hawkins, a step-son, accepted the award honoring Keeble, the first full-blooded Sioux Indian to receive the Medal of Honor (source wikipedia.org).

Van T. Barfoot (Chocktaw)

A Choctaw from Mississippi, and a Second Lieutenant in the Thunderbirds. On 23 May 1944, during the breakout from Anzio to Rome, Barfoot knocked out two machine gun nests and captured 17 German soldiers. Later that same day, he repelled a German tank assault, destroyed a Nazi fieldpiece and while returning to camp carried two wounded commanders to safety.

Army Colonel Van Thurman Barfoot (1919-).

Col. Van T. Barfoot (ret.) WW II Medal of Honor
Mr. Barfoot served in the WW2, Korean and Vietnam wars. then his neighborhood association told the 90-year-old warrior to take down his flag pole.

Roy P. Benavidez (Yaqui)

US Army Special Forces soldier Roy Benavidez, Yaqui Indian (1935-1998). GI JOE action figure, Medal of Honor recipient Roy P. Benavidez (below).

CITATION:

Master Sergeant (then Staff Sergeant) Roy P. Benavidez United States Army, who distinguished himself by a series of daring and extremely valorous actions on 2 May 1968 while assigned to Detachment B56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 2 May 1968, a 12-man Special Forces Reconnaissance Team was inserted by helicopters in a dense jungle area west of Loc Ninh, Vietnam to gather intelligence information about confirmed large-scale enemy activity. This area was controlled and routinely patrolled by the North Vietnamese Army. After a short period of time on the ground, the team met heavy enemy resistance, and requested emergency extraction. Three helicopters attempted extraction, but were unable to land due to intense enemy small arms and anti-aircraft fire. Sergeant Benavidez was at the Forward Operating Base in Loc Ninh monitoring the operation by radio when these helicopters returned to off-load wounded crewmembers and to assess aircraft damage. Sergeant Benavidez voluntarily boarded a returning aircraft to assist in another extraction attempt. Realizing that all the team members were either dead or wounded and unable to move to the pickup zone, he directed the aircraft to a nearby clearing where he jumped from the hovering helicopter, and ran approximately 75 meters under withering small arms fire to the crippled team. Prior to reaching the team's position he was wounded in his right leg, face, and head. Despite these painful injuries, he took charge, repositioning the team members and directing their fire to facilitate the landing of an extraction aircraft, and the loading of wounded and dead team members. He then threw smoke canisters to direct the aircraft to the team's position. Despite his severe wounds and under intense enemy fire, he carried and dragged half of the wounded team members to the awaiting aircraft. He then provided protective fire by running alongside the aircraft as it moved to pick up the remaining team members. As the enemy's fire intensified, he hurried to recover the body and classified documents on the dead team leader. When he reached the leader's body, Sergeant Benavidez was severely wounded by small arms fire in the abdomen and grenade fragments in his back. At nearly the same moment, the aircraft pilot was mortally wounded, and his helicopter crashed. Although in extremely critical condition due to his multiple wounds, Sergeant Benavidez secured the classified documents and made his way back to the wreckage, where he aided the wounded out of the overturned aircraft, and gathered the stunned survivors into a defensive perimeter. Under increasing enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire, he moved around the perimeter distributing water and ammunition to his weary men, reinstilling in them a will to live and fight. Facing a buildup of enemy opposition with a beleaguered team, Sergeant Benavidez mustered his strength, began calling in tactical air strikes and directed the fire from supporting gunships to suppress the enemy's fire and so permit another extraction attempt. He was wounded again in his thigh by small arms fire while administering first aid to a wounded team member just before another extraction helicopter was able to land. His indomitable spirit kept him going as he began to ferry his comrades to the craft. On his second trip with the wounded, he was clubbed from additional wounds to his head and arms before killing his adversary. He then continued under devastating fire to carry the wounded to the helicopter. Upon reaching the aircraft, he spotted and killed two enemy soldiers who were rushing the craft from an angle that prevented the aircraft door gunner from firing upon them. With little strength remaining, he made one last trip to the perimeter to ensure that all classified material had been collected or destroyed, and to bring in the remaining wounded. Only then, in extremely serious condition from numerous wounds and loss of blood, did he allow himself to be pulled into the extraction aircraft. Sergeant Benavidez's gallant choice to join voluntarily his comrades who were in critical straits, to expose himself constantly to withering enemy fire, and his refusal to be stopped despite numerous severe wounds, saved the lives of at least eight men. His fearless personal leadership, tenacious devotion to duty, and extremely valorous actions in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army.

Military ribbons, medals of Master Sergeant Roy Benavidez, Medal of Honor recipient.

A Creek American Indian from Oklahoma, and a First Lieutenant with the 45th Infantry Division, Childers received the Medal of Honor for heroic action in 1943 when, up against machine gun fire, he and eight men charged the enemy. Although suffering a broken foot in the assault, Childers ordered covering fire and advanced up the hill, single-handedly killing two snipers, silencing two machine gun nests, and capturing an enemy mortar observer.

Ernest L. Childers, Muscogee (1918-2005).

Mitchell Red Cloud Jr. (Winnebago)

A Winnebago from Wisconsin, and a Corporal in Company E., 19th Infantry Regiment in Korea. On 5 November 1950, Red Cloud was on a ridge guarding his company command post when he was surprised by Chinese communist forces. He sounded the alarm and stayed in his position firing his automatic rifle and point-blank to check the assault. This gave his company time to consolidate their defenses. After being severely wounded by enemy fire, he refused assistance and continued firing upon the enemy until he was fatally wounded. His heroic action prevented the enemy from overrunning his company's position and gained time for evacuation of the wounded.

Marine Corps Medal of Honor recipient Mitchell Red Cloud Jr. (1924-1950).

Charles George (Cherokee)

A Cherokee from North Carolina, and Private First Class in Korea when he was killed on 30 November 1952. During battle, George threw himself upon a grenade and smothered it with his body. In doing so, he sacrificed his own life but saved the lives of his comrades. For this brave and selfless act, George was posthumously award the Medal of Honor in 1954.

Medal of Honor recipient Charles George (1932-1952).

Ernest Edwin Evans (Cherokee-Creek)

A Cherokee/Creek from Oklahoma, during the Battle for Leyte Gulf, 24-26 October 1944, Commander of the USS Johnston, he formed a part of the screen for escort aircraft carriers of the SEVENTH Fleet which on 25 October encountered off Samar the Center Force of the Japanese Fleet after it had transited San Bernardino Strait during the night of 24-25 October. The USS Johnston waged a gallant fight against heavy Japanese fleet units but was sunk by the enemy ships. Lieutenant Commander Evans was awarded the Navy Cross, later recalled and replaced by the Medal of Honor, awarded posthumously by United States Congress.

In addition to the Medal of Honor, the Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart Medal and Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon, Commander Evans had the China Service Medal, American Defense Medal, Fleet Clasp, and was entitled to the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with six engagement stars, the World War II Victory Medal, and the Philippine Defense and Liberation Ribbons with one star (study resource). Wikipedia.

Medal of Honor recipient Ernest E. Evans (1908-1944).

A U.S. Navy destroyer war ship, the USS Evans (DE-1023), was named in honor of Commander Evans.

Crew ship patches, USS Evans DE 1023.

Jack C. Montgomery (Cherokee)

A Cherokee from Oklahoma, and a First Lieutenant with the 45th Infantry Division Thunderbirds. On 22 February 1944, near Padiglione, Italy, Montgomery's rifle platoon was under fire by three echelons of enemy forces, when he single-handedly attacked all three positions, taking prisoners in the process. As a result of his courage, Montgomery's actions demoralized the enemy and inspired his men to defeat the Axis troops.

Medal of Honor recipient Jack C. Montgomery (1917-2002).

Pappy Boyington (Sioux)

WIKIPEDIA.ORG: Gregory "Pappy" Boyington: (December 4, 1912 – January 11, 1988) was a highly decorated American combat pilot who was a United States Marine Corps fighter ace during World War II. He received both the Medal of Honor and the Navy Cross.

Pappy Boyington served as a fighter pilot in both the US Navy and the Marines, he achieved the rank of Colonel in the Marines.

Boyington was initially a P-40 Warhawk combat pilot with the legendary "Flying Tigers" (1st American Volunteer Group) in the Republic of China Air Force in Burma at the end of 1941 and part of 1942 during the military conflict between China and Japan, and the beginning of World War II.

Boyington was shot down during a WWII combat mission and declared missing in action. He had been picked up by a Japanese submarine and became a prisoner of war. According to Boyington's autobiography, he was never accorded official P.O.W. status by the Japanese and his captivity was not reported to the Red Cross. He spent the rest of the war, some 20 months, in Japanese prison camps.

19TH CENTURY US MILITARY WAR HEROS

Alchesay
Sergeant, Indian Scouts. Place and date: Winter of 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Entered service at: Camp Verde, Arizona. Born: 1853, Arizona Territory. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Blanquet
Indian Scout. Place and date: Winter of 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Chiquito
Indian Scout. Place and date: Winter of 1871-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Co-Rux-Te-Chod-Ish (Mad Bear)
Sergeant, Pawnee Scouts, U.S. Army. Place and date: At Republican River, Kansas, 8 July 1869. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Nebraska. Date of issue: 24 August 1869. Citation: Ran out from the command in pursuit of a dismounted Indian was shot down and badly wounded by a bullet from his own command.

Elsatsoosu
Corporal, Indian Scouts. Place and date: Winter of 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Jim
Sergeant, Indian Scouts. Place and date: Winter of 1871-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona Territory. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Kelsay
Indian Scout. Place and date: Winter of 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Kosoha
Indian Scout. Place and date: Winter of 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Machol
Private, Indian Scouts. Place and date: Arizona, 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaign and engagements with Apaches.

Nannasaddie
Indian Scout. Place and date: 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Nantaje (Nantahe)
Indian Scout. Place and date: 1872-73. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 12 April 1875. Citation: Gallant conduct during campaigns and engagements with Apaches.

Rowdy
Sergeant, Company A, Indian Scouts. Place and date: Arizona, 7 March 1890. Entry of service date unknown. Birth: Arizona. Date of issue: 15 May 1890. Citation: Bravery in action with Apache Indians.


Contents

Evans arrived at San Diego, her home port, 4 August 1957, and began shakedown operations along the west coast. Her first lengthy deployment, from 21 January 1958 to 27 June, found her serving with Commander, Naval Forces Marianas, for duty in the administration of Pacific territories held by the United States in trust under the United Nations. She proceeded to visit Japan, Hong Kong, and the Philippines, and to train with ships of the navy of the Republic of Korea.

During her second tour of duty in the Far East, from 8 January 1959 to 13 June, Evans was in Leyte Gulf 7 February to conduct memorial services for her namesake, Commander Ernest Evans. She exercised with the navy of the Republic of the Philippines, patrolled the Taiwan Straits, served briefly as station ship at Hong Kong, and joined in exercises off Okinawa during the remainder of her tour. On 14 April 1960, Evans again climaxed a west coast training period by sailing for the western Pacific on a tour of duty which continued until 21 July 1960. She then returned to operations off the coast for the remainder of the year.

In September, 1968, she was assigned to the Naval Reserve Force (NRF) as a unit of Reserve Destroyer Squadron 27 at Seattle, Wash. She was eventually decommissioned on 3 December 1973 and was sold for scrap in 1974.


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World War II Database


ww2dbase Ernest Edwin Evans was born in Pawnee, Oklahoma, United States. He was 75% Cherokee in ethnicity. He originally dreamed to be a Marine officer, but he entered the Navy instead in May 1926 after performing well in the fleet competition. At the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, he was nicknamed "Chief" by his classmates, partially due to his heritage and partially due to his leadership capabilities. "Evans appreciated the hidden nature of things, the power of the unseen over the tangible", said author Jim Hornfischer. When WW2 began, he served aboard the destroyer Alden and participated in the Battle of the Java Sea in Feb 1942 Two weeks after the Java Sea battle, he assumed command of Alden. On 27 Oct 1943, he was given commission of the destroyer Johnston. "This is going to be a fighting ship", he said during the commissioning ceremony. "I intend to go in harm's way, and anyone who doesn't want to go along had better get off right now." He later added "[n]ow that I have a fighting ship, I will never retreat from an enemy force."

ww2dbase On 15 May 1944, under Evans' directions, Johnston sank the Japanese submarine I-176 by depth charges off Bougainville, Solomon Islands, and was later awarded a Bronze Star for the action. The successful hunt had a lot to do with his ability to trust his crew to get the job done. "He expected every man to do his job without any psychological ploys," recalled Lieutenant (jg) Ellsworth Welch, Evans' anti-submarine warfare officer aboard Johnston. "He had great faith in all of us", said Johnston's gunnery officer Lieutenant Robert C. Hagen, "I don't recall him saying a mean word to me the whole time. The captain was a true, instinctive fighter. We were on a high-class ship because the captain was high-class."

ww2dbase On 25 Oct 1944, during the Battle off Samar, Johnston was among the ships that laid smoke to protect the escort carriers caught in the open by heavier Japanese warships led by Vice Admiral Kurita. Not waiting for orders, Evans gave the order to go on the offensive. Johnston was lucky that the Japanese missed all attempts to hit her with gunfire, giving her an opportunity to return fire with 200 shells on cruiser Kumano with her small 5-inch guns. When she was closer, she fired 10 torpedoes, then immediately retreated from the engagement. At least one of the torpedoes hit Kumano, blowing off her bow. After receiving hits from Japanese warships, Evans was wounded by shrapnel, losing two fingers on his left hand. At 0750, orders came down for the destroyers to make a torpedo run. Although Johnston had already used all her torpedoes and one of the engines had been lost, Evans ordered her in anyway as a means to provide fire support and to draw fire from the ships that still had torpedoes. At 0820, Johnston came within 7,000 yards from a Japanese battleship, and the guns fired 30 rounds within a minute, hitting the Japanese battleship several times. Then, she headed toward a heavy cruiser that had been attacking the escort carrier Gambier Bay, attempting to draw fire to save the escort carrier. After exchanging fire with the heavy cruiser, she took on an entire Japanese destroyer squadron that was on a torpedo run Johnston's persistent attack forced the squadron to fire their torpedoes early, which was a major reason why all these torpedoes went astray. However, this final attack run against an entire destroyer squadron was also Johnston's last. After a shot hit her number one boiler room, steam was cut to the lone remaining engine, leaving her dead in the water. At around 0940, Japanese ships poured shells into Johnston as they sailed in semi-circles around the ship. A hit knocked out the forward gun, and then another hit on the 40-mm ready ammunition locker left the already damaged bridge totally untenable. At 0945, Evans gave the order for the crew of Johnston to abandon ship. The destroyer was now a gruesome scene of death. Lieutenant Jesse Cochran, a survivor of Johnston, later recalled seeing "a pile of people - bodies - half alive, half dead" on the deck. At 1010, she rolled over and began to sink by the bow. Evans was last seen around this time, with Machinist's Mate Bob Sochor probably the last man to have done so. Having just re-gained consciousness after a shell blast, he ran for the fantail after realizing the abandon ship order had already been given. He ran across Evans en route, with neither one of them speaking a word in each other. "We passed by staring blankly at one another", recalled Sochor. It was not certain whether he was killed on the ship. Survivor Allen Johnson saw an officer dive into the water for a motor whaleboat, while others said they saw Evans climb into the whaleboat however, none of them could make positive identification during the chaos. What was certain was that he was not among those rescued.

ww2dbase Evans was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery during the Battle off Samar. The citation read:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Johnston in action against major units of the enemy Japanese fleet during the battle off Samar on 25 October 1944. The first to lay a smokescreen and to open fire as an enemy task force, vastly superior in number, firepower and armor, rapidly approached. Comdr. Evans gallantly diverted the powerful blasts of hostile guns from the lightly armed and armored carriers under his protection, launching the first torpedo attack when the Johnston came under straddling Japanese shellfire. Undaunted by damage sustained under the terrific volume of fire, he unhesitatingly joined others of his group to provide fire support during subsequent torpedo attacks against the Japanese and, outshooting and outmaneuvering the enemy as he consistently interposed his vessel between the hostile fleet units and our carriers despite the crippling loss of engine power and communications with steering aft, shifted command to the fantail, shouted steering orders through an open hatch to men turning the rudder by hand and battled furiously until the Johnston, burning and shuddering from a mortal blow, lay dead in the water after 3 hours of fierce combat. Seriously wounded early in the engagement, Comdr. Evans, by his indomitable courage and brilliant professional skill, aided materially in turning back the enemy during a critical phase of the action. His valiant fighting spirit throughout this historic battle will venture as an inspiration to all who served with him.

ww2dbase In 1955, the destroyer escort Evans was named in his honor.

ww2dbase Sources: the Last Stand of Tin Can Sailors, Wikipedia.

Last Major Revision: Aug 2007

Ernest Evans Interactive Map

Ernest Evans Timeline

13 Aug 1908 Ernest Evans was born.
25 Oct 1944 Ernest Evans was killed in action during the Battle off Samar during the Leyte Campaign in the Philippine Islands.
25 Oct 1944 As Kurita’s Center Force closed on Clifton Sprague’s escort carriers off Samar, destroyer USS Johnston attacked and launched torpedoes against the cruiser Kumano, blowing off Kumano’s bow and forcing her withdrawal.

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Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Only Medal of Honor in the Battle off Samar, Chief Evans. says:
30 Apr 2012 01:09:13 PM

Evans wasn't just protecting the flattops - he also had all the landed young soldiers with MacArthur on his mind. Who/what he charged was Yamato, biggest warship ever built, and the massive jap force with it. He was oblivious to Spragg and Taffy3, and instantly on learning of the gigantic enemy force approaching, ordered "Hard left rudder, flank speed". (Charge the enemy at full-speed.)
Who knows how long Spragg would have "idled about stunned at their bad luck" - without Johnston's truly heroic charge Hoel Heermann etc. may not have been as aggressive, allowing Kurita and his massive power to take out the carriers and wipe out the whole MacArthur Return.
History owes much to this Warrior. Where is the frigate namesake 'Ernest E. Evans'.

2. Paul Moore says:
20 Dec 2014 08:45:47 PM

Its seems that the Navy is more interested in naming fighting vessels for politicians and Navy procurement heroes than naming them for the MEN who gave all like Commander Ernest Evans. Leyte Gulf might have gone down as an American bloodbath if not for Evans. Where is the USS Evans?

3. David Stubblebine says:
21 Dec 2014 03:57:22 PM

US Navy naming customs call for destroyers and destroyer escorts to be named for notable naval heroes and Navy & Marine recipients of the Medal of Honor in particular. Ernest E. Evans of the USS Johnston is the namesake of the Dealey-class destroyer escort USS Evans (DE-1023) commissioned Jun 14, 1957. USS Evans was decommissioned in 1968 and in 2013 it was proposed to use his name again for another Navy ship. Instead, the virtual simulator for ship handling training at the Surface Warfare Officers School in Newport, Rhode Island was dedicated as the 'Evans Full Mission-2 Simulator' in his honor.

4. Anonymous says:
13 Mar 2015 08:31:57 AM

Ernest Evans deserves a warship in his honor.

5. Andrew Roth says:
9 Apr 2015 05:01:30 AM

Ernest Evan's and the men of U.S.S. Johnston deserve something better than a Navy simulator. At least some piece of something that fight's. What enormous gut's.

6. Zeke Lay says:
18 Sep 2015 06:54:53 AM

a striking example of the strange and tragic effort to remove or block the most important historical heritage of America. Surely this isn't happening by chance? It wasn't long ago we cherished our heroes. It is an institutional problem, not a problem with the American people. I cannot even find a museum or tribute in his hometown or birthplace. A TRUE HERO in every sense of the word, recent enough to help us envision all the other patriots in America's past that have enabled this great country.

7. Alan Loch says:
13 Mar 2020 08:11:49 PM

Perhaps the greatest story of heroism ever recorded in US Navy history. He and his men should be honored at flight school by carrier sailors like the Marines honor Coast Guard First Class Higgins Boat pilot Doug Monro who got the MOH saving them.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


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