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Suffolk County LST-1173 - History

Suffolk County LST-1173 - History



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Suffolk County

(LST-1173: dp. 3,560; 1. 445'; b. 62'; dr. 18'; s. 17
k.; cpl. 124; trp. 706; a. 6 3'; cl. Suffolk County)

Suffolk County (LST' 1173) was laid down on 17 July 1955 by the Boston Naval Shipyard, Boston, Mass.; launched on 5 September 1956, sponsored by Mrs. Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr.; and commissioned on 15 August 1957, Lt. Comdr. James E. Brown in command.

Suffolk County fitted out at Boston and sailed for Norfolk, Va., on 1 October, to hold shakedown training and exercises in beaching. She returned to Boston from 5 December 1957 to 3 February 1958 for postshakedown availability. The ship was back at Norfolk three days later and began local training exercises. From 19 July to 7 August, the LST participated in amphibious training exercises off Puerto Rico.

Suffolk County departed Norfolk on 8 September and, after embarking marines at Morehead City, N.C. sailed for the Mediterranean and her first tour with the 6th Fleet. Between fleet exercises, she called at ports in Lebanon, Crete, Greece, Turkey, Italy, Libya, and Spain. The ship stood out of Rota, Spain, on 12 March 1959. After disembarking the marines at Morehead City, she returned to Norfolk on the 26th. In June, she participated in Operation "Inland Seas" which was the formal opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway for ocean-going ship9.

Suffolk County returned to Norfolk in August and was assigned to Amphibious Squadron (PhibRon) 8 which promptly deployed to the Mediterranean until 12 June 1960 when it returned to Norfolk. After a leave and upkeep period, she moved to Charleston, S.C., for her first overhaul which lasted from mid-July to 15 September. As a unit of PhibRon 8, the ship participated in a landing demonstration off Onslow Beach, N.C., from 29 October to 3 November, The following month found her in the Caribbean on a two-month deployment, ending at Norfolk on 17 January 1961.

Suffolk County returned to the Caribbean in April on a normal deployment. However, she was called upon to operate off Guantanamo Bay from 25 April to 5 May and off the Dominican Republic from 1 to 13 June because of the international tension those two countries were creating. She returned to Norfolk and operated from there until 15 September when she sailed on Solant Amity III deployment. After loading marines and equipment at North Carolina, she proceeded to Trinidad. Suffolk County was attached to Task Force (TF) 88 for the remainder of the cruise which included port calls at South Africa, French Equatorial Africa, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. She returned to Little Creek on 16 December 1961.

Suffolk County operated along the east coast, participating in various operations, deployments, and exercises which took her as far south as the Caribbean, Panama, and the Dominican Republic until 1966. She was at Guantanamo on 26 September 1966 when hurricane "Inez" struck the Caribbean and left a path of destruction in Hispaniola. Suffolk County aided the inhabitants of Jacmel-Cayes, Anse-a-Pitre, and Marigot, on the southern coast of Haiti, until 7 October. The LST then continued her routine operations until early 1968.

On 16 April 1968, Suffolk County sailed for another deployment period with the 6th Fleet which lasted until 4 June. Normal peacetime, east coast operations were resumed until September 1970 when she steamed to the Mediterranean to partake in a two-month exercise with North Atlantic Treaty Organization fleet units which ended on 18 November 1970. Her normal routine was next broken in September 1971 when she deployed to the 6th Fleet for her longest tour in years which lasted until mid-March 1972.

When Suffolk County arrived at Norfolk, she was ordered to prepare for inactivation. A "stand-down" phase was begun on 24 May which lasted until 1 July when she was placed in commission, in reserve. On 25 August 1972, Suffolk County was placed out of commission, in reserve. As of February 1974, Suffolk County was still out of commission, in reserve, and berthed at Norfolk, Va.


Suffolk County LST-1173 - History

Counties in Massachusetts and New York.

(LST-1173: dp. 3,560 1. 446' b. 62' dr. 18' s. 17 k. cpl. 124 trp. 706 a. 6 3' cl. Suffolk County )

Suffolk County (LST-1173) was laid down on 17 July 1955 by the Boston Naval Shipyard, Boston, Mass., launched on 5 September 1956, sponsored by Mrs. Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. and commissioned on 15 August 1957, Lt. Comdr. James E. Brown in command.

Suffolk County fitted out at Boston and sailed for Norfolk, Va., on 1 October, to hold shakedown training and exercises in beaching. She returned to Boston from 5 December 1957 to 3 February 1958 for post-shakedown availability. The ship was back at Norfolk three days later and began local training exercises. From 19 July to 7 August, the LST participated in amphibious training exercises off Puerto Rico.

Suffolk County departed Norfolk on 8 September and, after embarking marines at Morehead City, N.C., sailed for the Mediterranean and her first tour with the 6th Fleet. Between fleet exercises, she called at ports in Lebanon, Crete, Greece, Turkey, Italy, Libya, and Spain. The ship stood out of Rota, Spain, on 12 March 1959. After disembarking the marines at Morehead City, she returned to Norfolk on the 26th. In June, she participated in Operation "Inland Seas" which was the formal opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway for ocean-going ships.

Suffolk County returned to Norfolk in August and was assigned to Amphibious Squadron (PhibRon) 8 which promptly deployed to the Mediterranean until 12 June 1960 when it returned to Norfolk. After a leave and upkeep period, she moved to Charleston, S.C., for her first overhaul which lasted from mid-July to 15 September. As a unit of PhibRon 8, the ship participated in a landing demonstration off Onslow Beach, N.C., from 29 October to 3 November. The following month found her in the Caribbean on a two-month deployment, ending at Norfolk on 17 January 1961.

Suffolk County returned to the Caribbean in April on a normal deployment. However, she was called upon to operate off Guantanamo Bay from 25 April to 5 May and off the Dominican Republic from 1 to 13 June because of the international tension those two countries were creating. She returned to Norfolk and operated from there until 15 September when she sailed on Solant Amity III deployment. After loading marines and equipment at North Carolina, she proceeded to Trinidad. Suffolk County was attached to Task Force (TF) 88 for the remainder of the cruise which included port calls at South Africa, French Equatorial Africa, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. She returned to Little Creek on 16 December 1961.

Suffolk County operated along the east coast, participating in various operations, deployments, and exercises which took her as far south as the Caribbean, Panama, and the Dominican Republic until 1966. She was at Guantanamo on 26 September 1966 when hurricane "Inez" struck the Caribbean and left a path of destruction in Hispaniola. Suffolk County aided the inhabitants of Jacmel-Cayes, Anse-a-Pitre, and Marigot, on the southern coast of Haiti, until 7 October. The LST then continued her routine operations until early 1968.

On 16 April 1968, Suffolk County sailed for another deployment period with the 6th Fleet which lasted until 4 June. Normal peacetime, east coast operations were resumed until September 1970 when she steamed to the Mediterranean to partake in a two-month exercise with North Atlantic Treaty Organization fleet units which ended on 18 November 1970. Her normal routine was next broken in September 1971 when she deployed to the 6th Fleet for her longest tour in years which lasted until mid-March 1972.

When Suffolk County arrived at Norfolk, she was ordered to prepare for inactivation. A "stand-down" phase was begun on 24 May which lasted until 1 July when she was placed in commission, in reserve. On 25 August 1972, Suffolk County was placed out of commission, in reserve. As of February 1974, Suffolk County was still out of commission, in reserve, and berthed at Norfolk, Va.


Find Suffolk County Property Records

Suffolk County Property Records are real estate documents that contain information related to real property in Suffolk County, New York. Public Property Records provide information on homes, land, or commercial properties, including titles, mortgages, property deeds, and a range of other documents. They are maintained by various government offices in Suffolk County, New York State, and at the Federal level. They are a valuable tool for the real estate industry, offering both buyers and sellers detailed information about properties, parcels and their owners.


Contents

1957 � [ edit | edit source ]

Suffolk County fitted out at Boston and sailed for Norfolk, Virginia on 1 October to hold shakedown training and exercises in beaching. She returned to Boston from 5 December 1957 to 3 February 1958 for post-shakedown availability. The ship was back at Norfolk three days later and began local training exercises. From 19 July to 7 August the LST participated in amphibious training exercises off Puerto Rico. Suffolk County departed Norfolk on 8 September and, after embarking marines at Morehead City, North Carolina sailed for the Mediterranean and her first tour with the 6th Fleet. She was part of the Armed Forces Expeditionary Group at Beirut, Lebanon from 29 September to 18 October 1958. Between fleet maneuvers that included amphibious assault landing exercises on Crete, Sardinia (twice), Libya and Almeria, Spain she called at ports in Gibraltar, Lebanon, Crete, Greece, Turkey, Italy, Spain and France. The ship stood out of Rota, Spain on 12 March 1959. After disembarking the marines at Morehead City on 24 March, she returned to Norfolk on the 26th. In June, she participated in "Operation Inland Seas" which was the formal opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway for ocean-going ships.

1960� [ edit | edit source ]

Suffolk County returned to Norfolk in August and was assigned to Amphibious Squadron (PhibRon) 8 which promptly deployed to the Mediterranean until 12 June 1960 when it returned to Norfolk. After a leave and upkeep period, she moved to Charleston, South Carolina for her first overhaul which lasted from mid-July to 15 September. As a unit of PhibRon 8, the ship participated in a landing demonstration off Onslow Beach, North Carolina from 29 October to 3 November. The following month found her in the Caribbean on a two-month deployment, ending at Norfolk on 17 January 1961. Suffolk County returned to the Caribbean in April on a normal deployment. However, she was called upon to operate off Guantánamo Bay from 25 April to 5 May and off the Dominican Republic from 1 to 13 June because of the international tension those two countries were creating. She returned to Norfolk and operated from there until 15 September when she sailed on "SoLant Amity III" deployment. After loading marines and equipment at North Carolina, she proceeded to Trinidad. Suffolk County was attached to Task Force (TF) 88 for the remainder of the cruise which included port calls at South Africa, French Equatorial Africa, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. She returned to Little Creek, Virginia on 16 December 1961.

1962� [ edit | edit source ]

Suffolk County operated along the east coast, participating in various operations, deployments, and exercises which took her as far south as the Caribbean, Panama, and the Dominican Republic. From September to December 1964 she was involved in the cross Atlantic operation, "Operation Steel Pike", the largest amphibious operation since the World War II Normandy Landings. Elements of the 2nd Marine Division were landed at several locations along the Spanish coast. Suffolk County, in addition to her ship's company, carried several companies of Marines and she also served as the "home base" for the U.S. Naval Cargo Handling Battalion One (CHBONE). She was at Guantanamo on 26 September 1966 when Hurricane Inez struck the Caribbean and left a path of destruction in Hispaniola. Suffolk County aided the inhabitants of Cayes-Jacmel, Anse-à-Pitres, and Marigot, on the southern coast of Haiti, until 7 October. The LST then continued her routine operations until early 1968. On 16 April 1968 Suffolk County sailed for another deployment period with the 6th Fleet which lasted until 4 June. Normal peacetime, east coast operations were resumed until September 1970 when she steamed to the Mediterranean to partake in a two-month exercise with North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) fleet units which ended on 18 November 1970. Her normal routine was next broken in September 1971 when she deployed to the 6th Fleet for her longest tour in years which lasted until mid-March 1972.

Decommissioning [ edit | edit source ]

When Suffolk County arrived at Norfolk, she was ordered to prepare for inactivation. A "stand-down" phase was begun on 24 May 1972 which lasted until 1 July when she was placed in commission, in reserve. On 25 August Suffolk County was placed out of commission, in reserve.

Disposed of by transfer to the Maritime Administration (MARAD) on 15 April 1992 for lay-up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at James River, Fort Eustis, Virginia, the ship was sold for $500 to Transforma Marine of Brownsville, Texas for scrapping, 31 March 1999. Suffolk County was removed from the Reserve Fleet 23 November 1999 and scrapped.


Contents

1957 –1959

Suffolk County fitted out at Boston and sailed for Norfolk, Virginia on 1 October to hold shakedown training and exercises in beaching. She returned to Boston from 5 December 1957 to 3 February 1958 for post-shakedown availability. The ship was back at Norfolk three days later and began local training exercises. From 19 July to 7 August the LST participated in amphibious training exercises off Puerto Rico. Suffolk County departed Norfolk on 8 September and, after embarking marines at Morehead City, North Carolina sailed for the Mediterranean and her first tour with the 6th Fleet. She was part of the Armed Forces Expeditionary Group at Beirut, Lebanon from 29 September to 18 October 1958. Between fleet maneuvers that included amphibious assault landing exercises on Crete, Sardinia (twice), Libya and Almeria, Spain she called at ports in Gibraltar, Lebanon, Crete, Greece, Turkey, Italy, Spain and France. The ship stood out of Rota, Spain on 12 March 1959. After disembarking the marines at Morehead City on 24 March, she returned to Norfolk on the 26th. In June, she participated in "Operation Inland Seas" which was the formal opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway for ocean-going ships.

1960–1961

Suffolk County returned to Norfolk in August and was assigned to Amphibious Squadron (PhibRon) 8 which promptly deployed to the Mediterranean until 12 June 1960 when it returned to Norfolk. After a leave and upkeep period, she moved to Charleston, South Carolina for her first overhaul which lasted from mid-July to 15 September. As a unit of PhibRon 8, the ship participated in a landing demonstration off Onslow Beach, North Carolina from 29 October to 3 November. The following month found her in the Caribbean on a two-month deployment, ending at Norfolk on 17 January 1961. Suffolk County returned to the Caribbean in April on a normal deployment. However, she was called upon to operate off Guantánamo Bay from 25 April to 5 May and off the Dominican Republic from 1 to 13 June because of the international tension those two countries were creating. She returned to Norfolk and operated from there until 15 September when she sailed on "SoLant Amity III" deployment. After loading marines and equipment at North Carolina, she proceeded to Trinidad. Suffolk County was attached to Task Force (TF) 88 for the remainder of the cruise which included port calls at South Africa, French Equatorial Africa, Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. She returned to Little Creek, Virginia on 16 December 1961.

1962–1972

Suffolk County operated along the east coast, participating in various operations, deployments, and exercises which took her as far south as the Caribbean, Panama, and the Dominican Republic. From September to December 1964 she was involved in the cross Atlantic operation, "Operation Steel Pike", the largest amphibious operation since the World War II Normandy Landings. Elements of the 2nd Marine Division were landed at several locations along the Spanish coast. Suffolk County, in addition to her ship's company, carried several companies of Marines and she also served as the "home base" for the U.S. Naval Cargo Handling Battalion One (CHBONE). She was at Guantanamo on 26 September 1966 when Hurricane Inez struck the Caribbean and left a path of destruction in Hispaniola. Suffolk County aided the inhabitants of Cayes-Jacmel, Anse-à-Pitres, and Marigot, on the southern coast of Haiti, until 7 October. The LST then continued her routine operations until early 1968. On 16 April 1968 Suffolk County sailed for another deployment period with the 6th Fleet which lasted until 4 June. Normal peacetime, east coast operations were resumed until September, 1970 when she steamed to the Mediterranean to partake in a two-month exercise with North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) fleet units which ended on 18 November 1970. Her normal routine was next broken in September, 1971 when she deployed to the 6th Fleet for her longest tour in years which lasted until mid-March, 1972.

Decommissioning

When Suffolk County arrived at Norfolk, she was ordered to prepare for inactivation. A "stand-down" phase was begun on 24 May 1972 which lasted until 1 July when she was placed in commission, in reserve. On 25 August Suffolk County was placed out of commission, in reserve.

Disposed of by transfer to the Maritime Administration (MARAD) on 15 April 1992 for lay-up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at James River, Fort Eustis, Virginia, the ship was sold for $500 to Transforma Marine of Brownsville, Texas for scrapping, 31 March 1999. Suffolk County was removed from the Reserve Fleet 23 November 1999 and scrapped.


History of Suffolk County

Suffolk County comprises 1000 square miles of eastern two-thirds of Long Island. Long Island itself extends 120 miles into the Atlantic Ocean, East from New York City. The distance from the Nassau County border to Montauk Point is 86 miles. At Suffolk County’s widest point the distance from Long Island Sound to the southern shore is 26 miles.

Long Island was formed during the Pleistocene Era when the earth warmed and the massive glaciers then covering the area melted, leaving glacial moraines of rock and soil deposits which shaped the island. Extending back 10,000 years and up to the 17th century, the island was inhabited by numerous small groups of Algonquins having a language and culture throughout the Middle Atlantic region and what is now New England. Historians estimate the native population to have been no more than 6,000 (In 1994 there were approximately 1,400,000 residents of Suffolk.) The Algonquins fished and harvested shellfish at the shore and hunted the inland wilderness. From clam shells and whelk they chiseled wampum, the currency of eastern natives and, in the 17th century, adopted as money by colonists.

The Dutchman, Adrian Block, the first explorer to touch land at Montauk point in 1614, encountered native Americans. The first white resident was Lion Gardiner, who settled in 1639 on the Island between the north and south forks. Gardiner’s Island still bears his family name.

English colonists crossed Long Island Sound from Connecticut and Massachusetts colonies, founding Southold and southampton (1640), East Hampton (1648), Shelter Island (1652), and Setauket, in Brookhaven (1655). Dutch settlers moved eastward from Manhattan Island. By the mid-1600s the Dutch had ceded control of eastern Long Island to the English.

In the 1670s, James, Duke of York, who owned Long Island, appointed Thomas Dongan to govern it. At a gathering of colonial representatives, the “Charter of Liberties and Privileges” was adopted (1 November 1683), establishing Suffolk county as a political entity and as one of the 12 original counties of the Province of New York, and laying the foundation for the State’s present political subdivisions and governmental structure. The County was occupied by the British for the seven years of the Revolutionary War, from 1776 to 25 November 1783.

From the first years of colonization, the heavily wooded forests provided wood which Long Islanders cut and shipped as cordwood and as board footage for local ship and home builders. As the land was cleared, the rich acreage was farmed. Fishing and shipbuilding were other early industries. Until the 1850s whaling was an important source of income.

Faring remains a staple of eastern Long Island commerce, although strawberries, cabbage, potatoes, pumpkins and sod acres are giving way to horse farms and vineyards. Its quaint historic villages, rocky north shore beaches and calm waters, the white sand and breakers off Fire Island, and the dependable winds and safe harbors for sailing make tourism a major Suffolk County industry. In the 1930s the County became the site of large-scale suppliers to the U.S. defense and aerospace industries. For example, Grumman Corporation played an important role in developing high-technology jet planes, such as the Navy F14 fighter, as well as the lunar module (LEM) which first landed men on the moon in 1969. After World War I, Brookhaven National Laboratory, a research institution administered by Associated Universities Inc. and funded by the Federal Government, was established on the site of Camp Upton in Yaphank. Its scientists develop peaceful uses of atomic energy. High technology centers make Suffolk County sixth in the nation in the production of radio and television communications equipment and aircraft manufacture.

Since World War II, Long Island has epitomized the phenomenon of growing suburbia. In 1955, mass-produced housing developments, along with new major institutions of learning, contributed to Suffolk County’s population explosion. Foremost among the latter is the State University of New York at Stony Brook, which opened on a 1000-acre campus in 1962. Its Health Science Center and 18-story University Hospital became Long Island’s tallest buildings in 1976. For some, the Island’s bucolic pleasures are offset by new problems accompanying population growth: disappearing farms replaced by housing developments, strip-zoning along once pastoral roads, dependence on the automobile, overcrowded roadways, possible effects of pollution of inland and coastal waters, and mounting waste-disposal needs.

Long Island’s leading newspaper, Newsday, founded by Alicia Paterson in 1940 in Hempstead, started a Suffolk edition in 1944. The paper features investigative news coverage of local public officials and institutions, up-to-the-minute sports, and coverage of world and national affairs.


Suffolk County, New York

Suffolk County ( / ˈ s ʌ f ə k / ) is a predominantly suburban county and is the easternmost county in the U.S. state of New York. According to the 2010 United States census, the county's population was 1,493,350, estimated to have decreased slightly to 1,476,601 in 2019, [1] making it the fourth-most populous county in New York State, after New York City's Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan. Its county seat is Riverhead, [2] though most county offices are in Hauppauge. [3] The county was named after the county of Suffolk in England, from where its earliest European settlers came.

Suffolk County incorporates the easternmost extreme of the New York City metropolitan area. The largest of Long Island's four counties and the second-largest of 62 counties in New York State, Suffolk measures 86 miles (138 km) in length and 26 miles (42 km) in width at its widest (including water). [4] Most of the island is near sea level, with over 1,000 miles of coastline. [5] This makes the county particularly vulnerable to climate change caused sea level rise.

Like other parts of Long Island, the high population density and relative closeness to New York City means that the economy has a mix of industry and science satellite to the city alongside more rural activities like agriculture, a fishery and tourism. Major scientific research facilities in Suffolk County include Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Huntington, and Plum Island Animal Disease Center on Plum Island. The county is also home to several major universities such as Stony Brook University and Farmingdale State College.

History

Suffolk County was part of the Connecticut Colony before becoming an original county of the Province of New York, one of twelve created in 1683. From 1664 until 1683 it had been the East Riding of Yorkshire. Its boundaries were essentially the same as at present, with only minor changes in the boundary with its western neighbor, which was originally Queens County but has been Nassau County since the separation of Nassau from Queens in 1899.

According to the Suffolk County website, the county is the leading agricultural county in the state of New York, saying that: "The weather is temperate, clean water is abundant, and the soil is so good that Suffolk is the leading agricultural county in New York State. That Suffolk is still number one in farming, even with the development that has taken place, is a tribute to thoughtful planning, along with the excellent soil, favorable weather conditions, and the work of the dedicated farmers in this region." [6]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has an area of 2,373 square miles (6,150 km 2 ), of which 912 square miles (2,360 km 2 ) is land and 1,461 square miles (3,780 km 2 ) (62%) is water. [7] It is the second-largest county in New York by total area and occupies 66% of the land area of Long Island.

Suffolk County occupies the central and eastern part of Long Island, in the extreme east of New York State. The eastern end of the county splits into two peninsulas, known as the North Fork and the South Fork. The county is surrounded by water on three sides, including the Atlantic Ocean and Long Island Sound, with 980 miles (1,580 km) of coastline. The eastern end contains large bays.

The highest elevation in the county, and on Long Island as a whole, is Jayne's Hill in West Hills, at 401 feet (122 m) above sea level. This low lying-geography means that much of the county is vulnerable to sea level rise. [5]

Climate

Suffolk County sits at the convergence of climate zones including the humid continental (Dfa/Dfb), humid subtropical (Cfa), and oceanic (Cfb). Most of the county by land area is in the Dfa zone. Summers are cooler at the east end than in the western part of the county. The hardiness zone is 7a, except in Copiague Harbor, Lindenhurst, and Montauk, where it is 7b. Average monthly temperatures in Hauppauge range from 31.0 °F (−0.6 °C) in January to 74.0 °F (23.3 °C) in July, and in the Riverhead town center they range from 30.1 °F (−1.1 °C) in January to 72.8 °F (22.7 °C) in July, which includes both daytime and nighttime temperatures. PRISM Climate Group, Oregon State U On February 9, 2013, Suffolk County was besieged with 30 inches of snow, making it the largest day of snowfall on record in Suffolk. [8]

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 16,400
1800 19,735 20.3%
1810 21,113 7.0%
1820 23,936 13.4%
1830 26,780 11.9%
1840 32,469 21.2%
1850 36,922 13.7%
1860 43,275 17.2%
1870 46,924 8.4%
1880 52,888 12.7%
1890 62,491 18.2%
1900 77,582 24.1%
1910 96,138 23.9%
1920 110,246 14.7%
1930 161,055 46.1%
1940 197,355 22.5%
1950 276,129 39.9%
1960 666,784 141.5%
1970 1,124,950 68.7%
1980 1,284,231 14.2%
1990 1,321,864 2.9%
2000 1,419,369 7.4%
2010 1,493,350 5.2%
2019 (est.) 1,476,601 −1.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]
1790-1960 [11] 1900-1990 [12]
1990-2000 [13] 2010-2019 [1]

According to the 2010 U.S. census [14] there were 1,493,350 people and 569,985 households residing in the county. The census estimated Suffolk County's population decreased slightly to 1,481,093 in 2018, representing 7.5% of the census-estimated New York State population of 19,745,289 [15] and 19.0% of the census-estimated Long Island population of 7,869,820. [16] [17] [18] [19] The population density in 2010 was 1,637 people per square mile (633/km 2 ), with 569,985 households at an average density of 625 per square mile (242/km 2 ). However, by 2012, with an estimated total population increasing moderately to 1,499,273 there were 569,359 housing units. [20] As of 2006, Suffolk County was the 21st-most populous county in the United States. [21]

By 2014, the county's racial makeup was estimated at 85.2% White, 8.3% African American, 0.6% Native American, 4.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, and 1.8% from two or more races. Those identifying as Hispanic or Latino, of any race, were 18.2% of the population. Those who identified as "white alone", not being of Hispanic or Latino origin, represented 69.3% of the population. [22] In 2006, the county's racial or ethnic makeup was 83.6% White (75.4% White Non-Hispanic). African Americans were 7.4% of the population. Asians stood at 3.4% of the population. 5.4% were of other or mixed race. Latinos were 13.0% of the population. [23] In 2007, Suffolk County's most common ethnicities were Italian (29.5%), Irish (24.0%), and German (17.6%). [24]

In 2002, The New York Times cited a study by the non-profit group ERASE Racism, which determined Suffolk and its neighboring county, Nassau, to be the most racially segregated suburbs in the United States. [25]

In 2006, there were 469,299 households, of which 37.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.00% were married couples living together, 10.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.20% were non-families. 18.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.36.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.10% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 31.20% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 11.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.80 males.

In 2008, Forbes magazine released its American Community Survey and named Suffolk County number 4 in its list of the top 25 richest counties in America. In 2016, according to Business Insider, the 11962 zip code encompassing Sagaponack, within Southampton, was listed as the most expensive in the U.S., with a median home sale price of $8.5 million. [26]

The median income for a household in the county was $84,767, [27] and the median income for a family was $72,112. Males had a median income of $50,046 versus $33,281 for females. The per capita income for the county was $26,577. Using a weighted average from 2009 to 2014 about 6.40% of the population were below the poverty line [22] In earlier censuses, the population below the poverty line included 2.70% of those under age 18 and 2.30% of those age 65 or over.

Racial groups, ethnicity, and religious groups on Long Island
compared to state and nation
Place
Population
2010
census
%
white
%
black
or
African
American
%
Asian
%
Other
%
mixed
race
%
Hispanic/
Latino
of any
race
%
Catholic
% not
affiliated
%
Jewish
%
Protestant
Estimate
of % not
reporting
Race Ethnicity Religious groups
Nassau County 1,339,532 73.0 11.1 7.6 5.9 2.4 14.6 52 9 17 7 15
Suffolk County 1,493,350 80.8 7.4 3.4 5.9 2.4 16.5 52 21 7 8 11
Long Island Total
(including Brooklyn and Queens)
7,568,304 54.7 20.4 12.3 9.3 3.2 20.5 40 18 15 7 20
NY State 19,378,102 65.7 15.9 7.3 8.0 3.0 17.6 42 20 9 10 16
USA 308,745,538 72.4 12.6 4.8 7.3 2.9 16.3 22 37 2 23 12
Source for Race and Ethnicity: 2010 Census [28]
American Indian, Native Alaskan, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander make up just 0.5% of the population of Long Island, and have been included with "Other".
Source for religious groups: ARDA2000 [29] [30]

Law and government

United States presidential election results for Suffolk County, New York [31]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No. % No. % No. %
2020 381,253 49.30% 381,021 49.27% 11,013 1.42%
2016 350,570 51.46% 303,951 44.62% 26,733 3.92%
2012 282,131 47.48% 304,079 51.17% 8,056 1.36%
2008 307,021 46.53% 346,549 52.53% 6,209 0.94%
2004 309,949 48.53% 315,909 49.46% 12,854 2.01%
2000 240,992 41.99% 306,306 53.37% 26,646 4.64%
1996 182,510 36.13% 261,828 51.83% 60,875 12.05%
1992 229,467 40.40% 220,811 38.88% 117,677 20.72%
1988 311,242 60.51% 199,215 38.73% 3,893 0.76%
1984 335,485 66.03% 171,295 33.72% 1,276 0.25%
1980 256,294 57.00% 149,945 33.35% 43,416 9.66%
1976 248,908 54.10% 208,263 45.27% 2,877 0.63%
1972 316,452 70.34% 132,441 29.44% 1,005 0.22%
1968 218,027 58.18% 122,590 32.71% 34,150 9.11%
1964 144,350 44.37% 180,598 55.51% 385 0.12%
1960 166,644 59.32% 114,033 40.59% 268 0.10%
1956 167,805 77.64% 48,323 22.36% 0 0.00%
1952 115,570 74.58% 39,120 25.25% 262 0.17%
1948 75,519 69.75% 29,104 26.88% 3,642 3.36%
1944 65,650 67.59% 31,231 32.15% 253 0.26%
1940 63,712 65.12% 33,853 34.60% 270 0.28%
1936 48,970 58.07% 33,078 39.22% 2,287 2.71%
1932 40,247 55.49% 30,799 42.46% 1,482 2.04%
1928 41,199 65.07% 19,497 30.79% 2,619 4.14%
1924 31,456 69.20% 10,024 22.05% 3,975 8.74%
1920 26,737 73.10% 8,852 24.20% 985 2.69%
1916 12,742 59.20% 8,422 39.13% 358 1.66%
1912 5,595 28.47% 7,878 40.08% 6,182 31.45%
1908 10,689 60.29% 5,877 33.15% 1,164 6.57%
1904 9,937 57.19% 6,795 39.11% 642 3.70%
1900 9,584 60.24% 5,711 35.90% 615 3.87%
1896 9,388 66.60% 3,872 27.47% 837 5.94%
1892 7,001 49.29% 6,274 44.17% 928 6.53%
1888 7,167 50.23% 6,600 46.26% 500 3.50%
1884 5,876 45.85% 6,429 50.17% 510 3.98%

Suffolk County had long been a Republican bastion in New York State. U.S. Congressman Rick Lazio, who opposed Hillary Clinton in the 2000 Senate race, was from Suffolk County. However, recent elections have turned the county more toward the Democrats. In 2003, Democrat Steve Levy was elected county executive, ending longtime Republican control. In 2001, Democrat Thomas Spota was elected District Attorney, and ran unopposed in 2005. Although Suffolk voters gave George H. W. Bush a victory here in 1992, the county voted for Bill Clinton in 1996 and continued the trend by giving Al Gore an 11-percent victory in the county in 2000. 2004 Democratic candidate John Kerry won by a much smaller margin of one percent, in 2008 Democratic candidate Barack Obama won by a slightly larger 4.4 percent margin, 52%-47%. In 2016, Republican candidate Donald Trump won Suffolk County by a 6.9 percent margin after absentees, marking the largest margin of victory for the Republicans since 1988. It was the only large county (over 200,000 voters) in New York State that Donald Trump won. [31]

In 2020, Trump again won Suffolk County this time, however, it was decided by just 232 votes out of nearly 800,000 votes cast, making it among the closest counties in the nation, and representing nearly a 7-point swing towards the Democratic ticket of former Vice President Joe Biden and junior California senator Kamala Harris. In percentage terms, it was the closest county in the state, although Ontario County and Warren County had narrower raw vote margins of just 39 and 57 votes, respectively. Suffolk was one of five counties in the state that Trump won by less than 500 votes. With Tarrant County, Texas and Maricopa County, Arizona flipping Democratic in 2020, Suffolk was the most populous county in the nation to vote for Trump.

Suffolk County is represented by three New York congressional districts: the first, and parts of the second and third. The third is held by the Democratic Party, while the first and second are held by Republicans. Lee Zeldin represents the first district, which includes almost half of the county, from Smithtown to Montauk, including The Hamptons and Riverhead. The second district is represented by Republican Andrew Garbarino, and includes parts of southern Suffolk and Nassau counties. The third district is largely split between Nassau County and Suffolk County, and is represented by Tom Suozzi. A Democrat, Suozzi won the seat vacated by Steve Israel in 2016 after Israel declined to seek re-election. [ citation needed ]

As a whole both Suffolk and Nassau counties are considered swing counties. However, until 2016 they tended not to receive significant attention from presidential candidates, as the state of New York has turned reliably Democratic at the national level. In 2008 and 2012, Hofstra University in Nassau County hosted a presidential debate. Hofstra hosted the first debate of the 2016 presidential election season, on September 26, 2016, making Hofstra the first college or university in the United States to host a presidential debate in three consecutive elections. The presence on the 2016 ticket of Westchester County resident Hillary Clinton and Manhattan resident Donald Trump resulted in greater attention by the candidates to the concerns of Long Island. Trump visited Long Island voters and donors at least 4 times while Hillary made 1 stop for voters and 1 additional stop in the Hamptons for donors.

County Officials
Position Name Party Term
Sheriff Errol Toulon Jr. Dem 2018–Present
District Attorney Tim Sini Dem 2018–Present
County Clerk Judith A. Pascale Rep 2006–Present
Comptroller John M. Kennedy Jr. Rep 2015–Present

Suffolk County Executives

Suffolk County Executives
Name Party Term
H. Lee Dennison Democratic 1961–1973
John V.N. Klein Republican 1973–1979
Peter F. Cohalan Republican 1979–1986
Michael A. LoGrande * Republican 1986–1987
Patrick G. Halpin Democratic 1987–1991
Robert J. Gaffney Republican 1992–2003
Steve Levy** Democratic 2004–2010
Steve Levy** Republican 2010–2011
Steve Bellone Democratic 2012–present

* Appointed to complete Cohalan's term

** Levy was originally elected as a Democrat, but became a Republican in 2010.

Suffolk County Legislature

The county has 18 legislative districts, each represented by a legislator. As of 2020, there were 10 Democrats and 8 Republicans. The Partisan Voting Index is as of the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections:

District PVI 2020-2021 Legislature 2017-2018 Legislature 2015-2016 Legislature 2014-2015 Legislature 2012-2013 Legislature 2010-2011 Legislature 2008-2009 Legislature 2006-2007 Legislature 2004-2005 Legislature
1 R+8 Al Krupski (D) Al Krupski (D) Al Krupski (D) Al Krupski (D) Al Krupski (D) Edward P. Romaine (R) Edward P. Romaine (R) Edward P. Romaine (R) Micheal J. Caracciolo (R)
2 D+5 Bridget Fleming (D) Bridget Fleming (D) Bridget Fleming (D) Jay Schneiderman(DPO) (I) Jay Schneiderman(DPO) (I) Jay Schneiderman(DPO) (I) Jay Schneiderman (I) Jay Schneiderman (R) Jay Schneiderman (R)
3 R+2 Rudy A. Sunderman (R) Rudy A. Sunderman (R) Kate M. Browning (WF) Kate M. Browning (WF) Kate M. Browning (WF) Kate M. Browning (WF) Kate M. Browning (WF) Kate M. Browning (WF) Peter O'Leary (R)
4 R+7 Thomas Muratore (R) Thomas Muratore (R) Thomas Muratore (R) Thomas Muratore (R) Thomas Muratore (R) Thomas Muratore (R) Brian Beedenbender (D) Joseph T. Caracappa (R) Joseph T. Caracappa (R)
5 D+1 Kara Hahn (DPO)(D) Kara Hahn (MajL) (D) Kara Hahn (MajL) (D) Kara Hahn (D) Kara Hahn (D) Vivian Viloria-Fisher (D) Vivian Viloria-Fisher (D) Vivian Viloria-Fisher (D) Vivian Viloria-Fisher (D)
6 R+9 Sarah Anker (D) Sarah Anker (D) Sarah Anker (D) Sarah Anker (D) Sarah Anker (D) Daniel P. Losquadro (R)(MinL) / Sarah Anker (D) for 2011 Daniel P. Losquadro(MinL) (R) Daniel P. Losquadro(MinL) (R) Daniel P. Losquadro(MinL) (R)
7 D+1 Robert Calarco (PO/MajL) (D) Robert Calarco (DPO) (D) Robert Calarco (DPO) (D) Robert Calarco(MajL) (D) Robert Calarco(MajL) (D) Jack Eddington (I) Jack Eddington (I) Jack Eddington (D) Brian X. Foley (D)
8 R+9 Anthony Piccirillo (R) William J. Lindsay III (D) William J. Lindsay III (D) William J. Lindsay III (D) William J. Lindsay(PO) (D) William J. Lindsay(PO) (D) William J. Lindsay(PO) (D) William J. Lindsay(PO) (D) William J. Lindsay(PO) (D)
9 D+30 Samuel Gonzalez (D) Monica R. Martinez (D) Monica R. Martinez (D) Monica R. Martinez (D) Ricardo Montano (D) Ricardo Montano (D) Ricardo Montano (D) Ricardo Montano (D) Ricardo Montano (D)
10 R+9 Tom Cilmi (MinL) (R) Tom Cilmi (R) Tom Cilmi (R) Tom Cilmi (R) Tom Cilmi (R) Tom Cilmi (R) Cameron Alden (R) Cameron Alden (R) Cameron Alden (R)
11 R+7 Steven J. Flotteron (R) Steven J. Flotteron (R) Thomas F. Barraga (R) Thomas F. Barraga (R) Thomas F. Barraga (R) Thomas F. Barraga (R) Thomas F. Barraga (R) Thomas F. Barraga (R) Angie Carpenter (R)
12 R+12 Leslie Kennedy (R) Leslie Kennedy (R) Leslie Kennedy (R) John M. Kennedy, Jr.(MinL) (R) / Leslie Kennedy (R) for 2015 John M. Kennedy, Jr.(MinL) (R) John M. Kennedy, Jr. (R) John M. Kennedy, Jr. (R) John M. Kennedy, Jr. (R) John M. Kennedy, Jr. (R)
13 R+12 Robert Trotta (R) Robert Trotta (R) Robert Trotta (R) Robert Trotta (R) Lynne C. Nowick (R) Lynne C. Nowick (R) Lynne C. Nowick (R) Lynne C. Nowick (R) Lynne C. Nowick (R)
14 R+8 Kevin J. McCaffrey (R) Kevin J. McCaffrey (MinL) (R) Kevin J. McCaffrey(MinL) (R) Kevin J. McCaffrey (R) Wayne R. Horsley (PO) (D) Wayne R. Horsley (D) Wayne R. Horsley (D) Wayne R. Horsley (D) David Bishop (D)
15 D+18 Jason Richberg (D) DuWayne Gregory (PO) (D) DuWayne Gregory (PO) (D) DuWayne Gregory (PO) (D) DuWayne Gregory (D) DuWayne Gregory (D) Elie Mystal (D) / DuWayne Gregory (D) since July 29, 2008 Elie Mystal (D) Elie Mystal (D)
16 D+2 Susan A. Berland (D) Susan A. Berland (D) Steven H. Stern (D) Steven H. Stern (D) Steven H. Stern (D) Steven H. Stern (D) Steven H. Stern (D) Steven H. Stern (D) Allan Binder (R)
17 EVEN Tom Donnelly (D) Tom Donnelly (D) Louis D'Amaro (D) Louis D'Amaro (D) Louis D'Amaro (D) Louis D'Amaro (D) Louis D'Amaro (D) Louis D'Amaro (D) Paul J. Tonna (R)
18 D+1 William R. Spencer (MajL Until Arrest)(D) William R. Spencer (D) William R. Spencer (D) William R. Spencer (D) William R. Spencer (D) Jon Cooper (D) Jon Cooper (D) Jon Cooper (D) Jon Cooper (D)

Republicans controlled the county legislature until a landmark election in November 2005 where three Republican seats switched to the Democrats, giving them control. In November 2007, the Democratic Party once again retained control over the Suffolk County Legislature, picking up one seat in the process. In November 2009, the Republican Party regained the seat lost in 2007 but remained in the minority for the 2010-2011 session. In November 2011, the Democratic Party maintained control over the Suffolk County Legislature picking up one seat that had been held by an Independence Party member. In November 2013, the Republican Party gained the 14th district seat, but remains in the minority.

As of the 2020-2021 session, 7th district legislator Robert Calarco serves as Presiding Officer, a position he was elected to in 2020, 5th district legislator Kara serves as Deputy Presiding Officer. 18th district legislator William Spencer served as Majority Leader for the Democrats until his arrest for soliciting prostitution in a drugs for sex scandal Presiding Officer Calarco now holds the title. 10th district legislator Tom Cilmi is Minority Leader having assumed the office in 2019.

Law enforcement

Police services in the five western towns (Babylon, Huntington, Islip, Smithtown and Brookhaven) are provided primarily by the Suffolk County Police Department. The five "East End" towns (Riverhead, Southold, Shelter Island, East Hampton, and Southampton), maintain their own police and other law enforcement agencies. Also, there are a number of villages, such as Amityville, Lloyd Harbor, Northport, and Westhampton Beach that maintain their own police forces. In an unusual move, the Village of Greenport in 1994 voted to abolish its police department and turn responsibility for law and order over to the Southold Town Police Department.

After the Long Island State Parkway Police was disbanded in 1980, all state parkways in Suffolk County became the responsibility of Troop L of the New York State Police, headquartered at Republic Airport. State parks, such as Robert Moses State Park, are the responsibility of the New York State Park Police, based at Belmont Lake State Park. In 1996, the Long Island Rail Road Police Department was consolidated into the Metropolitan Transportation Authority Police, which has jurisdiction over all rail lines in the county. Since the New York state legislature created the New York State University Police in 1999, they are in charge of all law enforcement services for State University of New York property and campuses. The State University Police have jurisdiction in Suffolk County at Stony Brook University and Farmingdale State College.

The Suffolk County Sheriff's Office is a separate agency. The sheriff, an elected official who serves a four-year term, operates the two Suffolk County correctional facilities (in Yaphank and Riverhead), provides county courthouse security and detention, service and enforcement of civil papers, evictions and warrants. The Sheriff's Office is also responsible for securing all county-owned property, such as county government office buildings, as well as the campuses of the Suffolk County Community College. As of 2008, the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office employed 275 Deputy Sheriffs, 850 corrections officers, and about 200 civilian staff.

Suffolk County has a long maritime history with several outer barrier beaches and hundreds of square miles of waterways. The Suffolk Police Marine Bureau patrols the 500 square miles (1,000 km 2 ) of navigable waterways within the police district, from the Connecticut and Rhode Island state line which bisects Long Island Sound [32] to the New York state line 3 miles (5 km) south of Fire Island in the Atlantic Ocean. Some Suffolk County towns (Islip, Brookhaven, Southampton, East Hampton, Babylon, Huntington, Smithtown) also employ various bay constables and other local marine patrol, which are sworn armed peace officers with full arrest powers, providing back up to the Suffolk Police Marine Bureau as well as the United States Coast Guard.

This includes Fire Island and parts of Jones Island barrier beaches and the islands of the Great South Bay. Marine units also respond to water and ice rescues on the inland lakes, ponds, and streams of the District.

In February 2019, legislator Robert Trotta (R-Fort Salonga) put forward a resolution to recover salary and benefits from James Burke, the county's former police chief. [33] [34] Burke had pled guilty to beating a man while in police custody and attempting to conceal it, and the county had paid the victim $1.5 million in a settlement it had also paid Burke more than $500,000 in benefits and salary while Burke was concealing his conduct. [34] [33] Trotta said that the faithless servant doctrine in New York common law gave him the power to claw back the compensation. [34] The Suffolk County Legislature supported the suit unanimously. [35] The following month Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone signed the bill.

Courts

Suffolk County is part of the 10th Judicial District of the New York State Unified Court System is home to the Alfonse M. D'Amato Courthouse of the Federal U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York [36] and has various local municipal courts. The State Courts are divided into Supreme Court, which has general jurisdiction over all cases, and lower courts that either hear claims of a limited dollar amount, or of a specific nature. [37] [38] Similarly, the local courts hear claims of a limited dollar amount, or hear specific types of cases. The Federal Court has jurisdiction over Federal Claims, State Law claims that are joined with Federal claims, and claims where there is a diversity of citizenship. [39]

  • The Suffolk County Supreme Court is a trial court of unlimited general original jurisdiction, but it generally only hears cases that are outside the subject-matter jurisdiction of other trial courts of more limited jurisdiction. The Suffolk County Clerk is the Clerk of the Court of the Supreme Court.
  • The main courthouse for the Supreme Court is in Riverhead, which has been the court's home since 1729. The original courthouse was replaced in 1855, and that courthouse was expanded in 1881. [40] The courthouse was damaged by fire and rebuilt in 1929. In 1994, a new court building was added to the complex. This Courthouse was dedicated as the "Alan D. Oshrin Supreme Court Building" on August 1, 2011. [41]
  • The Supreme Court also shares space in the Cohalan Court Complex in Central Islip[42] with several other courts and county agencies. Matrimonial actions are heard in the Supreme Court, and those matters are generally heard in the Supreme Court section of the Cohalan Court Complex.
  • The Suffolk County Court is a trial court of limited jurisdiction. It has jurisdiction over all of Suffolk County, and is authorized to handle criminal prosecutions of both felonies and lesser offenses committed within the county, although in practice most minor offenses are handled by the local courts. It is the trial court for felonies, or where a person is indicted by a Grand Jury in Suffolk County. The County Court also has limited jurisdiction in civil cases, generally involving amounts up to $25,000. The County Court is in the Cromarty Court Complex Criminal Courts Building in Riverhead.
  • The Suffolk County Surrogate's Court hears cases involving the affairs of decedents, including the probate of wills and the administration of estates, guardianships, and adoptions. The Surrogate's Court is in the County Center in Riverhead.
  • The Suffolk County Family Court has jurisdiction over all of Suffolk County in petitions filed for Neglect & Abuse, Juvenile Delinquency/Designated Felonies, Persons in Need of Supervision, Adoption, Guardianship, Foster Care, Family Offense (Order of Protection), Custody & Visitation, Paternity, Support Matters (Child & Spousal), Consent to Marry. The court also has a Juvenile Drug Court and Family Treatment Court. Individuals, attorneys, and agencies may initiate a proceeding in the Family Court with the filing of a petition. The Suffolk County Family Court is in the Cohalan Court Complex in Central Islip[42] and maintains a facility in Riverhead. Case assignment is dependent upon the geographical location of the parties.

The District Court and the Town and Village Courts are the local courts of Suffolk County. There are more than 30 local courts, each with limited criminal and civil subject matter and geographic jurisdictions. The local criminal courts have trial jurisdiction over misdemeanors, violations and infractions preliminary jurisdiction over felonies and traffic tickets charging a crime. The local civil courts calendar small claims, evictions, and civil actions.

  • Suffolk County District Court has geographic jurisdiction over the 5 western towns of Suffolk County (Babylon, Brookhaven, Huntington, Islip & Smithtown). The Criminal division of the Suffolk District Court is in the Cohalan Court Complex, Central Islip, and includes Domestic Violence Courts, Drug Court, and a Mental Health Court. The Civil division is divided up in the 5 "outlying" courthouses in Lindenhurst, Huntington Station, Hauppauge, Ronkonkoma, and Patchogue. Civil actions may be filed up to $15,000, and small claims actions up to $5000. Actions are commenced by filing with the court. Summary proceedings under the RPAPL are filed in the district where the property is located.
  • The Town Courts of East Hampton, Riverhead, Shelter Island, Southampton, and Southold have geographic jurisdiction over the 5 eastern towns of Suffolk County. Each town maintains a courthouse where judges hear criminal cases (including a regional Drug Court) and civil actions. Civil actions are commenced by serving a summons and complaint for claims up to $3,000, and small claims actions are heard up to $3000. Summary proceedings under the RPAPL are filed in the town where the property is located.
  • The Village Courts of Amityville, Asharoken, Babylon, Belle Terre, Bellport, Brightwaters, Head of the Harbor, Huntington Bay, Islandia, Lake Grove, Lindenhurst, Lloyd Harbor, Nissequogue, Northport, Ocean Beach, Old Field, Patchogue, Poquott, Port Jefferson, Quogue, Sag Harbor, Saltaire, Shoreham, Southampton, Village of the Branch, West Hampton Dunes, and Westhampton Beach have geographic jurisdiction within each incorporated village. Criminal and civil subject matter jurisdiction varies in each court.

Most non-criminal moving violation tickets issued in the 5 west towns are handled by the Traffic Violations Bureau, which is part of the New York State Department of Motor Vehicles, not the court system.


Suffolk County LST-1173 - History

(LST-1163: dp. 2,440, 1. 384' b. 56', dr. 17', s. 13 k.
(tl.) cpl. 567 a. 3 3" cl. LST-1156)

Waldo County (LST-1163) was laid down in August 1952 at Pascagoula, Miss., by Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp. simply as LST-1163 launched on St. Patrick's Day 1953, sponsored by Mrs. C. Richard Shaeffner, and commissioned on 17 September 1953, Lt. Comdr. Robert H. Steinkellner in command.

LST-1168 departed Pascagoula on 14 October and steamed via Key West, Port Everglades, and Charleston to her permanent home port, the amphibious base at Little Creek, VA. She arrived at Little Creek on 25 October. Exercises and shakedown training occupied the remainder of 1953 and the first few months of 1954. On 14 June 1954, the tank landing ship departed Little Creek for Morehead City, N.C., to embark marines for amphibious exercises. She arrived at Morehead City on the 15th, loaded troops and equipment, and got underway on the 16th for Vieques Island located near Puerto Rico in the West Indies. The ship reached Vieques on 21 June and conducted amphibious training until 1 July when she headed back to Little Creek. She arrived at Little Creek on 5 July and remained there eight days before entering the Norfolk Naval Shipyard on 13 July. She left the shipyard on 6 August and returned to Little Creek to resume duty with the Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet. For the remainder of the year, LST-1163 conducted a series of amphibious exercises, mostly at Vieques in the West Indies, but she also participated in one cold weather exercise at Hamilton Inlet on the coast of Labrador in November.

On 18 January 1955, she entered the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard for her first major overhaul. She emerged from the yard, revitalized, on 20 May and resumed duty with the Amphibious Force. On 1 July 1955, LST-1163 became Waldo County (LST-1163). Through the summer of 1955, Waldo County remained close to or in Little Creek, however, on 24 August, she departed the Norfolk area for her first overseas deployment. After stops at Bordeaux in France, Port Lyautey in Morocco, and at Gibraltar, she joined the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean late in September. For the next four months, she ranged the length and breadth of the "middle sea," conducting 6th Fleet amphibious exercises and making port visits. On 25 January 1956, she departed Port Lyautey on her way home. The ship returned to Norfolk on 6 February and resumed operations with the 2d Fleet.

In her first two years of active service, Waldo County established a pattern of operations which endured until the end of 1964. She alternated five Mediterranean deployments with periods of duty out of Little Creek conducting amphibious training at such places as Vieques Island, Onslow Beach in North Carolina, and at various locations in the Canadian maritime provinces. During her second Mediterranean deployment, which lasted from August of 1957 to February of 1958, she acted as a unit of the contingency force established in the eastern Mediterranean during the civil unrest in Lebanon. The remaining three deployments were more routine in nature, consisting only of training missions and port visits. Between her third and fourth deployments to the 6th Fleet, she earned the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal in November and December of 1961 when she cruised Cuban waters as a part of another contingency force established in response to the wave of government terrorism which followed the abortive Bay of Pigs invasion. Otherwise, the periods between deployments consisted entirely of routine 2d Fleet operations, primarily amphibious training missions at the previously named locations.

Waldo County returned to Little Creek from her fifth and last Mediterranean cruise on 17 November 1964. At that point, she began a new phase of her career. No longer did she deploy to the 6th Fleet. For the remaining six years of her active career, the tank landing ship confined her operations to the Atlantic seaboard and the West Indies. The ubiquitous amphibious exercises predominated but, on two occasions, she did perform special missions. In May and June of 1965, she again earned the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal when she joined another contingency force in the West Indies during a period of extreme internal unrest in the Dominican Republic quelled by the intervention of forces of the Organization of American States. The following year, she qualified for that award again by returning to the island republic once more. From that time on, Waldo county broke her routine of Atlantic coast-West Indies operations only one time. In January 1970, she steamed to the Panama Canal and transited it for a brief series of landing exercises on the Pacific side of the isthmus. She retransited the canal on 2 February and resumed operations in the West Indies. Normal operations occupied her time until September at which time she began preparations for inactivation.

Waldo county was decommissioned sometime in October 1970, and she was berthed with the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Orange, Tex. She remained there until May of 1972 at which time she was reactivated for service with the Military Sealift Command (MSC). Operated by a civil service crew in a non-commissioned status, USNS Waldo County served with MSC only briefly, about 18 months. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1973, and she was transferred to the Maritime Administration for layup with its National Defense Fleet located at Suisun Bay, Calif. As of January 1980, she remained at Suisun Bay.


Notes

[1]Ruma Chopra, Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2011), Introduction.

[2]For the oath in New York City, see CO 5/1108, ff. 71–101, The National Archives, Kew for Kings County, see Henry Clinton papers, vol. 274, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan and for Suffolk County, see CO 5/1109, ff. 1–50, The National Archives, Kew. For other declarations of loyalty, which were separate from the oaths of allegiance, see, for instance, New-York Gazette and, the Weekly Mercury, April 17, November 11, 1776.

[3]Wallace Brown, The King’s Friends: The Composition and Motives of the American Loyalist Claimants (Providence: Brown University Press, 1965), 77–107 Wallace Brown, The Good Americans: The Loyalists in the American Revolution (New York: Morrow, 1969).

[4]For those whom the British government felt did not sufficiently prove their Loyalism, see “The Case of the Uncompensated Loyalists,” T 50/53, The National Archives, Kew.

[5]There are several critiques of Brown’s work. For a general criticism, see Eugene R. Fingerhut, “Uses and Abuses of the American Loyalists’ Claims: A Critique of Quantitative Analyses,” The William and Mary Quarterly 25, no. 2 (April 1, 1968): 245–58. For histrionic claims, see, for example, Claim of Samuel Embree, AO 13/12, ff. 334–388, The National Archives, Kew Claim of Paul Amberman, AO 13/24, ff. 2–6, The National Archives, Kew see also, Claim of William Waddell, Ibid., 362–374, The National Archives, Kew. For examples of witnesses’ statements, see Claim of Henry White, AO 12/24, ff. 95–104, The National Archives, Kew Claim of Archibald Hamilton, AO 12/30, ff. 1–9, The National Archives, Kew Claim of James Leadbetter, AO 13/65, ff. 44–58, 90, The National Archives, Kew.

[6]William H. Nelson, The American Tory (Boston: Beacon Press, 1964), 19 Paul H. Smith, “The American Loyalists: Notes on Their Organization and Numerical Strength,” The William and Mary Quarterly 25, no. 2 (April 1, 1968): 261 Stefan Bielinski, An American Loyalist: The Ordeal of Frederick Philipse III (Staatsburg, N.Y.: State of New York, New York State Parks & Recreation, Taconic State Park & Recreation Commission, 1976), 2 Chopra, Unnatural Rebellion, 1 Ruma Chopra, Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America (Plymouth: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2013), Introduction Maya Jasanoff, Liberty’s Exiles: The Loss of America and the Remaking of the British Empire (London: Harper Press, 2011), 8. For historians who drew upon Nelson’s central thesis on “conscious minorities,” see Janice Potter, The Liberty We Seek Loyalist Ideology in Colonial New York and Massachusetts (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1983), 17–19 Philip Ranlet, The New York Loyalists (Knoxville, TN.: University of Tennessee Press, 1986), 187 Leopold S. Launitz-Schürer, Loyal Whigs and Revolutionaries: The Making of the Revolution in New York, 1765–1776 (New York: New York University Press, 1980), 162–163, 175, 179 Ann Gorman Condon, The Loyalist Dream for New Brunswick: The Envy of the American States (Fredericton, N.B.: New Ireland Press, 1984), ix–x, 1 Benjamin H. Irvin, Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty: The Continental Congress and the People out of Doors (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011), chap. 2 Bernard Bailyn, The Ordeal of Thomas Hutchinson (Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1974).

[7]Lawrence L. Murray, “Feature Films and the American Revolution: A Bicentennial Reappraisal,” Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies 5, no. 3 (1975): 1–6 Nancy L. Rhoden, “Patriots, Villains, and the Quest for Liberty: How American Film Has Depicted the American Revolution,” Canadian Review of American Studies 37, no. 2 (2007): 205–38.

[8]For the historical uses of prosopography, see, in particular, Lawrence Stone, “Prosopography,” Daedalus, Historical Studies Today, 100, no. 1 (Winter 1971): 46–79. For the oath of allegiance, see CO 5/1109, ff. 1–50, The National Archives, Ke


USS Suffolk County (LST-1173)

El USS Suffolk County (LST-1173) fue un buque de desembarco de tanques clase De Soto County de la Armada de los Estados Unidos que sirvió entre 1957 y 1972.

Fue puesto en gradas el 15 de julio de 1955 en el Boston Navy Yard, donde luego fue botado el 5 de septiembre de 1956. [ 1 ] ​ Entró en servicio el 15 de agosto de 1957. [ 2 ] ​

Tenía un desplazamiento de 4164 t con carga ligera y 7100 t con carga completa. Su eslora alcanzaba los 135,6 m, una manga de 18,9 m y un calado de 5,3 m. [ 2 ] ​ Era propulsado por seis motores diésel Fairbanks-Morse de 13 700 bhp , que transmitían a dos hélices. Con ellos, alcanzaba una velocidad de 16,5 nudos. [ 2 ] ​ Su armamento consistía en seis cañones de Mk-33 de calibre 76 mm. [ 2 ] ​

Tras su entrada al servicio, se unió a la Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet. El buque invirtió toda su vida activa operando en la Costa Este de los Estados Unidos, en el mar Caribe y el Mediterráneo. [ 3 ] ​

Fue relevado del servicio el 25 de agosto de 1972. [ 1 ] ​ Para 1982, estaba en la reserva a la espera de la transferencia a otros países, junto al USS Lorain County y USS Wood County. [ 2 ] ​

  1. ab«USS Suffolk Country (LST-1173)». NavSource Online: Amphibious Photo Archive (en inglés) . Consultado el 8 de octubre de 2020 .
  2. abcde Moore, John, ed. (1981). Jane's Fighting Ships 1981-82 (en inglés) . Jane's Publishing Limited Company. p. 672. ISBN0-7106-0728-8. OCLC650231457.
  3. ↑«Suffolk County (LST-1173)». Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (en inglés) (Naval History and Heritage Command) . Consultado el 23 de diciembre de 2020 .

Este artículo incluye texto tomado o traducido del Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS), una obra del Comando de Historia y Patrimonio Naval (Naval History and Heritage Command) de la Armada de los Estados Unidos, que por ser parte del gobierno federal de los Estados Unidos está en el dominio público. La referencia se puede encontrar aquí.


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