New

History of Agwidale - History

History of Agwidale - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Agwidale

(ScStr: dp. 10,410; 1. 385'0"; b. 53'0"; dph. 30'; dr. 24'0"
(mean); s. 11 k.; cpl. 76; a. none)

While still under construction, the single-screw steel-hulled freighter Agwidale was acquired by the Navy from the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Va. near the end of the first World War and assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation service (NOTS). Commissioned at Newport News on 16 November 1918, Lt. Comdr. Maurice E Huntley, USNRF, in command, Agwidale shifted to the Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) Piers at Norfolk on the 24th, and there took on board a cargo of motor tractors. On 4 December 1918 she sailed for the Virginia capes, and at 1300 that day sighted a disabled seaplane off her port bow.

Agwidale altered course accordingly, and reached the downed Curtiss HS-2L flying boat soon thereafter, maneuvering to take the plane in tow. She apparently then headed back toward Hampton Roads, with the plane—still occupied by its three-man crew— travelingin tow astern. Eventually, at 1512the subchaser SC-195 came alongside and relieved the freighter of the towing chores to take the plane back to Hampton Roads.

Two days later, having returned to an anchorage off the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Agwidale set out for France, and reached La Pallice, en route to Rochefort, on 19 December. After discharging cargo at Rochefort, Agwidale, in ballast, set out for the United States on 29 January 1919. Mooring at Hoboken on the afternoon of 15 February, the cargoman cleared New York Harbor 10 days later, bound for Holland on her second and last voyage under the NOTS aegis
Agwidale reached Rotterdam via the British Isles on the afternoon of 12 March. She discharged her cargo over tee ensuing days, and, on the morning of the 21st, let go all lines and got underway to return to the tJnited States. She returned home without incident and tied up alongside Pier 15, Hoboken, shortly after noon on 4 April. Three days later, she received orders to prepare for decommissioning.

At noon on 11 April 1919, Agwidale was decommissioned and turned over to representatives of the United States Shipping Board, a civilian crew replacing a token Navy one the following afternoon. Agwidale retained her name for the rest of her days under American registry, which extended through the depression years and World War II. Initially operated by the Clyde Steamship Co., she later worked under the flag of the ClvdeMallory Line, and, still later, Agwilines Incorporated, until she was sold to Chinese interests in 1946 and renamed Wei Ming. Her subsequent fate is a mystery.


History of Agwidale - History

This is a complete list of all Newport News Shipbuilding production, listed in order by Newport News hull number. Small repair or overhaul jobs that were not assigned hull numbers are not included.

This list was compiled and is maintained by Andrew Toppan, using sources listed at the bottom of the document.

The first column is the Newport News hull number, followed by the vessel's name, the type/size/class of the vessel, the owner/customer for the vessel, the type of work done (new construction, overhaul, etc.), the date the vessel was delivered or commissioned, and the fate or status of the vessel. For ships that remain in existence the current name is listed in the status/fate column if no name is listed, the vessel retains its original name.

For US Navy vessels, the commissioning date is given for all others, the delivery date is given.

For conversions and reconditionings, the vessel's new name (at completion) is listed under "name", the original name and description are listed under "type", and the nature of the conversion is listed under "work type".

Newport News Production Record
Hull Name Type/Descr. Owner Work Type Delivered or Commissioned Fate or Status
1 Dorothy 90' Harbor Tug James Sheffield New 30 Apr 1891 Preserved @ NNSB&DD
2 El Toro 90' Harbor Tug Pacific Improvement Co. for Morgan Line New 20 May 1891 Scrapped 1982
3 El Sud El Sud Class 405' Freighter Pacific Improvement Co. for Morgan Line New 27 June 1892 Wrecked Sunk 15 Nov 1900
4 El Norte El Sud Class 405' Freighter Pacific Improvement Co. for Morgan Line New 15 Sept 1892 Wrecked Sunk 4 Dec 1908
5 El Rio El Sud Class 405' Freighter Pacific Improvement Co. for Morgan Line New 9 Feb 1892 Scrapped 1922
6 El Cid El Sud Class 405' Freighter Pacific Improvement Co. for Morgan Line New 24 Aug 1893 Scrapped 1933
7 Nashville
(PG 7)
Nashville Class Gunboat US Navy New 19 Aug 1897 Barged 1920's Scrapped 1957
8 Wilmington
(PG 8)
Wilmington Class Gunboat US Navy New 13 May 1897 Scuttled 1947
9 Helena
(PG 9)
Wilmington Class Gunboat US Navy New 8 July 1897 Scrapped 1934
10 Twin City Ferry Unknown New
(Machinery)
15 Mar 1894 Unknown
11 Louisiana 349' Freighter Unknown New
(Machinery)
12/1894 Unknown
12 John H. Estill 130' Pilot Tug Savannah Pilots Association New 25 Nov 1894 Scrapped 1952
13 Albert F. Dewey 95' Harbor Tug Albert F. Dewey New 15 Apr 1895 Unknown Last reported 1941
14 Newport News 247' Bay Passenger Steamer Norfolk & Washington Steamboat Co. New 15 June 1895 Burned 26 Jan 1924 Scrapped
15 La Grande Duchesse 404' Passenger Steamer Plant Investment Co. New Completed 11/1896 delivered 9 Apr 1898 Torpedoed 2 June 1918
16 Creole 375' Passenger Steamer Cromwell Steamship Co. New 5 Dec 1896 Scrapped 1930
17 Sommers N. Smith 118' Pilot Tug Pilots' Benevolent Association New 14 Sept 1896 Scrapped 1937
18 Kearsarge
(BB 5)
Kearsarge Class Battleship US Navy New 20 Feb 1900 Scrapped 1955
19 Kentucky
(BB 6)
Kearsarge Class Battleship US Navy New 15 May 1900 Scrapped 1923
20 Margaret 182' Coastal Passenger Steamer Plant Investment Co. New 14 Oct 1896 Sunk 12 Mar 1924
21 Illinois
(BB 7)
Illinois Class Battleship US Navy New 16 Sept 1901 Scrapped 1956
22 El Sud El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 26 July 1899 Scrapped 1935
23 El Norte El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 14 Sept 1899 Scrapped 1934
24 El Rio El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 19 Oct 1899 Collision 13 Jan 1945
25 Missouri
(BB 11)
Maine Class Battleship US Navy New 1 Dec 1903 Scrapped 1922
26 Arkansas
(BM 7)
Arkansas Class Harbor Defense Monitor US Navy New 28 Oct 1902 Scrapped 1922
27 El Cid El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 16 Dec 1899 Scrapped 1934
28 Comus 405' Passenger Steamer Cromwell Steamship Co. New 28 Apr 1900 Scrapped 1934
29 Proteus 405' Passenger Steamer Cromwell Steamship Co. New 6 June 1900 Collision 18 Aug 1918
30 El Amigo 100' Harbor Tug Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 9 Sept 1899 Collision 2 Oct 1948 Scrapped 1950
31 Korea 571' Passenger Steamer Pacific Mail Steamship Co. New 17 June 1902 Scrapped 1934
32 Siberia 571' Passenger Steamer Pacific Mail Steamship Co. New 19 Nov 1902 Scrapped 1934
33 -- Drydock Caisson - Dock#2 Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. New circa 1901 Discarded 1959
34 El Valle El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 5 June 1901 Scrapped 1951
35 El Dia El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 15 Sept 1901 Scrapped 1953
36 El Siglo El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 30 Nov 1901 Scrapped 1934
37 El Alba El Sud Class 405' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Morgan Line New 29 Jan 1902 Scrapped 1934
38 West Virginia
(ACR-5)
Pennsylvania Class Armored Cruiser US Navy New 23 Feb 1905 Scrapped 1930
39 Maryland
(ACR-9)
Pennsylvania Class Armored Cruiser US Navy New 18 Apr 1905 Scrapped 1930
40 Virginia
(BB 13)
Virginia Class Battleship US Navy New 7 May 1906 Target 5 Sept 1923
41 Charleston
(C-22)
St. Louis Class Protected Cruiser US Navy New 17 Oct 1905 Scrapped 1930
42 Monroe 366' Passenger Steamer Old Dominion Steamship Co. New 3 Apr 1903 Collision 30 Jan 1914
43 Francis H. Leggett 258' Lumber Freighter Hammond Lumber Co. New 21 Apr 1903 Storm Loss 18 Sept 1914
44 W.S. Porter 399' Tanker Saginaw Oil Co./Associated Oil Co. New 1 Nov 1906 War Loss 8/1944
45 Louisiana
(BB 19)
Connecticut Class Battleship US Navy New 2 June 1906 Scrapped 1924
46 Minnesota
(BB 22)
Connecticut Class Battleship US Navy New 9 Mar 1907 Scrapped 1924
47 Scranton 231' Harbor Ferry Hoboken Ferry Co. New 31 Jan 1905 Storm Loss 1968 Scrapped
48 Elmira 231' Harbor Ferry Hoboken Ferry Co. New 24 Jan 1905 Scrapped 1983
49 Binghamton 231' Harbor Ferry Hoboken Ferry Co. New 25 Mar 1905 Restaurant, Edgewater, NJ
50 Scandinavia 231' Harbor Ferry Hoboken Ferry Co. New 24 Apr 1905 Abandoned 1967 Scrapped circa 1980
51 --
( Bychock )
73' Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for Russian Navy New 17 Oct 1904 Scrapped 1913
52 --
( Kefal' )
73' Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for Russian Navy New 17 Oct 1904 Scrapped 1913
53 Simon Lake X
( Sig )
73' Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for Russian Navy New 23 Feb 1905 Scrapped 1915
54 --
(Paltus)
73' Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for Russian Navy New 2 Jan 1905 Scrapped 1913
55 --
(Plotva)
73' Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for Russian Navy New 2 Jan 1905 Scrapped 1913
56 Simon Lake XV 85' Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for Russian Navy New 27 Feb 1906 Unknown
57 North Carolina
(ACR-12)
Tennessee Class Armored Cruiser US Navy New 7 May 1908 Scrapped 1931
58 Montana
(ACR-13)
Tennessee Class Armored Cruiser US Navy New 21 July 1908 Scrapped 1935
59 Buffalo Lighter Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 1905 Unknown
60 Syracuse Lighter Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 1905 Unknown
61 Jamestown 262' Bay Passenger Steamer Norfolk & Washington Steamboat Co. New 20 June 1906 Barged 1930 Fate Unknown
62 Ithaca 232' Harbor Ferry Delware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 9 Sept 1906 Burned 11 Aug 1945 Scrapped
63 -- Drydock Caisson - Dock#3 Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. New circa 1908 Discarded 1967
64 Sun 405' Tanker Sun Co. New 8 Apr 1907 War Loss 1943
65 Brazos 416' Passenger Steamer New York & Texas Steamship Co. New 6 Nov 1907 Scrapped 1934
66 -- Car Float Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 1907 Unknown
67 -- Car Float Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 1907 Unknown
68 -- Car Float Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 1907 Unknown
75 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1907 Unknown
70 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1907 Unknown
71 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1907 Unknown
72 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1907 Unknown
73 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1907 Unknown
74 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1907 Unknown
75 Cayo Piedra 125' Dipper Dredge American Locomotive Co. for Republic of Cuba New 3 Apr 1907 Unknown
76 -- -- -- New -- Not Built
77 -- Car Float New York, New Haven & Hartford RR New 1907 Unknown
78 -- Car Float New York, New Haven & Hartford RR New 1907 Unknown
79 George W. Fenwick 295' Lumber Freighter Hammond Lumber Co. New 28 Jan 1908 Torpedoed 6 June 1942
80 Nann Smith 295' Lumber Freighter C.A. Smith Timber Co. New 12 Dec 1907 War Loss 1917
81 Lurine 437' Passenger/Freight Steamer Matson Navigation Co. New 18 Mar 1908 Scrapped 1953
82 Texas 413' Tanker Texas Co. New 18 July 1908 Wrecked 20 Nov 1927
83 Corning 101' Harbor Tug Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 18 Mar 1908 Extant 1980's ( Bisso ) Probably Scrapped 1986
84 Bath 101' Harbor Tug Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR New 9 Apr 1908 In Service
85 Seneca 204' Cutter US Revenue Cutter Service New 6 Nov 1908 Scrapped 1950
86 Delaware
(BB 28)
Delaware Class Battleship US Navy New 4 Apr 1910 Scrapped 1924
87 Clatsop 183' Suction Dredge US War Department for Army Corps of Engineers New 2 Sept 1908 Scrapped 1961
88 Achushnet 152' Patrol Tug US Revenue Cutter Service New 6 Nov 1808 Scrapped 1946
89 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
90 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
91 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
92 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
93 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
94 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
95 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
96 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
97 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
98 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
99 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
100 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
101 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
102 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
103 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
104 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
105 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
106 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
107 Southland 305' Bay Passenger Steamer Norfolk & Washington Steamboat Co. New 15 Feb 1909 Probably Scrapped 1955
108 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
109 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
110 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
111 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
112 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
113 -- Dump Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1908 Unknown
114 Joseph Henry 167' Cable Layer US War Department for US Army Signal Corps New 31 Mar 1909 Preserved @ Piraeus, Greece ( Thalis O. Milissos )
115 Roe
(DD 24)
Roe Class Destroyer US Navy New 17 Sept 1910 Scrapped 1934
116 Terry
(DD 25)
Roe Class Destroyer US Navy New 18 Oct 1910 Scrapped 1934
117 Jean Jean Class 328' Freighter A.H. Bull & Co. New 2 Aug 1909 Scrapped 1954
118 John Twohy, Jr. 103' Harbor Tug Twohy Tow Boat Co. (Lambert's Point Tow Boat Co.) New 15 May 1909 Scrapped 1970
119 Seal/G-1
(SS 19 1/2)
G-1 Class Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for US Navy New 29 July 1911 Target 21 June 1921
120 Tuna/G-2
(SS 27)
G-1 Class Submarine Lake Torpedo Boat Co. for US Navy New 15 May 1912 Sunk 30 July 1919
121 Wilhelmina 451' Passenger/Freight Steamer Matson Navigation Co. New 7 Dec 1909 Torpedoed 2 Dec 1940
122 -- Tank Barge Standard Oil Co. New 1909 Unknown
123 -- Tank Barge Standard Oil Co. New 1909 Unknown
123 -- Tank Barge Standard Oil Co. New 1909 Unknown
125 Bear 380' Passenger Steamer Union Pacific RR New 23 Jan 1910 Wrecked 14 June 1911
126 Beaver 380' Passenger Steamer Union Pacific RR New 13 Nov 1910 Scrapped 1952
127 City of Montgomery 397' Passenger Steamer Ocean Steamship Co. (Savannah Line) New 25 May 1910 Scrapped 1947
128 City of St. Louis 397' Passenger Steamer Ocean Steamship Co. (Savannah Line) New 15 June 1910 Scrapped 1946
129 J.A. Chanslor 400' Tanker Associated Oil Co. New 24 Mar 1910 Wrecked & Sunk 19 Dec 1919
130 El Sol El Sol Class 430' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Atlantic Steamship Lines New 20 Aug 1910 Collision 11 Mar 1927 Scrapped
131 El Mundo El Sol Class 430' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Atlantic Steamship Lines New 25 Sept 1910 Scrapped 1947
132 El Oriente El Sol Class 430' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Atlantic Steamship Lines New 24 Oct 1910 Scrapped 1947
133 El Occidente El Sol Class 430' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. for Atlantic Steamship Lines New 2 Dec 1910 War Loss 13 Apr 1942
134 Monaghan
(DD 32)
Monaghan Class Destroyer US Navy New 21 June 1911 Scrapped 1934
135 Ruth Jean Class 328' Freighter A.H. Bull & Co. New 8 Aug 1910 Scrapped 1933
136 Madison 373' Passenger Steamer Old Dominion Steamship Co. New 31 Jan 1911 Scrapped 1947
137 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1910 Unknown
138 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1910 Unknown
139 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1910 Unknown
140 -- Rock Barge Istbmian Canal Commission New 1910 Unknown
141 Wm. F. Herrin 400' Tanker Associated Oil Co. New 20 Mar 1911 Scrapped 1950
142 Corozal Corozal Class 347' Freighter New York & Porto Rico Co. New 19 Feb 1911 Probably Scrapped 1958
143 Montoso Corozal Class 347' Freighter New York & Porto Rico Co. New 5 Mar 1911 Scrapped 1953
144 Fanning
(DD 37)
Monaghan Class Destroyer US Navy New 21 June 1912 Scrapped 1934
145 Isabela Corozal Class 347' Freighter New York & Porto Rico Co. New 25 Aug 1911 War Loss 19 May 1942
146 Hilton Jean Class 328' Freighter A.H. Bull & Co. New 8 July 1911 Barged 1935 Scrapped 1951
147 Texas
(BB 35)
New York Class Battleship US Navy New 18 Dec 1912 Preserved @ Houston
148 -- Bridge Caisson Penn Bridge Co. New 29 Dec 1911 --
149 -- Dump Scow Coastwise Dredging Co. New 1911 Unknown
150 Carolina 130' River Passenger Steamer Albemarle Steam Navigation Co. New 4 Nov 1911 Scrapped circa 1974
151 Virginia 115' River Passenger Steamer Albemarle Steam Navigation Co. New 19 Nov 1911 Burned 1939 Barged 1941 Lost 4 Oct 1942
152 Miami Miami Class Cutter US Revenue Cutter Service New 19 Aug 1912 Torpedoed 26 Sept 1918
153 Unalga Miami Class Cutter US Revenue Cutter Service New 23 May 1912 Scrapped 1946
154 Proteus
(AC 9)
Proteus Class Fleet Collier US Navy New 9 July 1913 Lost 11/1941
155 Nereus
(AC 10)
Proteus Class Fleet Collier US Navy New 10 Sept 1913 Lost 10/1941
156 Evelyn Jean Class 328' Freighter A.H. Bull & Co. New 11 June 1912 Scrapped 1946
157 Lenape 399' Passenger Steamer Clyde Steamship Co. New 18 Jan 1913 Burned 18 Nov 1925 Scrapped
158 Carolyn Jean Class 328' Freighter A.H. Bull & Co. New 30 July 1912 Torpedoed 27 Mar 1942
159 Adeline Smith 310' Lumber Freighter C.A. Smith Timber Co. New 27 Nov 1912 Scrapped 1947
160 C&O Float #1 Carfloat Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1912 Unknown
161 Peter H. Crowell Jean Class 328' Freighter Crowell & Thurlow Co. New 21 Dec 1912 Scrapped 1939
162 Illinois 413' Tanker Texas Co. New 17 May 1913 Torpedoed 8 Mar 1917
163 Lorenzo Corozal Class 347' Freighter New York & Porto Rico Co. New 19 Feb 1913 Torpedoed 8 June 1918
164 Ammunition Lighter #24 Ammunition Lighter US Navy New 1912 Unknown
165 Tamesi Tank Barge Southern Pacific Co. New 1913 Unknown
166 Matsonia 501' Passenger Steamer Matson Navigation Co. New 6 Nov 1913 Scrapped 1957
167 Topila Topila Class 395' Tanker East Coast Oil Co. (Southern Pacific Co.) New 22 July 1913 Scrapped 1950
168 Manoa 446' Passenger/Freight Steamer Matson Navigation Co. New 13 Dec 1913 Extant 1985 as a Repair Hulk @ Vladivostock
169 Lewis K. Thurlow Jean Class 328' Freighter Crowell & Thurlow Co. New 14 Nov 1913 Barged 1937 Scrapped 1951
170 John D. Archbold Archbold Class 474' Tanker Standard Oil Co. New 17 Mar 1914 Torpedoed 16 June 1917
171 Pennsylvania
(BB 38)
Pennsylvania Class Battleship US Navy New 12 June 1916 Target 10 Feb 1948
172 Carolina 404' Passenger Steamer New York & Porto Rico Co. Re-engine & Recondition 1 Mar 1914 Torpedoed 2 June 1918
173 Oil Barge #5 Tank Barge US Navy New 1914 Unknown
174 Oil Barge #6 Tank Barge US Navy New 1914 Unknown
175 Neches 420' Freighter Mallory Steamship Co. New 20 Aug 1914 Collision 1918
176 Medina 420' Freighter Mallory Steamship Co. New 29 Sept 1914 In Service ( Doulos )
177 John D. Rockefeller Archbold Class 474' Tanker Standard Oil Co. New 11 Sept 1914 Scrapped 1954
178 -- Dump Scow Dunbar & Sullivan Dredging Co. New 1914 Unknown
179 -- Dump Scow Dunbar & Sullivan Dredging Co. New 1914 Unknown
180 -- Dump Scow Dunbar & Sullivan Dredging Co. New 1914 Unknown
181 -- Dump Scow Dunbar & Sullivan Dredging Co. New 1914 Unknown
182 Edward Pierce Pierce Class 375' Collier Crowell & Thurlow Co. New 6 Nov 1914 Scrapped 1949
183 Ossipee Ossippe Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 28 July 1915 Scrapped 1949
184 Tallapoosa Ossippe Class Cutter US Coast Guard New 12 Aug 1915 Unknown Last Reported circa 1993 ( Santa Maria )
185 Mississippi
(BB 41)
New Mexico Class Battleship US Navy New 18 Dec 1917 Scrapped 1957
186 Charles Pratt Pratt Class 516' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 18 Mar 1916 Torpedoed 22 Dec 1940
187 H.H. Rogers Pratt Class 516' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 25 May 1916 Torpedoed 21 Feb 1943
188 Mariana Corozal Class 347' Freighter New York & Porto Rico Co. New 3 July 1915 War Loss 6 Mar 1942
189 Walter D. Noyes Pierce Class 375' Collier Crowell & Thurlow Co. New 29 July 1915 Barged 1949 Scrapped 1951
190 Edgar F. Luckenbach 442' Freighter Luckenbach Steamship Co. New 10 May 1916 Collision 21 July 1939 Scrapped
191 Antwerpen Archbold Class 474' Tanker American Petroleum Co./Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 24 Aug 1916 War Loss 12 Sept 1916
192 Stephen R. Jones Pierce Class 375' Collier Crowell & Thurlow Co. New 11 Nov 1915 Wrecked 28 June 1942 Demolished
193 Henry R. Mallory 440' Passenger/Freight Steamer Mallory Steamship Co. New 21 Oct 1916 Torpedoed 7 Feb 1943
194 Munalbro Pierce Class 375' Collier Munson Steamship Co. New 25 May 1916 Barged 1948 Scrapped 1954
195 Standard 545' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ Recondition & Modify 18 Feb 1916 Scrapped 1954
196 Wm. G. Warden Pratt Class 516' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 2 Feb 1917 Scrapped 1947
197 F.Q. Barstow Pratt Class 516' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 12 Apr 1917 Scrapped 1946
198 William A. McKenney 410' Freighter Crowell & Thurlow Co. New 29 Nov 1916 Torpedoed 4 Oct 1942
199 Felix Taussig 410' Freighter Crowell & Thurlow Co. New 14 Feb 1917 Scrapped 1954
200 Mundelta Mundelta Class 385' Freighter Munson Steamship Co. New 18 Apr 1917 Probable War Loss 9/1944
201 O.B. Jennings Pratt Class 516' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 31 Oct 1917 Torpedoed 4 Aug 1918
202 Torres Topila Class 395' Tanker Southern Pacific Co. New 28 June 1917 Scrapped 1950
203 El Almirante 380' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. New 2 August 1917 Collision & Storm Loss 20 Apr 1943
204 El Capitan 380' Freighter Southern Pacific Co. New 20 Sept 1917 Bombed 9-10 July 1942
205 J.C. Donnell Pratt Class 516' Tanker Atlantic Refining Co. New 21 Jan 1918 Scrapped 1947
206 Munindies Mundelta Class 385' Freighter Munson Steamship Co. New 7 Dec 1917 Mined 11/1939
207 Munaires Mundelta Class 385' Freighter Munson Steamship Co. New 22 Jan 1918 Torpedoed 28 Sept 1942
208 H.M. Flagler Flagler Class 478' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 17 July 1918 Scrapped 1949
209 F.D. Asche Flagler Class 478' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 10 Dec 1918 Scrapped 1959
210 Maryland
(BB 46)
Colorado Class Battleship US Navy New 21 July 1921 Scrapped 1959
211 West Virginia Colorado Class Battleship US Navy New 1 Dec 1923 Scrapped 1961
212 Agwidale Mundelta Class 385' Freighter Atlantic, Gulf, & West Indies Co. New 16 Nov 1918 Scrapped 1960
213 Agwistar Mundelta Class 385' Freighter Atlantic, Gulf, & West Indies Co. New 17 Feb 1919 Scrapped 1953
214 -- 398' Freighter Ocean Steamship Co. New -- Cancelled
215 Constellation
(CC 2)
Lexington Class Battlecruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 17 Aug 1923
216 Ranger
(CC 4)
Lexington Class Battlecruiser US Navy New -- Cancelled 17 Aug 1923
217 Lamberton
(DD 119)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 22 Aug 1918 Scrapped 1947
218 Radford
(DD 120)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 5 Apr 1918 Scuttled 1936
219 Montgomery
(DD 121)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 26 July 1918 Scrapped 1946
220 Breese
(DD 122)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 23 Oct 1918 Scrapped 1946
221 Gamble
(DD 123)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 29 Nov 1918 Bombed 18 Feb 1945 Scuttled 16 July 1945
222 Ramsay
(DD 124)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 15 Feb 1919 Scrapped 1946
223 Hopewell
(DD 181)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 8 June 1918 Torpedoed 19 Aug 1941
224 Thomas
(DD 182)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 25 Apr 1919 Scrapped 1949
225 Haraden
(DD 193)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 7 June 1919 Scrapped 1945
226 Abbot
(DD 184)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 19 July 1919 Scrapped 1945
227 Bagley
(DD 185)
Wickes Class Destroyer US Navy New 27 Aug 1919 Scrapped 1945
228 Clemson
(DD 186)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 29 Dec 1919 Scrapped 1946
229 Dahlgren
(DD 187)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 6 Jan 1920 Scrapped 1946
230 Goldsborough
(DD 188)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 26 Jan 1920 Scrapped 1946
231 Semmes
(DD 189)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 21 Feb 1920 Scrapped 1947
232 Satterlee
(DD 190)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 23 Dec 1919 Torpedoed 31 Jan 1942
233 Mason
(DD 191)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 28 Feb 1920 Torpedoed 18 Oct 1941
234 Graham
(DD 192)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 13 Mar 1920 Scrapped 1922
235 Abel P. Upshur
(DD 193)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 23 Nov 1920 Scrapped 1945
236 Hunt
(DD 194)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 30 Sept 1920 Scrapped 1945
237 Welborn C. Wood
(DD 195)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 14 Jan 1921 Scrapped 1947
238 George E. Badger
(DD 196)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 23 July 1920 Scrapped 1946
239 Branch
(DD 197)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 26 July 1920 Torpedoed 11 Apr 1943
240 Herndon
(DD 198)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 14 Sept 1920 Torpedoed 16 Jan 1945
241 Dallas
(DD 199)
Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New 29 Oct 1920 Scrapped 1945
242 DD 200 Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New -- Cancelled 3 Feb 1919
243 DD 201 Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New -- Cancelled 3 Feb 1919
244 DD 202 Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New -- Cancelled 3 Feb 1919
245 DD 203 Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New -- Cancelled 3 Feb 1919
246 DD 204 Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New -- Cancelled 3 Feb 1919
247 DD 205 Clemson Class Destroyer US Navy New -- Cancelled 3 Feb 1919
248 Patoka
(AO 9)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 3 Sept 1919 Scrapped 1948
249 Ramapo
(AO 12)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 22 Oct 1919 Scrapped 1954
250 Rapidan
(AO 18)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 26 Nov 1919 Scrapped 1947
251 Hudsonian
(AO 19)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 13 May 1920 Scrapped 1960
252 Sapelo
(AO 11)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 30 Jan 1920 Scrapped 1946
253 Fleetco
(AO 20)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 27 May 1920 Scrapped 1947
254 Tippecanoe
(AO 21)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 4 Aug 1920 Scrapped 1947
255 Trinity
(AO 13)
Patoka Class 478' Tanker Emergency Fleet Corp. for US Navy New 4 Sept 1920 Scrapped 1954
256 Golden State 535' Passenger/Freight Liner Emergency Fleet Corp. for Pacific Steamship Co. New 1 Feb 1921 Torpedoed 12 Nov 1942
257 Silver State 535' Passenger/Freight Liner Emergency Fleet Corp. for Pacific Steamship Co. New 16 May 1921 Scrapped 1948
258 Iowa
(BB 53)
South Dakota Class Battleship US Navy New -- Cancelled 17 Aug 1923
259 Agwistone Pratt Class 516' Tanker Atlantic, Gulf, & West Indies Co. New 26 July 1922 Scrapped 1949
260 Agwismith Pratt Class 516' Tanker Atlantic, Gulf, & West Indies Co. New 26 July 1922 Scrapped 1954
261 John D. Archbold 572' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 24 Sept 1921 Scrapped 1962
261 Wm. Rockefeller 572' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 9 Nov 1921 Torpedoed 28 June 1942
263 Dolphin 181' Yacht Mortimer L. Schiff New 2 June 1922 Wrecked 24 May 1960
264 Leviathan 950' Troopship United States Lines Reconversion to Passenger Liner 16 May 1923 Scrapped 1938
265 Ohio 172' Yacht Edward W. Scripps New 16 Nov 1922 Wrecked 1953
266 City of Chattanooga 401' Passenger Steamer Ocean Steamship Co. (Savannah Line) New 28 Sept 1923 Scrapped 1948
267 City of Birmingham 401' Passenger Steamer Ocean Steamship Co. (Savannah Line) New 3 Nov 1923 Torpedoed 30 June 1942
268 U.S.E.D. No. 27 Dump Scow US War Department New 1924 Unknown
269 U.S.E.D. No. 28 Dump Scow US War Department New 1924 Unknown
270 U.S.E.D. No. 29 Dump Scow US War Department New 1924 Unknown
271 U.S.E.D. No. 30 Dump Scow US War Department New 1924 Unknown
272 Republic 615' Troopship United States Lines Reconversion to Passenger Liner 11 Apr 1924 Scrapped 1952
273 J.H. Senior 220' Powered Tank Barge Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 23 Feb 1924 Hulked 1960's Scrapped 1973
274 Cherokee Cherokee Class 402' Passenger Steamer Clyde Steamship Co. New 17 June 1925 Torpedoed 15 June 1942
275 Seminole Cherokee Class 402' Passenger Steamer Clyde Steamship Co. New 19 Aug 1925 Scrapped 1952
276 George Washington 276' Passenger Steamer Old Dominion Line New 16 Nov 1924 Scrapped 1955
277 Robert E. Lee 276' Passenger Steamer Old Dominion Line New 17 Jan 1925 Torpedoed 30 June 1942
278 H.T. Co. No. 1 Coal Barge Newport News & Hampton Roads Gas & Electric Co. New 1924 Unknown
279 H.T. Co. No. 2 Coal Barge Newport News & Hampton Roads Gas & Electric Co. New 1924 Unknown
280 Coamo 429' Passenger Steamer New York & Porto Rico Co. New 22 Dec 1925 Torpedoed 9 Dec 1942
281 Nenemoosha 130' Yacht Alfred I. DuPont New 15 Feb 1925 Unknown Last Reported 1950's
282 Norfolk 162' Hydraulic Dredge Barge Atlantic Gulf & Pacific Co. New 1 June 1925 Unknown Last Reported 1946
283 C&O Barge No. 1 Freight Barge Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1925 Unknown
284 C&O Barge No. 2 Freight Barge Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1925 Unknown
285 U.S.E.D. No. 13 Barge (Hull Only) US War Department New
(Hull)
1925 Unknown
286 U.S.E.D. No. 14 Barge (Hull Only) US War Department New
(Hull)
1925 Unknown
287 Mohawk Cherokee Class 402' Passenger Steamer Clyde Steamship Co. New 1 Feb 1926 Collision 24 Jan 1935
288 Chatham 368' Passenger Steamer Merchant & Miners Transportation Co. New 17 May 1926 Torpedoed 25 Aug 1942
289 Dorchester 368' Passenger Steamer Merchant & Miners Transportation Co. New 17 July 1925 Torpedoed 3 Feb 1943
290 Fairfax 368' Passenger Steamer Merchant & Miners Transportation Co. New 4 Sept 1926 Scrapped 1957
291 25-1 Barge (Hull Only) US War Department New
(Hull)
1925 Unknown
292 Raymond 177' Hydraulic Dredge US War Department for Army Corps of Engineers New 5 Sept 1926 Scrapped 1980
293 Pawnee 160' Yacht Harry P. Bingham New 15 Jan 1926 Extant 1980's @ Bahamas ( Andro )
294 P.R.R. No. 18 105' Harbor Tug
(Hull Only)
Pennsylvania RR Co. New
(Hull)
11 Nov 1925 Scrapped 1970
295 P.R.R. No. 26 105' Harbor Tug
(Hull Only)
Pennsylvania RR Co. New
(Hull)
19 Nov 1925 Scuttled 1982
296 -- Tank Barge Arundel Corp. New 1925 Unknown
297 -- Tank Barge Arundel Corp. New 1925 Unknown
298 -- Tank Barge Arundel Corp. New 1925 Unknown
299 -- 80' Hydraulic Dredge Barge (Hull Only) R.B. Knox for Duluth Superior Dredging Co. and Florida & Southern Dreding Co. New
(Hull)
4 Sept 1925 Unknown
300 P.R.R. No. 804 Grain Barge Pennsylvania RR Co. New 1925 Unknown
301 P.R.R. No. 805 Grain Barge Pennsylvania RR Co. New 1925 Unknown
302 No. 825 Barge US War Department New 1925 Unknown
303 Savarona 185' Yacht Richard M. Cadwalader New 1 Oct 1926 Scuttled 4/1968
304 Arcadia 188' Yacht Galen L. Stone New 1 Sept 1926 Scrapped 1969
305 Josephine 140' Yacht E.S. Burke, Jr. New 19 June 1926 Scrapped circa 1952
306 Iroquois 409' Passenger Steamer Clyde Steamship Co. New 18 Apr 1927 Scrapped 1981
307 Shawnee 409' Passenger Steamer Clyde Steamship Co. New 14 July 1927 Burned 9/1949 Scrapped
308 Aras 162' Yacht Hugh J. Chisholm New 11 June 1926 Burned 13 Dec 1930
309 -- Freight Barge Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1926 Unknown
310 -- Freight Barge Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1926 Unknown
311 -- Freight Barge Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1926 Unknown
312 -- Carfloat Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1926 Unknown
313 P.R.R. No. 15 80' Double-End Docking Tug
(Hull Only)
Pennsylvania RR Co. New
(Hull)
30 May 1926 Scrapped 1972
314 P.R.R. No. 20 80' Double-End Docking Tug
(Hull Only)
Pennsylvania RR Co. New
(Hull)
30 May 1926 Scrapped 1976
315 California California Class 601' Passenger Liner International Mercantile Marine New 13 Jan 1928 Scrapped 1964
316 Robador 161' Yacht Robert Law, Jr. New 17 Aug 1926 Scrapped 1956
317 Algonquin 402' Passenger Steamer Clyde Steamship Co. New 10 Dec 1926 Scrapped 1956
318 Northland 217' Arctic Patrol Cutter US Coast Guard New 7 May 1927 Scrapped 1962
319 Caracas 336' Passenger Steamer Red "D" Line New 27 Aug 1927 Scrapped 1961
320 No. 9 Barge US War Department New 1927 Unknown
321 Monarch II Barge Merritt-Chapman New 1927 Unknown
322 America 687' Passenger/Freight Liner United States Lines Repair & Recondition 3 March 1928 Scrapped 1957
323 Houston
(CL 30)
Northampton Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 17 June 1930 War Loss 1 Mar 1942
324 Augusta
(CL 31)
Northampton Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 30 Jan 1931 Scrapped 1960
325 Yorktown 277' Bay Passenger Steamer Cheasapeake Steamship Co. New 17 May 1928 Torpedoed 26 Sept 1942
326 Virginia California Class 601' Passenger Liner International Mercantile Marine New 26 Nov 1928 Scrapped 1964
327 W.J. Harahan 109' Harbor Tug Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 26 Apr 1928 Extant ( Margaret M. McAllister )
328 Viking 272' Yacht George F. Baker, Jr. New 27 Aug 1929 Collision 6 Jan 1944
329 Pennsylvania California Class 601' Passenger Liner International Mercantile Marine New 10 Oct 1929 Scrapped 1964
330 President Johnson 616' Passenger/Freight Liner Dollar Line Refit 19 Jan 1929 Scrapped 1952
331 City of Elwood 412' Freighter US Shipping Board Refit & Re-engine 12 June 1929 Scrapped 1946
332 Ward 412' Freighter US Shipping Board Refit & Re-engine 1 Aug 1929 Scrapped 1949
333 President Harrison 523' Passenger/Freight Liner Dollar Line Refit 29 Apr 1929 Torpedoed 12 Sept 1944
334 President Garfield 523' Passenger/Freight Liner Dollar Line Refit 13 July 1929 Scrapped 1948
335 C&O Ry. No. 3 Freight Barge Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1929 Unknown
336 C&O Ry. No. 4 Freight Barge Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 1929 Unknown
337 Morro Castle 508' Passenger Liner Ward Line New 15 Aug 1930 Burned 8 Sept 1934 Scrapped
338 Oriente 508' Passenger Liner Ward Line New 21 Nov 1930 Scrapped 1957
339 President Hoover 654' Passenger Liner Dollar Line New 11 July 1931 Wrecked 10 Dec 1937
340 President Coolidge 654' Passenger Liner Dollar Line New 1 Oct 1931 Mined 25 Oct 1942
341 President Fillmore 616' Passenger/Freight Liner Dollar Line Refit 11 Jan 1930 Scrapped 1947
342 Florida 388' Passenger Steamer Peninsular & Occidental Steamship Co. New 20 May 1931 Scrapped 1969
343 Jacona 396' Freighter New England Public Service Co. Conversion to Generator Ship 7 Nov 1930 Unknown Extant 1970's @ Philippines
344 Talamanca 447' Refrigerated Cargo/Passenger Steamer United Fruit Co. New 12 Dec 1931 Scrapped 1965
345 Segovia 447' Refrigerated Cargo/Passenger Steamer United Fruit Co. New -- Burned Incomplete 20 Dec 1931 Rebuilt Hull 354
346 Chiriqui 447' Refrigerated Cargo/Passenger Steamer United Fruit Co. New 18 Mar 1932 Scrapped 1971
347 Colombia 404' Passenger Steamer Colombian Mail Steamship Co. New 17 Nov 1932 Scrapped 1967
348 Haiti 404' Passenger Steamer Colombian Mail Steamship Co. New 15 Dec 1932 Scrapped 1968
349 -- -- -- New -- Cancelled
350 Saint John 403' Passenger Steamer Eastern Steamship Lines New 22 Apr 1932 Scrapped 1959
351 Acadia 403' Passenger Steamer Eastern Steamship Lines New 7 June 1932 Scrapped 1955
352 -- 402' Freighter Eastern Steamship Lines New -- Cancelled
353 Ranger
(CV 4)
Ranger Class Light Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 4 June 1934 Scrapped 1947
354 Peten 447' Refrigerated Cargo/Passenger Steamer United Fruit Co. Reconstruction & Completion - Hull 345 24 Feb 1933 Scrapped 1969
355 Steel Barge No. 33 Tank Barge Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. New 1932 Unknown
356 Huntington 109' Harbor Tug Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. New 18 Nov 1933 Preserved @ Norfolk
357 Angelina 411' Freighter A.H. Bull & Co. New 25 Apr 1934 Torpedoed 17 Oct 1942
358 Manuela 411' Freighter A.H. Bull & Co. New 20 May 1934 Torpedoed 24 June 1942
359 Yorktown
(CV 5)
Yorktown Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 30 Sept 1937 Torpedoed 7 June 1942
360 Enterprise
(CV 6)
Yorktown Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 12 May 1938 Scrapped 1958
361 Boise
(CL 47)
Brooklyn Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 12 Aug 1938 Scrapped 1983
362 St. Louis
(CL 49)
Brooklyn Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 19 May 1939 Sunk 25 Aug 1980
363 Mustin
(DD 413)
Sims Class Destroyer US Navy New 15 Sept 1939 Target 18 Apr 1948
364 Russell
(DD 414)
Sims Class Destroyer US Navy New 3 Nov 1939 Scrapped 1948
365 George W. Stevens 109' Harbor Tug Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 14 Oct 1937 Extant 1980's
366 F.M. Whitaker 109' Harbor Tug Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. Co. New 29 Oct 1937 In Service ( Gladys B. )
367 Esso Delivery No. 11 260' Powered Tank Barge Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 8 Feb 1938 Scrapped 1953
368 Steel Barge No. 30 Scow Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. New 1937 Unknown
369 America 723' Passenger Liner United States Lines New 2 July 1940 Wrecked 18 Jan 1994
370 Esso Richmond 553' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 20 Apr 1940 Scrapped 1970
371 Esso Raleigh 553' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ New 21 June 1940 Scrapped 1975
372 Salamonie
(AO 26)
553' Tanker Standard Oil Co. of NJ/US Navy New 28 Apr 1941 Scrapped 1970
373 Nightingale 459' C2 Freighter Maritime Administration for W.R. Grace & Co. New 30 Oct 1939 Scrapped 1973
374 Stag Hound 459' C2 Freighter Maritime Administration for W.R. Grace & Co. New 4 Dec 1939 Scrapped 1975
375 Santa Ana 459' C2 Freighter Maritime Administration for W.R. Grace & Co. New 15 Feb 1940 Scrapped 1968
376 Santa Teresa 459' C2 Freighter Maritime Administration for W.R. Grace & Co. New 27 Mar 1940 Scrapped 1969
377 Uruguay California Class 601' Passenger Liner US Maritime Commission Refit 2 Sept 1938 Scrapped 1964
378 Indiana
(BB 58)
South Dakota Class Battleship US Navy New 30 Apr 1942 Scrapped 1964
379 President Jackson 492' C3 Freighter Maritime Administration for American President Lines New 25 Oct 1940 Scrapped 1973
380 President Monroe 492' C3 Freighter Maritime Administration for American President Lines New 19 Dec 1940 Scrapped 1970
381 President Hayes 492' C3 Freighter Maritime Administration for American President Lines New 20 Feb 1941 Scrapped 1975
382 President Garfield 492' C3 Freighter Maritime Administration for American President Lines New 26 Mar 1941 Scrapped 1973
383 President Adams 492' C3 Freighter Maritime Administration for American President Lines New 19 Nov 1941 Scrapped 1973
384 President Van Buren 492' C3 Freighter Maritime Administration for American President Lines New 11 Sept 1941 Scrapped 1975
385 Hornet
(CV 8)
Yorktown Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 20 Oct 1941 Bombed & Torpedoed 26 Oct 1942
386 President Polk 492' C3 Freighter Maritime Administration for American President Lines New 28 June 1941 Scrapped 1970
387 Hawaiian Planter 490' C3 Freighter Matson Navigation Co. New 15 May 1941 Scrapped 1980
388 Hawaiian Packer 490' C3 Freighter Matson Navigation Co. New 16 June 1941 Scrapped 1984
389 Irenee Du Pont 459' C2 Freighter International Freighting Corp. (Du Pont Co.) New 1 Aug 1941 Torpedoed 17 Mar 1943
390 Birmingham
(CL 62)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 29 Jan 1943 Scrapped 1959
391 Mobile
(CL 63)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 24 Mar 1943 Scrapped 1960
392 Essex
(CV 9)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 31 Dec 1942 Scrapped 1975
393 Yorktown
(CV 10)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 15 Apr 1943 Preserved @ Charleston, SC
394 Intrepid
(CV 11)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 16 Aug 1943 Preserved @ New York
395 Hornet
(CV 12)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 29 Nov 1943 Preserved @ Alameda, CA
396 Franklin
(CV 12)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 31 Jan 1944 Scrapped 1966
397 Ticonderoga
(CV 14)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 8 May 1944 Scrapped 1974
398 Randolph
(CV 15)
Essex Class Aircraft Carrier US Navy New 9 Oct 1944 Scrapped 1975
399 Biloxi
(CL 80)
Cleveland Class Light Cruiser US Navy New 31 Aug 1943 Scrapped 1962

Major Sources:
Fox, William A. Always Good Ships: Histories of Newport News Ships . Donning Co., Norfolk, 1986.
Newport News Shipbuilding: The First Century . Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, 1986.
For National Defense . Newport News Shipbuilding & Drydock Co., Newport News, 1941.
Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships . Naval Historical Center, Washington, D.C., 1959-1991.

Special thanks to Phil Tuckey for additional information, and to everyone who has provided updated information about these ships.


A Brief History of Agile: A Mindset for Product Development

It is amazing to think that the Agile approach to developing products has been around in various forms for many years. Some would say the mindset can be found in the Scientific Method that Francis Bacon developed in the 1620’s. Agile has taken root as the defacto mindset to have when building a product with unknown customer needs and a need to discover ways to build it. Agile’s dominance comes after many years of failed products developed using a methodology that worked when the customer needs and knowledge of how to build it are well known. Rarely was this the case for the products being developed.

Below is a timeline of some major events that have helped lead us to the Agile mindset for product development. There are many more contributions, but I believe these are the major events:

  • 1620 – Scientific Method from Francis Bacon
    • Pose a question, gather information, form a hypothesis, test the hypothesis, and share knowledge. Sounds like an Agile mindset.
    • This takes the Scientific Method and adds the “Act” component to enable integration of knowledge to form a cycle.
    • A framework for conserving resources by eliminating waste. People who participate in the system learn to identify expenditures of material, effort and time that do not generate value for customers.
    • Building off PDCA, Deming wanted to bring more attention to the fact that the “Study” phase was about analysis. He felt that “Check” emphasized inspection over analysis.
    • His material was probably the first with a clear flavor of agile, light, and adaptive iteration with quick results. He stated that, “a complex system will be most successful if it is implemented in small steps and if each step has a clear measure of successful achievement as well as a “retreat” possibility to a previous successful step upon failure.“
    • Approach cited in Software Metrics.
    • Formalized and made prominent with a risk-driven iterations concept and the need to use a discrete step of risk assessment in each iteration. Higher risk items were worked on earlier than lower risk items.
    • Presented a holistic approach taken by product developers within a few select companies with six characteristics: built-in instability, self-organizing project teams, overlapping development phases, “multilearning,” subtle control, and organizational transfer of learning.
    • Approach to software development that put less emphasis on planning and more emphasis on an adaptive process. Prototypes are often used in addition to or sometimes even in place of design specifications.
    • “A framework within which you can employ various processes and techniques. Scrum is grounded in empirical process control theory, employs an iterative, incremental approach to optimize predictability and control risk.” – Scrum Guide
    • Emphasized communication, simplicity, testing, and sustainable developer-oriented practices. Advocates frequent “releases” in short development cycles, intended to improve productivity and introduce checkpoints at which new customer requirements can be adopted.
    • 17 developers known as “organizational anarchists” met for 3 days in Snowbird, UT because they were successfully producing software in an iterative and incremental manner as opposed to using a waterfall methodology. They wanted to share their ideas that allowed their methods to work significantly better. They forged the Agile Manifesto with its 4 key values and 12 operating principles that captured the essence of their methods.
    • A lean method to manage and improve work across human systems. This approach aims to manage work by balancing the demands with available capacity and improving the handling of system level bottlenecks.

    As you can see, the application of an Agile mindset for developing products has been around for some time. While there may be passionate debates about the Agile mindset history, its roots extend far beyond Information Technology (IT) and will continue to grow into every function of every industry that wants to improve their innovation process.


    Kanban project management in manufacturing

    The Kanban management system was initially implemented with manufacturing in mind, but it has expanded to other sectors in the 21st century. Agile software developers naturally integrated Kanban to their methodologies, and corporate project managers quickly followed suit. Heavy adoption of data visualization has been a staple of modern enterprise, and this fits perfectly into the Kanban system.

    Before delving into how agile project management can be enhanced by Kanban, it helps to review the principles of this system:

    1. The daily workflow must be visualized in such a way that it displays context. This is the “to-do” aspect.
    2. The work in progress must be balanced for the purpose of making the flow as even as possible. Depending on the project, this may require estimating when teams or individuals will complete tasks or reach milestones. This is the “doing” aspect.
    3. The workflow must be enhanced in a way that allows teams and individuals to work on the next most important task once the current one has been completed. This is the “done” aspect.

    In addition to the above, project managers who choose Kanban as part of their agile methodology should communicate to their team members that improvement is meant to be a continuous goal. In other words, workflows can be upgraded by means of discussion when tasks are completed.


    A brief history of agile methods

    There is a common misconception that agile methods are just for smaller projects. While it’s obvious the falsity of this statement to anyone that actually did it properly, it’s also obvious when we check the origins of agile.

    • 1930s — Walter Shewhart proposes a series of short “plan-do-study-act” (PDSA) cycles.
    • 1950s — The X-15 hypersonic jet applied incremental and iterative development.
    • 1958 — Project Mercury (NASA) software development, ran with half-day iterations.

    “All of us, as far as I can remember, thought waterfalling of a huge project was rather stupid, or at least ignorant of the realities.”
    — Weinberg G. M. (Project Mercury)

    • 1972 — The USS “Trident” Ohio submarine command and control system, developed by IBM FSD. More than 1 million lines of code. Four 6 month iterations.
    • 1972 — Army Site Defence missile tracking software. $100 million project, developed by TRW in 5 iterations.
    • 1970s — Light Airborne Multipurpose System (US Navy). 45 one-month iterations.

    “Every one of those deliveries was on time and under budget”
    — Mills H.

    “Software development should be done incrementally, in stages with continuous user participation and replanning and with design-to-cost programming within each stage.”
    — Mills H. (1976)

    • 1977-1980 — Space Shuttle (NASA) avionic software. 17 iterations over 31 months (8 weeks average).
    • 1980s — Artificial intelligence researchers used Lisp machines and evolutionary prototyping.
    • 1987 — Command and Control Processing and Display System Replacement, developed by TRW in 6 time-boxed iterations.
    • 1980s — The DoD was experiencing a project failure rate of 75% in a sample of waterfall project of about $37 billion overall, where only 2% of them were used without extensive modification. At the end of 1987 the DoD changed its policies to allow iterative development.
    • 1994 — The DoD was still victim of the waterfall mindset, developing too much using waterfall and so Paul Kaminsky issued a report stating: “DoD must manage programs using iterative development”.

    But of course, by the 90s the agile concepts were spreading more and as such more and more project were started using this approach, until in 2001 the agile manifesto was written.

    Here I did just a summary, but the data I presented comes from a 2003 article by Larman and Basili, published by IEEE: “Iterative and Incremental Development: A Brief History” (PDF). It’s well written and with loads of references and details. Thanks to Dave Gray for pointing me to this great source.

    What’s incredibly interesting is that the author of what’s considered the first formalization of waterfall, Winston Royce, agrees instead with incremental and iterative development. Even in its very first article in 1970, “Managing the Development of Large Software Systems” (PDF), he states:

    STEP 3: DO IT TWICE
    If the computer program in question is being developed for the first time, arrange matters so that the version finally delivered to the customer for operational deployment is actually the second version insofar as critical design/operations areas are concerned.

    Waterfall… has never been really waterfall.

    Why then? Well, if you think about it, it’s all about human perception and learning. The waterfall article dedicated entire pages to this “STEP 3: DO IT TWICE” but unfortunately it wasn’t part of the core message in the “waterfall” idea, and as such dropped out in the popular understanding of it.

    It’s a matter of perception, learning and communication.

    That’s also why I started talking about the Dot Loop: to have a simple and effective way to communicate the approach I value most and show how it applies universally.


    The AgileSphere

    The timeline above contains some key moments in the history of agile, and some other interesting events taking place at that same time for reference.

    • 1970 – Waterfall Model was created (by Winston W Royce.) Interestingly enough some of the risks he called out have been realized and are much of the reason we saw agile come into existence.
      • “I believe in this concept, but the implementation described is risky”.
      • “The required design changes are likely to be so disruptive that the software requirements upon which the design is based and which provides the rationale for everything…. are violated. Either the requirements must be modified, or a substantial change in the design is required. In effect the development process has returned to the origin and one can expect up to a 100-percent overrun in schedule and/or costs.”
      • 1990 – Jeff Sutherland and Ken Schwaber conceived the Scrum process in the early 90’s.
      • 1991 – Also, the release of Nirvana’s Nevermind signified the start of the Grunge era that would dominate the music scene up to the mid-90’s.
      • 1995 – Scrum is codified in 1995 in order to present it at a conference in Austin, Texas (US) and published the paper “SCRUM Software Development Process”.
        • Scrum was first tried and refined at Individual, Inc., Fidelity Investments, and IDX (now GE Medical). These weren’t simply startups with greenfield development efforts.
        • 2001 – In February 2001, Jeff and Ken were amongst 17 software development leaders creating the Manifesto for Agile Software Development. – Their goal was to take all the good things they’ve learned and create a “charter” for others to use. By this time there had been many variations of agility that evolved. The manifesto was taking the best of the best and boiling it down to principles rather than a framework or methodology.
        • 2001 – Also, Lord of the Rings comes out in Theaters

        Key Takeaway: Agile is not a flash in the pan, and is something that has been evolving for 20+ years. I believe we are even starting to see Agile become more of the “norm” in Software development. Agile as a mindset opens up the door for so much more than just SW Development. What do you think will be the key points in time for agile 20 years from now?


        Catalogue description Convoy number HX 244 from Halifax (later New York) to UK. Sailing on 17 6 1943 and.

        You can order records in advance to be ready for you when you visit Kew. You will need a reader's ticket to do this. Or, you can request a quotation for a copy to be sent to you.

        Convoy number HX 244 from Halifax (later New York) to UK. Sailing on 17 6 1943 and arriving on 30 6 1943. Ship names: Salacia, Thomas R Marshall, Empire Capulet, Curacao, Empire Hunter, Fort Fraser, Tudor Prince, Tetela, Tai Shan, Asa Gray, Eugene Field, Fort Erie, Fort Albany, George F Fatten, Medina, Patrick Henry, Richmond Mumford Pearson, Agwidale, Steel Inventor, Dorcasia, Empire Flint, Petter, C M Bernuth, Toltec, Naranio, Buenos Aires, Fernmoor, Spinager, Norholm, Fernwood, Brimanger, Palembang, Edam, Samuel Bakke, Corilla, Ivaran, Meline, Anna Knudsen, Emma Bakke, Baltyk, Reinholt, Gabriel Duval, British Statesman, Ninella, El Aleto, Cliona, Empire Chief, British Chivalry, Port Grouard, San Veronico, British Purpose, British Valour, British Tenacity, Eskbank, Opalia, Voco, Atlantian, Fort Assiniboine, Glenlyon, British Harmony, Empire Herald, San Vulfrano, W R Keever, Steel Traveller, El Oceano, F T Freeling Huysen, Tarleton Brown, Julien Poydras, William Blount, James W Fannin, George Weems, Empire Bunting, Elona, Empire Cavalier, Atenas, Gulfgem, Gulf Wing, Schoharie, Northern Sun, Belgian Gulf, Edwin Markham, William A Graham, F J Luckenbach, Nataniel Bacon, Anthony Wayne, Cefalu, Collis P Huntington, John Langdon, Roger Williams, Charles A McAllister, Hubert Howe Bancroft, Thomas Lynch.


        Introducing a New Era: The Expand of Agile

        In 2001, Agile started its journey, but the legacy of agile had only just begun. After that meeting, the 17 thought-leaders of the agile manifesto started promoting the value of agile to the world. The desire to promote the value of the agile manifesto encouraged them to create an organization. And the Agile Alliance was introduced in the history of agile.

        Agile Alliance- a nonprofit organization that works to spread words about Agile. Its goal is to help teams adopt the Agile methodology by providing resources. Also, the organization work to improve the agile approach to meet changing needs.

        After the birth of agile, throughout the 20s several software development teams contributed to the agile methodology. They introduced us with “role-feature-reason,” “retrospective,” “quick decisions and many more practices.

        In 2003, the Agile Alliance organized its first conference in Utah. It was named Agile 20XX, and its goal was to expand the agile principles and provide a venue for people to flourish their ideas. The Agile Alliance has expanded its presence over the years. Even today, they organize agile events, support affiliate groups, and promote agile ideology in organizations.


        Agwidale

        While still under construction, the single-screw steel-hulled freighter Agwidale was acquired by the Navy from the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, Virginia, near the end of World War I and assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (NOTS). Commissioned at Newport News on 16 November 1918, Lt. Comdr. Maurice E. Huntley, USNRF, in command, Agwidale shifted to the Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) Piers at Norfolk on the 24th, and there took on board a cargo of motor tractors. On 4 December 1918, she sailed for the Virginia capes, and at 1300 that day sighted a disabled seaplane off her port bow.

        Agwidale altered course accordingly, and reached the downed Curtiss HS-2L flying boat soon thereafter, maneuvering to take the plane in tow. She apparently then headed back toward Hampton Roads, with the plane—still occupied by its three-man crew— traveling in tow astern. Eventually, at 1512 the subchaser SC—195 came alongside and relieved the freighter of the towing chores to take the plane back to Hampton Roads.

        Two days later, having returned to an anchorage off the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Agwidale set out for France, and reached La Pallice, en route to Rochefort, on 19 December. After discharging cargo at Rochefort, Agwidale, in ballast, set out for the United States on 29 January 1919. Mooring at Hoboken on the afternoon of 15 February, the cargoman cleared New York Harbor 10 days later, bound for Holland on her second and last voyage under the NOTS aegis.

        Agwidale reached Rotterdam, via the British Isles, on the afternoon of 12 March. She discharged her cargo over the ensuing days, and, on the morning of the 21st, let go all lines and got underway to return to the United States. She returned home without incident and tied up alongside Pier 15, Hoboken, shortly after noon on 4 April. Three days later, she received orders to prepare for decommissioning.

        At noon on 11 April 1919, Agwidale was decommissioned and turned over to representatives of the United States Shipping Board, a civilian crew replacing a token Navy one the following afternoon. Agwidale retained her name for the rest of her days under American registry, which extended through the depression years and World War II. Initially operated by the Clyde Steamship Co., she later worked under the flag of the Clyde-Mallory Line, and, still later, Agwilines, Incorporated, until she was sold to Chinese interests in 1946 and renamed Wei Ming. Her subsequent fate is a mystery. [1]


        The roots of agile project management

        Here's a brief history of agile project management. By brushing up on these fundamental concepts, you'll gain insight into the challenges and problems that agile techniques are designed to resolve.

        My recent agile project management columns focus on practical elements, such as project sizing, planning, and estimating. Now I'll take a step back and look at some of the theory behind the agile project management movement.

        Most IT project managers and software developers are familiar with the Agile Manifesto, the foundation document of the agile movement, but most IT pros are not aware of the philosophical underpinnings of this movement. The ideas that support agile development and project management didn't spontaneously spring out of the minds of the signatories to the Agile Manifesto the ideas are based on a history of academic studies and real-world experience. Knowing these fundamental concepts will add depth and context to any discussion of agile methods.

        Let's start by acknowledging that there are accepted issues with standard project management methods. The famous Standish Group CHAOS Studies demonstrate that many IT projects fail to fulfill schedule and cost forecasts, and often fail to deliver the benefits predicted. These issues have been confirmed by various organizations, including the Department of Defense (DoD). The DoD noted that, of the $35.7 billion spent by the organization in 1995 for software, only 2 percent of the software was usable as delivered. The DoD found that 75 percent of the software developed was either never used or was cancelled prior to delivery.

        Other academic research challenged common IT development and project management methods. In 1998, Harvard Business School academics Robert D. Austin and Richard L. Nolan studied large software projects. Their study, which questioned many of the fundamental ideas of IT development and project management, produced these key findings:

        • "The first flawed assumption is that it is possible to plan such a large project.
        • The second flawed assumption is that it is possible to protect against late changes.
        • The third flawed assumption is that it even makes sense to lock in big projects early."

        Watts Humphrey, a respected IBM researcher, followed this study with a paper outlining his Requirements Uncertainty Principle, which asserts that:

        "for a new software system, the requirements will not be completely known until after the users have used it."

        Hadar Ziv of the University of California followed soon afterwards with his Uncertainty Principle in Software Engineering, which states:

        "Uncertainty is inherent and inevitable in software development processes and products."

        The connection between these ideas and the underlying concepts of agile project management should be clear. If users can't foretell what they'll want until they see it, if predicting and planning substantial IT projects is not possible, and if protecting projects against changes that arise during the development process is impractical, the ideas behind existing "waterfall" methods are clearly flawed, and an incremental, prototype-based methodology could offer substantial benefits.

        The rise of the Internet ushered in a wildly innovative and experimental atmosphere in IT. Alan MacCormack, assistant professor at Harvard Business School, and two of his colleagues surveyed the software development methods of innovative Internet companies. In 2001, MacCormack's influential article Evolutionary Model of Software Development Methods outlined a history of IT development techniques, which include these models:

        • Waterfall: follows a sequential process and maintains a document trail.
        • Rapid prototyping: creates a disposable prototype which is exposed to the sponsor to establish customer preferences.
        • Spiral: delivers a series of prototypes that incrementally incorporate user requirements.
        • Incremental or staged delivery: delivers a system to customer in chunks of functional programs that are integrated incrementally to create a complete system.
        • Evolutionary delivery: offers an iterative approach in which customers test an actual version of the software.

        Simply recognizing problems with existing methods does not solve them. In MacCormack's article about Internet companies, he recommended a set of practices that he believed could begin to replace the traditional methods. These simple precepts (which will be familiar to anyone who has researched agile project management ideas) have been cited as launching the movement towards agile techniques:

        • Early release of evolving design and code,
        • Daily build of code and fast turnaround on changes,
        • Deeply skilled teams.

        The Agile Manifesto was the culmination of these new theories and approaches. Written in 2001 by a group of advocates of iterative and incremental development methods, this simple statement is the foundation document of the agile movement, and sets forth the underlying philosophical concepts of agile project management. The signatories include many of the founding fathers of some well-known agile methodologies. Signer Kent Beck went on to develop Extreme Programming Alistair Cockburn became the developer of Crystal Methods and author of influential works on agile development and Jim Highsmith has translated agile software concepts into an Agile Project Management methodology.

        Understanding the academic and experiential background of agile methods better positions us to have a persuasive conversation with our sponsors and clients, and enriches our insight into the challenges and problems that agile techniques are designed to resolve. Agile methods are not simply "sanctioned hacking" as they are sometimes caricatured, but are based on solid research, demonstrating that these incremental, iterative, prototype-based methods solve problems and offer real benefits.

        Get weekly PM tips in your inbox TechRepublic's IT Project Management newsletter, delivered on Wednesday, offers tips to help keep project managers and their teams on track. Automatically sign up today!


        Watch the video: History of the USS Constitution by Micro-Mark (October 2022).

Video, Sitemap-Video, Sitemap-Videos