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HMS New Zealand

HMS New Zealand


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HMS New Zealand

HMS New Zealand was an Indefatigable class battlecruiser that had been paid for by the dominion of New Zealand, but then presented to the Royal Navy on completion. At the start of the First World War she formed part of the Grand Fleet at Scapa, but in mid-August she was moved to the Humber, to form a new squadron with the Invincible. The idea was that they would be able to intervene more quickly against any German raids in the southern North Sea than the squadrons at Scapa or Rosyth.

This Humber squadron had a short lifespan. The New Zealand and the Invincible both took part in the battle of Heligoland Bight, but so did Beatty’s battlecruisers from further north. Soon after the battle the limited advantages of the southern harbour were removed when the Germans laid a minefield off the east coast. The Humber and the Tyne were both abandoned as fleet anchorages while the extent of the minefield was checked, and the New Zealand and Invincible rejoined the Grand Fleet. The New Zealand formed part of Admiral Beatty’s Battlecruiser Fleet, based at Rosyth.

In that capacity she took part in the battle of Dogger Bank. Her first target was the German armoured cruiser Blücher, which came under attack from a number of British battlecruisers, making it hard to judge the effectiveness of the New Zealand’s gunnery, although she fired 147 12in shells during the battle.

On 22 April 1916 the New Zealand was involved in a collision with the Australia during a Grand Fleet sortie. She was repaired in time to serve with the 2nd Battle Cruiser Squadron at the battle of Jutland, where she was the flagship of Rear-Admiral Pakenham. During the first battle cruiser phase of the battle, both the Tiger and the New Zealand attacked the Moltke. The New Zealand fired 420 12in shots, scoring four hits. In return she received one hit from a German heavy shell, but was undamaged. On 3 June she was one of three battlecruiser reported to be ready to go to sea.

The New Zealand spent the rest of the war with the 2nd Battle Cruiser Squadron. She was present at the action of Heligoland Bight of 17 November 1917, reinforcing the 1st Battle Cruiser Squadron. She was sold for break up in December 1922 under the terms of the Washington Treaty.

Displacement (loaded)

22,110t

Top Speed

25kts

Range

6,330 nautical miles at 10kts

Armour – deck

2.5i-1in

- belt

6in-4in

- bulkheads

4in

- barbettes

7in-3in

- turret faces

7in

- conning tower

10in

Length

590ft

Armaments

Eight 12in Mk X guns
Sixteen 4in Mk VIII guns
Four 3pdr guns
Three 18in torpedo tubes

Crew complement

800

Launched

1 July 1911

Completed

November 1912

Captains

Captain L. Halsey
Captain Green

Sold for break up

1922

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


HMS New Zealand

The name of this ship was mentioned in a list of ships that were launched from Earth, with destinations in or near to the Ficus sector, between the years 2123 and 2190. This list was displayed on Jean-Luc Picard's desk monitor in his ready room aboard the USS Enterprise-D. A legible version of the okudagram first appeared in the reference book, Star Trek: The Next Generation - The Continuing Mission. The list became legible to viewers with the remastered episode. For the remastered version of the graphic, the destination of the mission was altered from Alderaan to Aldebaran.

It was one of two ships with the HMS prefix on the list, the other being the HMS Lord Nelson. It was named after several British capital ships called HMS New Zealand, themselves named after the islands of New Zealand.


HMS New Zealand - History

Royal Navy Log Books of the World War 1 Era

HMS NEW ZEALAND &ndash February 1919 to January 1920, UK to Australia, New Zealand, Pacific and Caribbean as part of World Tour by Admiral Jellicoe

Edited by Mike Hemmington, ex-Merchant Navy engineer, Royal Navy enthusiast, New Zealand

New Zealand (Photo Ships, click images to enlarge)

Pendant Nos 08 (1914), 90 (1.18), 53 (4.18). Launched 1.7.11 by Fairfield. 18,800 tons, 590(oa), 555(pp)x80x26ft. Turbine 43000shp, 25.5kts. Armament: 8-12in, 16-4in, 3-21in tt. Armour: 6in sides, 2in deck, 7in guns. Crew: 800. 1st Battle Cruiser Squadron (BCS) Grand Fleet 1914-15, 2nd BCS 1915-18. Battle Honours (and links to despatches, casualties, awards) Heligoland 28 Aug 1914, Dogger Bank 25 Jan 1915, Jutland 31 May 1916. Sold 19.12.22 Rosyth S. Bkg. Co. (British Warships 1914-1919)

Built by Fairfield, laid down 20/6/10, launched 1/7/11, comp 11/12, sold for BU 19/12/22. Completed in February 1912 and presented to the Royal Navy. In February 1913 she left on a world cruise of the Dominions, and on her return in December 1913 joined the 1st BCS for a cruise to the Baltic. Joined the Grand Fleet in August 1914 and served as flagship 2nd BCS in January-February 1915. At the Battle of the Dogger Bank she fired 147-12in shells, without any known result. She became Beatty's temporary flagship when the Lion was put out of action during the battle. In collision with the Australia on 22 April 1916 but repaired in time for Battle of Jutland. Hit by an 11in shell on X turret but without serious damage or casualties: she fired more shells than any other dreadnought (420-12in) but scored only four hits. She joined the 1st BCS in June 1916 but was replaced by Renown in September 1916 and reverted to 2nd BCS for remainder of the war. In 1919 she carried Admiral Jellicoe on his tour of the Dominions, but was one of the ships listed for disposal under the Washington Treaty and was sold in December 1922. (Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1906-21)

British Isles Bases - Selected Charts

British Naval Bases Worldwide - Selected Charts

1. Latitude/longitude, including for days in port, show representative decimal positions for each day, as calculated by the Old Weather project's analysis program. As such, they differ by varying amounts from the positions recorded, usually at noon, in the log pages. In addition, some latitudes/longitudes have been amended in edited logs for errors in the logs, for errors in identifying locations by the analysis program, or simply for greater accuracy. In all cases, refer to the log-page scans for the positions as originally recorded. Not all log pages contain this information and the ships' positions have therefore often been estimated.

2. Full account of any day is available by clicking on the link above that day. Groups of links refer to log book covers and introductory information some may be blank.

THE VOYAGES OF HMS NEW ZEALAND 1919-1920
(More detailed plots follow in the text)

(Maps prepared using Journey Plotter, developed by Maikel. The Plots can only be approximate. They are made by joining-up positions on successive days, and sometimes positions are not given. There will therefore be occasions when the ship appears to have travelled overland)

LOGS FOR FEBRUARY 1919

[Devonport, Portsmouth and Gibraltar]

Cover of logbook for the period 11 th February 1919 to 27 th January 1920.

Above five pages blank.

Title page, vessel details not entered. Captain OE Leggett, CB, RN and Cdr HRG Moore, RN are named.

Printed page of instructions for logkeepers.

Specification page, incomplete except for:

Armament:8 x 12&rdquo guns in 4 turrets. Two submerged 18&rdquo torpedo tubes.

Boats: One steam barge. Two 52&rsquo picket boats. One launch, one pinnace, cutters, whalers, a galley and a skiff.

9.00am: Captain OE Leggett RN commissioned ship.

9.30am: Hands employed drawing stores and as requisite.

11.00am: Read fire stations.

1.30pm: Hands employed drawing stores and as requisite.

4.00pm: Leave to port watch and 1 st part starboard watch from 4.00pm till 7.30am.

5.15pm: 2 nd part starboard watch exercised fire stations

6.00am: Hands employed cleaning ship.

8.30am: Hands employed as requisite.

4.00pm: Leave to starboard watch from 4.00pm till 7.30am.

4.30pm: Watch employed getting in stores.

6.00pm: Leave to 1 st part port watch.

8.30am: Hands employed drawing stores, rigging main derrick and guys and as requisite.

6.00pm: Leave to port watch till 7.30am and 2 nd part of starboard watch.

Hands provisioning ship, carrying out basin trials with main engines and taking on 600 tons of oil fuel.

Hands drawing stores, testing main derrick and provisioning ship.

Hands stowing stores and ammunitioning ship.

Record of compass observations.

Description and positions of correctors.

Devonport and Plymouth Sound and at sea

Page partially obscured.

7.00am: Proceeded into stream as requisite down Hamoaze to Plymouth Sound.

8.45am: Secured to No 2 buoy.

10.30am: Swung ship for adjustment of compasses.

9.00pm: Slipped and proceeded as requisite through main channel.

9.45pm: Draystone Light abeam, course SSW 8 knots.

9.45pm: Dropped pilot, 18 knots.

11.30pm: Start Point Light abeam 6 miles, course S86ºE.

5.20am: Reduced 190 revolutions.

7.00am: Dunmore Point abeam.

7.30am: Proceeded for Spithead and up harbour.

9.30am: Secured alongside South railway jetty, Portsmouth harbour.

Hands employed as requisite and drawing stores.

THE VOYAGES OF HMS NEW ZEALAND
Voyage UK to India

Portsmouth and at sea for Gibraltar

11.00am: Cheered HMS Queen Elizabeth on her arrival from the Grand Fleet.

1.00pm: Proceeded as requisite from South railway jetty for leaving harbour via Spithead and Eastern Channel.

4.00pm: Nab Light [at that time a Light ship] abeam.

5.00pm: Ventnor Pier abeam 1 mile. Course 243º, 17 knots.

10.20pm: Altered course to starboard to avoid steamer.

11.18pm: Altered course to port to avoid steamer.

3.49am: Reduced speed to 15 knots [winds WSW f6 and very rough seas].

5.10am: Reduced speed to 13 knots.

8.35am: Reduced to slow speed and hove to, to secure cables.

9.15am: Course 242º at 13 knots.

1.30pm: Increased speed to 17 knots.

4.00pm: Increased to 200 revolutions.

9.45am: Passed HMS Cockatrice, homeward bound.

12.10pm: Increased to 19 knots.

10.00pm: Same abeam 13.5 miles.

12.10am: Cape Roca abeam 10 miles.

11.15am: Reduced to 205 revolutions.

2.30pm: Reduced to 15 knots.

3.30pm: Lit fires in steam barge and picket boat.

4.00pm: Reduced to 150 revolutions

4.15pm: Proceeded as requisite for Gibraltar, passed through South Entrance and secured alongside South Mole.

6.30pm: His Excellency the Governor [General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien] called on the Admiral.

7.00pm: Received 390 tons oil fuel.

9.30pm: Drew fires in barge.

11.59pm: 2 nd picket boat drew fires.

12.30pm: Discharged 3 ratings to hospital.

1.00pm: Hands employed spreading awnings and embarking stores

4.30pm: Hoisted in boats and prepared for sea.

6.00pm: Proceeded as requisite out of harbour stern first.

6.55pm: Europa Point abeam, course 082º, 15 knots.

7.25pm: Estepona Light bearing N8ºE.

12.35am: Cape Sacratif abeam.

8.07am: Cabo de Gata Light bearing N30ºE.

9.35pm: Cape Bengut sighted on starboard bow.

11.40am: Streamed patent log.

5.47pm: Reduced to 8 knots. Out PVs.

6.03pm: Reverted to 15 knots.

10.00pm: Sighted Maritano Light [probably the Light on Isola Marettimo] bearing N87ºE.

2.00am: Put clocks forward ½ hour.

7.53am: Gozo Point bearing S72ºE.

11.00am: Valetta abeam 1.5 miles. Course 105º.

5.31pm: Reduced to 8 knots. In paravanes, stopped.

Page signed by Captain Leggett.

[Port Said, Suez, Bombay and Karachi]

2.00am: Put on all clocks 30 minutes.

10.50am: Tested 3 pounder saluting guns. Tested pom-poms on P and Q turrets.

12.22pm: Reduced to 160 revolutions.

2.00am: Put on clocks 30 minutes*.

9.15am: Held divine service.

10.25am: Passed HMS&rsquo Hilarion [possibly a tug] and M.31.

5.00pm: Reduced to 8 knots. Got out paravanes.

5.27pm: Increased to 12 knots, then 15 knots.

* Ship time is adjusted as the ship sails East and this is done in two increments of 30 minutes at 2.00am, rather than one of an hour, so that each watch benefits from shortening the middle watch.

3.09am: Altered course 195º avoid steamer.

4.25am: Reduced to 10 knots Course 181º. Got in paravanes

6.00am: Proceed as requisite up channel to Port Said and secured head and stern to buoys. Commenced receiving 2,000 tons of coal [New Zealand burns both coal and oil].

Lat 30.58, Long 32.29 [approx]

6.35am: Slipped from buoys, weighed port anchor and proceed as requisite through Suez Canal.

8.30am: Hands employed as requisite and cheering* ship on passing Kantara Camp.

1.00pm: Stopped in Lake Timsah off Ismailia and changed pilots

1.30pm: Proceeded as requisite. Encountered heavy sandstorm and squalls.

3.30pm: Stopped and anchored in Great Bitter Lake.

* All hands line the rail and give three cheers, a particular mark of respect. At this time there were still a large number of NZ troops in the camp.

5.25am: Fire reported in Marine mess deck. Hands to fire stations. Fire extinguished.

7.40am: Weighed and proceed as requisite through Canal.

11.40am: Anchored in Suez Bay.

1.00pm: Received oil fuel. Hoisted out 1 st picket boat and barge.

8.20pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite through dredged channel.

9.02pm: Course 196º, 15 knots.

9.18pm: Course 180º, 15 knots.

10.40pm: Streamed Trident log.

11.58pm: Zafarana Light abeam, 4 miles.

3.00am: Put clocks on ½ hour.

3.42am: Ras Gharib Light abeam, 3.5 miles.

8.15am: Shadwan Light abeam, 4.5 miles.

1.26pm: Same abeam, 5.4 miles.

5.50pm: Lost one rotator and log line.

5.58pm: Turned 16 points to port. Lowered seaboat. Stopped ship.

6.25pm: Course 147º, 15 knots.

8.20pm: Same abeam, 3.5 miles. Course 151º.

6.30am: Passed SS Lordor [?] bound to Suez from Singapore.

10.15am: Trident log carried away, lost one rotator and logline.

3.15pm: Course 150º, Jebel Teir abeam, 4.5 miles.

8.30pm: Course S44ºE, sighted Quoin Island ahead.

10.04pm: Quoin Island abeam.

5.00am: Perim High Light bearing EbyN, 4 miles. Course 107º

9.45am: Aden in sight bearing N70ºE.

11.40am: Proceeded as requisite into Aden Bay.

12.15pm: Received mails and letters. Officer of the Guard from HMS Diana repaired onboard.

12.30pm: Proceeded as requisite.

12.40pm: Course 77º, Ras Marshaq abeam, 2 miles.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes

10.00am: Marine guard at drill

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

11.00am: Exercised guard. Saluting guns&rsquo crews fired salute.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

6.35pm: Sounded in 55 fathoms.

2.30am: Sounded in 36 fathoms.

3.00am: Sounded in 27.5 fathoms.

3.15am: Course 127º. Sounded in 19 fathoms.

4.00am: Reduced to 10 knots.

6.00am: Got in paravanes and proceed as requisite up harbour.

9.30am: C-in-C East Indies [Vice-Admiral Ernest Gaunt] called on Admiral Viscount Jellicoe.

4.45pm: Admiral Viscount Jellicoe landed to visit His Excellency the Governor [George Lloyd].

7.00pm: Returned salute of Portuguese Man of War.

7.30pm: HE the Governor of Bombay returned call of Admiral. Fired salute of 19 guns.

11.00am: Lord Jellicoe and staff left for Delhi.

12.30pm: Received 800 tons oil fuel from SS British Emperor.

Hands employed as requisite. Prepare for coaling.

Coaled ship by native labour.

Hands employed cleaning ship and as requisite.

Hands employed painting and as requisite.

Landed one case for hospital.

Hands employed painting and as requisite.

4.15pm: Read warrants No 6 and 7.

Hands employed painting and as requisite.

6.00am: Read warrants Nos 8 and 9.

In pm: 84 European ship visitors.

Hands employed as requisite

25 European ship visitors.

7.00am: Admiral Viscount Jellicoe and staff returned to ship.

10.00am: Landed field guns with Seaman and Marine crews.

In pm: Ship visitors (native), 2,000.

9.15am: P Turret at divisional drill.

10.00am: C-in-C East Indies came on board.

In pm: Ship visitors, 13 European, 30 Native and 200 children.

In pm: Admiral Viscount Jellicoe At Home onboard. 410 guests.

Bombay and at sea for Karachi

7.05pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

8.08pm: Bombay Light abeam, course 307º, 25 knots.

9.53pm: Bombay Outer Light abeam, 2 miles. Course 309º.

7.30am: Land on starboard bow.

9.30am: Hands mustered by the open list.

11.00am: Reduced to 155 revs.

3.52pm: Dwarka Temple abeam, 11.3 miles.

12.01am: Sounded in 20 fathoms.

12.45am: Sounded in 59 fathoms.

5.30am: Course 033º, 12 knots.

6.45am: Came to port anchor, 6 shackles in 6 fathoms*.

10.00am: High Commissioner of Sind and GOC Karachi called on Admiral.

4.15pm: Landed 20 officers and 200 men.

* A shackle of chain measured 12.5 fathoms, ie 75&rsquo or 22.86 metres. Note that New Zealand only has 6 feet of water beneath her keel.

10.30am: Funeral party at drill.

3.45pm: Landed funeral party [for AB Andrew Rennie, J13182, late of this ship, died after an accident].

8.27pm: Weighed and proceed South, 15 knots.

10.00am: Dwarka Light bearing N57ºE, 6.5 miles.

2.35am: Sounded in 19 fathoms

3.50am: Prongs Light bearing S25ºE. Reduced to 12 knots

4.30am: Kundari Light bearing S35ºE.

5.35am: Course and speeds as requisite for entering harbour.

6.45am: Came to starboard anchor, 6 shackles in 6 fathoms.

9.15am: Small arms companies at manual drill. Remainder of hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 6.50am.

2.00pm: Discharged one rating to hospital.

9.15am: Small arms companies at manual drill.

12.15pm: Discharged Midshipman VCB Fawcus RN to Colaba War hospital.

10.15pm: Midshipman Fawcus died in hospital.

9.15am: Held divine service

3.00pm: Landed funeral party for burial of Midshipman Fawcus RN in Sewri cemetery.

In am: Hands employed as requisite.

In pm: Training classes at instruction.

8.15pm: Discharged to HMS Topaze for passage to England, one Officer Steward 3rd class and one Chief Yeoman of Signals.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

5.30pm: Dance given by the ship&rsquos company, 400 guests.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

4.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 6.50am.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Landed 250 men and 8 officers for entertainment at Willingdon Club.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

All leave stopped owing to native riots ashore.

Hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 11.00pm

9.15am: Held divine service.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 6.50am.

Training classes at instruction.

9.30am: Ordinary Seamen and Boys mustered bags.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

12.30pm: Discharged one rating to hospital.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

Hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am.

Hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

1.45pm: Discharged one Stoker to hospital.

9.15am: Held divine service.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am in the fort.

7.00pm: 50 ship visitors (YMCA workers).

Hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am and to Boys till 7.30pm.

In am: Landed usual church parties and held divine service.

In pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am and to Boys till 7.30pm.

1.30pm: Discharged one rating to hospital.

5.00pm: His Highness the Gaekwar of Baroda and suite visited ship.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

Seamanship and gunnery training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am

In pm: 100 school children visited ship.

7.00am: Read warrants Nos 9 and 10.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

1.45pm: Discharged one rating to hospital.

In pm: 320 ship visitors. Provisioned ship.

Hands employed provisioning ship and as requisite.

4.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am. 20 ship visitors.

Hands employed as requisite.

Training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am

In pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am and to Boys till 7.30pm.

1.30pm: Discharged one rating to hospital.

4.15pm: Read warrant No 11. 30 ship visitors.

In am: Landed usual church parties and held divine service.

In pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am and Boys till 7.30pm. 50 ship visitors.

Hands employed as requisite and getting in provisions. Training classes at instruction.

In pm: One rating joined ship. 108 ship visitors.

9.00am: Four ratings rejoined from hospital.

9.15am: Training classes at instruction, remainder employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

1.45pm: Discharged one rating to hospital.

6.30pm: 10 Lascar Signal Boys joined ship.

Bombay and at sea for Colombo

In am: Hands preparing ship for sea and as requisite.

12.30pm: Admiral of the Fleet Lord Jellicoe and staff rejoined ship.

1.00pm: Discharged Midshipman JP Gornall RN to hospital.

3.30pm: Vice Admiral and Mrs Gaunt and staff came on board for passage to Colombo.

6.50pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

8.00pm: Bombay LV abeam. Course 253º, 15 knots.

9.15pm: Kundari Light bearing S78ºE .

THE VOYAGES OF HMS NEW ZEALAND
Operations in Australasia

[Colombo, Albany, Port Lincoln, Adelaide and Melbourne]

9.10am: Vengurla Rocks [Burnt Island] abeam 10 miles.

9.15am: Read warrant No 3 of HMS Dalhousie.

9.30am: Training classes at instruction.

2.00pm: Paid monthly payment.

5.18pm: Pigeon Island [Netrani Island] abeam

8.02pm: Caph Light bearing S66ºE.

2.55am: Kamanar Light bearing N84ºE.

6.30am: Dolphin Head bearing N83ºE.

7.08pm: Muttom Light bearing S80E.

8.30pm: Muttom Light abeam 8.0 miles.

7.00am: Colombo Light bearing S60ºE, 18 miles. Courses and speeds as requisite for entering harbour.

8.20am: Secured to buoys head and stern heading North, let go port anchor, 3 shackles. Commenced coaling ship.

In port: HIJMS Nisshin with four destroyers and three submarines.

4.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

10.00am: Captain of HIJMS Nisshin called.

Sick list: 22. [Some suffering from the &ldquoSpanish flu&rdquo as it was known].

11.15am Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

11.45am: Course 188º, 15 knots.

3.36pm: Edwards Pillar bearing S86ºE.

Course 137º at 15 knots all day.

11.45pm: Crossed Equator in Long 85º 47&rsquoE.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30mins.

2.40pm: Reduced to 10 knots for appendix operation to be carried out.

4.30pm: Increased to 175 revolutions

7.00pm: Read warrants Nos 12 and 13.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes

6.00am: Entered SE trade wind in Lat 5º 40&rsquoS

8.15am: Stopped port engine owing to condenser leaking. Proceeded at 220 revolutions with starboard engine.

5.00pm: Started port engine, 175 revolutions.

9.30am: Exercised action stations.

3.30pm: Course 148º and as requisite for examining N Keeling Island and closing Cocos Islands.

3.40pm: N. Keeling Island abeam.

4.43pm: Stopped off Direction Island bearing SSE, 5 miles.

6.00pm: 12 visitors came onboard from Telegraph Station.

6.35pm: Proceeded as requisite, course E.

6.40pm: Course 144º, 165 revs, Direction Island bearing East, 5 miles.

Course 144º, 14.5 knots all day.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes

11.45am: Furled awnings [winds SE&rsquoly f5 with showers].

7.50am: Vice Admiral Nakano saluted Viscount Jellicoe, 19 guns and manned ship.

8.00am: Salute returned, cheered ship in 18º 49&rsquoS, 101º 49&rsquoE.

8.45am: Altered course to SE while spreading quarterdeck awning.

10.45am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick [Thomas Crick] officiating.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

9.30am: Exercised 12" control parties and saluting guns&rsquo crews.

9.50am: Reduced to 8 knots. Exercised manning ship.

10.35am: Increased to 165 revs.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

9.15am: Exercised small arms companies and fired 3 rounds shrapnel from 4" high angle gun.

8.16pm: Same abeam 12 miles.

6.30am: Course 025º. Land ahead.

7.30am: Eclipse Island abeam. Courses and speeds as requisite for entering King George Sound and Princess Royal harbour.

9.10am: Anchored in 5.5 fathoms.

1.00pm: Admiral of the Fleet landed for civic reception.

4.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

8.15pm: Lord and Lady Jellicoe and staff proceeded to Perth by train.

9.15am: Exercised manning ship. Training classes to instruction. Remainder employed as requisite.

4.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am.

5.00pm: 400 school children visited ship.

4.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

8.15am: SS Lamako [?] came alongside.

9.00am: Landed RC church parties.

10.00am: Hands rigging collier and preparing for coaling.

12.30pm: Leave to port watch till 9.00pm.

774 visitors visited ship

Draught before coaling for&rsquod 26&rsquo 10", aft 28&rsquo 4".

5.35pm: Finished coaling. Received 1,587 tons.

7.00pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

Draught after coaling for&rsquod 28&rsquo 10", aft 29&rsquo 2".

Hands cleaning ship and as requisite.

4.15pm: Read warrants 14 to 17 inclusive.

9.30am: Landed small arms companies.

12.30pm: Admiral and staff returned from Perth. Rear Admiral Creswell and Captain Hyde RAN, came on board for passage.

2.30pm: Unmoored, weighed starboard anchor.

4.00pm: Weighed port anchor and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

5.00pm: Breaksea Light abeam 1 mile, course 092º, 15 knots.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

5.20pm: Reduced to 160 revolutions.

6.00pm: Read warrants Nos 18 to 21 inclusive.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

9.15am: Exercised general quarters.

10.30am: Passed SS Warwickshire [recorded in the hyperlink as returning troops to Australia on this trip].

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

6.35am: Sighted Neptune Island Light bearing S82ºE.

9.00am: Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching and entering Port Lincoln harbour.

11.40am: Anchored off Port Lincoln township.

1.30pm: Admiral of the Fleet and staff landed at Port Lincoln.

5.10pm: Weighed and proceeded to sea.

7.10pm: Course 127º 13 knots, Dangerous Rock Light abeam.

6.30am: Courses and speeds as requisite for entering Adelaide outer harbour.

8.30am: Secured alongside wharf.

1.00pm: Lord and Lady Jellicoe and staff proceeded to Government House.

4.30pm: Leave to starboard watch and 2 nd part of port watch till 7.00am.

8.00am: Dressed ship in honour of Her Majesty the Queen&rsquos birthday.

10.00am: Landed 250 men for march through streets of Adelaide.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch and 2nd part of starboard watch till 6.30am. Leave to Boys till 5.30pm.

10.00am: Landed 300 men recreation party.

1.15pm: Sir Henry Galway, Governor of South Australia called on the Admiral of the Fleet.

2.00pm: Fired 17 gun salute on the departure of the Governor.

4.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 10.00pm.

11.00pm: Admiral of the Fleet and staff returned on board.

Adelaide and at sea for Melbourne

4.00am: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

5.00am: Course 203º, 16 knots.

11.15pm: Course 106º, Reduced to 140 revolutions.

11.59pm: Cape Nelson Light abeam 11 miles.

8.00am: Course 058º, reduced to 130 revolutions.

1.40pm: Increased to 155 revolutions, proceeded as requisite to Port Phillip Head and South Channel.

2.00pm: Stopped off Quarantine Station

2.20pm: Proceeded as requisite, 14 knots.

3.08pm: Course 358º. 14 knots.

5.00pm: Proceed as requisite for anchorage.

5.15pm: Came to port anchor in 6 fathoms off Williamstown. Anchor bearings 6.5 cables S32ºE from Gillibrand Light.

10.00am: Admiral of the Fleet and staff landed at St. Kilda for public reception.

1.00pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite and secured alongside Western side of New Pier.

2.30pm: His Excellency the Governor General [Sir Ronald Ferguson] called on Admiral of the Fleet.

3.30pm: Saluted His Excellency, 19 guns.

4.00pm: The Army Council and the Lord Mayor called on Admiral of the Fleet

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am Monday and to 1st part port watch till 11.00pm and to Boys till 7.00pm.

[Melbourne, Hobart, Jervis Bay and Sydney]

10.00am: Held divine service. His Excellency the Governor General attended.

In pm: Ship was open to public. 25,000 ship visitors.

8.30am: HMAS Yarra proceeded alongside with oil.

3.00pm: Yarra proceeded and returned at 6.30pm with more oil.

8.00am: Dressed ship in honour of His Majesty the King&rsquos birthday.

12.30pm: Received 585 tons oil fuel from HMAS Yarra

Hands employed as requisite. Training classes at instruction.

In am: Divers down examining underwater fittings.

In am: Divers down examining underwater fittings.

In pm: Mr Watt [William Watt, acting Prime Minister] and six ministers visited ship. 300 to 400 ship visitors.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am Monday. Leave to 1st part starboard watch till 11.00pm and Boys till 7.00pm.

Hands employed as requisite.

10.10am: Returned salute of 11 guns from HMAS Australia which secured alongside New Pier.

4.15pm: Read warrants Nos 24 - 31 inclusive.

Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

Hands preparing ship for coaling and as requisite.

Draught before coaling for&rsquod 28&rsquo 0", aft 28&rsquo 6".

In am: Hands coaling ship, received 670 tons. Lost overboard by accident two shovels and 36 2 cwt coal bags.

2.00pm: HMAS Australia left for Sydney.

Melbourne and at sea for Hobart

11.00am: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

11.30am: Course 117º, 13 knots

1.30pm: Course as requisite for passing through South Channel.

2.45pm: Passed Port Phillip Heads.

3.00pm: Course 151º, 11 knots.

4.22pm: Cape Schanck abeam 4.5 miles, course 133º.

6.30am: Goose Island Light bearing N56ºE.

3.03am: Tasman Island Light abeam, 13.5 miles.

4.50am: Tasman Island Light abeam 7.5 miles.

6.35am: Iron Pot Light bearing N49ºW.

8.15am: Course and speeds as requisite for proceeding up Derwent River and entering Hobart.

9.30am: Came to port anchor, 6 shackles in 14 fathoms.

8.15am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite, 12 knots for Derwent River through Northwest Bay and D&rsquoEntrecasteaux Channel.

10.30am: Stopped and landed Hobart Harbour Master at quarantine station at Barnes Bay.

12.50pm: Course S79ºE. Cape Bruny Light bearing 033º, 3.2 miles.

8.08pm: Cape Forestier Light abeam.

8.56pm: Cape Gabo Light bearing N62ºW.

11.08pm: Green Cape Island abeam 12 miles.

8.37am: Course 030º. Perpendicular Point Light ahead.

10.00am: Course and speed as requisite for entering Jervis Bay.

10.40am: Came to starboard anchor in 9 fathoms, 6 shackles.

2.30pm: Landed recreational parties.

Hands employed painting ship and as requisite.

In pm: Landed football parties.

Aired night clothing*. Hands employed painting ship and as requisite.

In pm: Landed football parties.

*Old sweaters and trousers worn by off duty men in the evening.

10.00am: Held divine service, Reverend Crick officiating.

1.30pm: Leave to CPOs and POs till 5.00pm.

11.50pm: Shortened in to 3 shackles on port anchor.

Jervis Bay to Port Jackson

12.04am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving Jervis Bay.

12.45am: Course 055º, 12 knots, Perpendicular Point abeam, 1 mile.

1.35am: Course 022º, 12 knots.

4.55am: Port Jackson outer S Head Light bearing N15ºW.

8.00am: Passed Sydney Heads, proceeded as requisite up Eastern Channel.

8.45am: Secured to No 1 buoy

9.00am: Dressed ship in honour of HRH The Prince of Wales birthday.

Noon: Fired royal salute 21 guns.

3.00pm: HE the Governor of New South Wales [Sir Walter Davidson] called on the Admiral of the Fleet.

Hands employed as requisite. Training classes at instruction.

4.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

8.30am: Landed dockyard parties.

Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

4.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am.

2.30pm: Landed funeral party for funeral of Lt/Cdr Ross RAN, late of HMS Encounter.

2.30pm: HMAS Brisbane and HMA s/m J5 arrived and saluted Admiral of the Fleet, returned salute (7 guns).

1.30pm: Leave to port watch until 7.00am Monday and Boys of port watch till 6.30pm.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

1.30pm: Leave to Boys of starboard watch till 6.30pm.

8.00am: Dressed ship and fired 101 gun salute on signing of peace terms by Germany.

10.00am: Held Thanksgiving Service. Their Excellencies the Governor General and Lady Munro-Ferguson, the State Governor and Lady Davidson attending.

11.00am: Address by HE the Governor General.

Noon: Manned and cheered ship.

5.45pm: Illuminated ship, searchlight display, firework display.

[Sydney and Jervis Bay]

10.00am: Admiral Grant and the Japanese, American and French Consuls called on the Admiral of the Fleet. Saluted them, 11 guns.

4.30pm: Discharged 13 ratings to HMAS Suva.

9.00am: Admiral of the Fleet shifted his flag to HMAS Suva [HMS New Zealand was considered unsuitable for the next leg of the journey see hyperlink for Suva above].

Noon: Saluted C.C.A.F. [possibly Commander in Chief Australian Forces] 11 guns.

1.00pm: Admiral of the Fleet and Staff left ship for Brisbane [by train].

Hands employed as requisite. Training classes at instruction.

Leave to watch till 7.00am.

Turret, magazine and shell room parties at drill.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 10.00pm Sunday

10.00am: Held divine service, Reverend Crick officiating.

In pm: Prepared for coaling, SS Barwon* came alongside.

*The first of two ships with this name owned by Huddart, Parker & Co, 1901, 2,999 grt.

4.30pm: SS Barwon cast off. Prepared ship for sea.

7.30am: Slipped and proceeded to sea, courses Southward for Jervis Bay.

2.45pm: Course and speeds as requisite for entering Jervis Bay.

3.53pm: Came to port anchor, 6 shackles in 9 fathoms.

In am: 4" guns at .303 AR* practice. Carried out 12" sight and director test.

4.15pm: Read warrants Nos 36, 37 and 38.

* AR, Aiming Rifle: a small calibre barrel fitted to guns for aiming practice, saving on expensive full calibre shells and wear and tear on the gun barrel itself.

In am: Stokers aired night clothing. Landed small arms companies, Marines and Stokers. Gunlayers, Sightsetters and trainers of turrets at .303 AR practice.

In pm: Sent 10 tons of coal to RAN College.

In am: Exercised General Quarters. Turret crews at drill. 4" guns at .303 AR practice.

In pm: Landed recreation parties.

8.30am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite in Jervis Bay for 4" GL [Gunlayers] test practice, 2 rounds per gun. Tested P and Q turrets full charge, 2 rounds per gun.

12.30pm: Carried out sub calibre BP [Battle Practice] firing.

10.00am: Held divine service.

Noted: This day reprimanded Mr Lancelot A Wright, Gunner, for absence over leave on night of 6 th /7 th July, signed LA Wright.

In pm: 120 Cadets from RAN College visited ship.

8.30am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite in Jervis Bay for 4" Gunlayers&rsquo test, 6 rounds per gun and also sub calibre practice.

8.30am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite in Jervis Bay for 12" Gunlayers&rsquo test, ¾ charges.

1.52pm: Anchored. Landed recreation parties.

Hands employed painting ship&rsquos side and as requisite.

In am: Training classes to instruction, remainder of hands employed as requisite.

In pm: Landed recreational parties.

12.15am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour and proceeding Northwards for Sydney.

12.45am: Course N55ºE, Perpendicular Point abeam, 1 mile.

7.05am: Passed Heads, proceeded as requisite through East Channel up harbour, 12 knots

7.40am: Secured to Orient buoy, Neutral Bay, Sydney.

11.00am: Field gun crews at drill.

8.00am: Dressed ship in celebration of ratification of Peace.

9.30am: Seamen and Marines landed for march past and Peace procession.

In pm: Held pulling regatta and sports.

8.00pm: Firework display and burned searchlights.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

In pm: Granted usual leave.

Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

8.45am: Slipped and proceeded for leaving harbour.

4.45pm: Passed Perpendicular Point, courses and speeds as requisite for entering Jervis Bay.

5.06pm: Came to starboard anchor, 6 shackles in 10 fathoms.

In am: Landed party to erect wireless transmission mast at Royal Australian Navy College.

In pm: Landed recreation parties.

6.00pm: Exercised night action stations.

In am: Sent 3 tons of coal to RANC.

9.30am: Fired two torpedoes, 5,000 yards run. Turrets at divisional drill

8.30am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite in Jervis Bay. Exercised general quarters. Carried out sub-calibre practice from 12" on battle practice runs. Fired two torpedoes.

4.30pm: Landed recreational parties.

6.00pm: Exercised night action stations.

In am: Hands employed as requisite. Lifebuoys tested (correct).

In pm: Carried out heats of the cutters&rsquo race for Seddon Cup. Landed recreation parties.

Strong SW&rsquoly winds all day, f7 at times with some rain.

Strong SW&rsquoly winds f4-7 with some rain, gradually abating f1-2 by midnight.

Training classes at instruction. Hands employed as requisite.

8.30am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite in Jervis Bay. Carried out sub-calibre 3 pdr BP runs from 12" turrets.

10.40am: Came to port anchor, 5 shackles in 14 fathoms.

5.50pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for night firing practice, full calibre 4" and sub-calibre 12".

6.30am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

7.25am: Course N27ºE. Perpendicular Point abeam, 1.5 miles.

1.25pm: Courses and speeds as requisite for passing Sydney Heads and proceeding up harbour via East Channel. Passed SS Osterley.

2.20pm: Secured to No 1 buoy, Farm Cove.

Hands employed provisioning ship and as requisite.

[Sydney and Wellington]

In am: Hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am Sunday.

Hands employed as requisite.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 6.30am Tuesday.

2.00pm: HMAS Suva arrived. Hoisted Flag of Admiral of the Fleet Viscount Jellicoe.

Training classes at instruction. Hands employed as requisite.

Hands employed as requisite and preparing for ball.

8.30pm: Dance on board given by the Admiral of the Fleet and officers.

11.30am: Fired 11 gun salute at departure of Consul-General.

2.40pm: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for going up harbour and entering dock.

4.00pm: Secured in Sutherland Dock, Cockatoo Island.

Hands employed as requisite, surveying cable etc.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch and part port watch till 6.45am.

11.30am: Read warrants Nos 42 and 43.

4.30pm: Proceeded as requisite out of dock and down harbour.

5.30pm: Secured to No 1 buoy, Farm Cove.

6.00pm: Collier made fast alongside.

Hands coaling ship and as requisite. Received 1,650 tons.

9.15am: Landed party for Thanksgiving service at Sydney Cathedral.

Hands employed as requisite and painting ship. Training classes at instruction.

4.15pm: Read warrants Nos 44 to 48.

Hands employed as requisite.

Hands employed as requisite.

In pm: Admiral of the Fleet held At Home. 800 visitors.

In pm: Midshipmen Grantham, Evans, Firth, Stocker, Campagnac and Browning, all RN, joined ship from HMAS Australia.

Sydney and at sea for Wellington

8.00am: Lieutenant Howden RAN and Lieutenant Hall AIF joined for passage to New Zealand.

10.05am: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour via Eastern Channel.

10.45am: North Head abeam, course 110º, 14.5 knots.

Course 110º, 14.5 knots all day.

8.00am: Reduced to 155 revolutions [13 knots].

6.30pm: Passed SS Wanaka* steering NNE.

*The second of four ships with this name owned by the Union Steamship Co of NZ 1887, 2,422 grt, formerly Liddesdale.

8.30am: Reduced to 145 revolutions.

11.07pm: Sighted Stephens Island Light bearing S51ºE.

1.47am: Stephens Island Light abeam.

3.00am: Reduced to 130 revolutions.

9.00am: Secured alongside jetty.

10.30am: The Governor General of New Zealand [Arthur Foljambe] called on the Admiral of the Fleet. Fired 19 gun salute.

11.00am: GOC Troops called, fired 13 gun salute.

11.30am: Landed 250 men for march through streets.

1.30pm: Granted usual leave.

In pm: 9,841 visitors came on board.

Noon: Landed 500 men for lunch at Town Hall.

Hands employed as requisite. Usual leave. 11,503 ship visitors.

Hands employed as requisite. 16,527 ship visitors.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating, the Governor General and Mr Massey [William Massey, Prime Minister of NZ] attending.

Usual Church parties and leave. 20,142 ship visitors.

In am: "A" turret gun crew, magazine and shellroom parties at drill. Training classes at instruction. 8,620 ship visitors.

Hands employed as requisite and decorating ship.

In pm: Ship&rsquos company held ball on board, 1,200 visitors.

Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

In pm: Admiral of the Fleet and Officers held At Home. 904 visitors.

Hands cleaning ship and as requisite, usual leave, 10,956 visitors.

Wellington and at sea for Lyttelton

10.00am: Held divine service, The Bishop of Wellington [Rt Rev TH Sprott] preached.

4.40pm: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour, 140 revolutions.

5.34pm: Pencarrow Head abeam, course 204º, 145 revolutions.

LOGS FOR SEPTEMBER 1919

[Lyttleton, Picton, Wellington and Auckland]

7.30am: Stopped to embark pilot.

8.00am: Entered Lyttelton harbour.

8.44am: Secured alongside No 6 jetty.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am Wednesday, leave to 2 nd part starboard watch till 10.30pm. Leave to Boys till 6.45pm.

In am: Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Leave to 1 st part starboard watch till 10.30pm.

In am: Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am Friday, to 1 st part port watch till 10.30pm, Boys till 6.45pm.

In am: Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

1.30pm: Leave to 2 nd part port watch till 10.30pm.

10.00am: 200 men left for motor reconnaissance*.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am, 2 nd part starboard watch to 10.30pm.

*Details of this trip and other events laid on for the visit of the ship are included in this contemporary and very interesting newspaper article.

11.30am: Landed 250 men for laying of foundation stone.

In pm: 21,700 ship visitors.

In am: Landed 200 men and officers. The Admiral of the Fleet presented flag to Christchurch Cathedral. Landed usual church parties, granted usual leave. 23,952 visitors.

In am: Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

4.15pm: Read warrants Nos 59 and 60.

In am: Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

In pm: Held At Home. 1,059 ship visitors.

Hands employed as requisite.

In am: Hands employed as requisite, drills and training classes.

In pm: Granted usual leave. 489 visitors.

Hands employed as requisite. 236 visitors.

5.40pm: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

6.55pm: Godley Head abeam 2 miles. Course 038º, 14 knots.

3.35am: Cape Campbell bearing N33ºW.

4.40am: Cape Campbell abeam, 8 miles.

5.15am: Pencarrow Point bearing N32ºW.

6.00am: Brothers Light bearing N20ºW.

6.40am: Reduced to 10 knots.

8.15am: Courses and speeds as requisite for proceeding up Queen Charlotte Sound and anchoring off Mabel Island.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 10.45pm and Boys till 6.45pm. 1,856 visitors.

10.00am: Held divine service, Reverend Crick officiating.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 10.00pm to Boys till 6.30pm. 947 ship visitors.

8.50am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for proceeding down Queen Charlotte Sound and through Cook Strait, 13 knots.

11.00am: Brothers Light abeam, 2 miles, course 172º.

1.00pm: Course as requisite for approaching and entering Port Nicholson.

1.30pm: Pencarrow Head abeam, proceeded into Port Nicholson.

2.10pm: Came to Starboard anchor, 6 shackles in 9 fathoms.

5.00pm: SS Komata made fast alongside port side. Hands prepared for coaling and rigged collier.

Hands coaled ship. Received 2,100 tons.

3.55pm: SS Komata slipped off.

Hands employed as requisite.

Hands employed as requisite.

6.30pm: Searchlight display.

In am: Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

6.30pm: Searchlight display.

Wellington and at sea for Auckland

In am: Hands preparing ship for sea and as requisite.

5.15pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour, 14 knots.

6.15pm: Course 187º, Pencarrow Point abeam.

7.40pm: Course 090º. Cape Palliser bearing N30ºE.

1.00am: Course 036º. Castle Point abeam 4.5 miles.

2.30am: Sighted bonfire at Herbertville, burned 2 searchlights towards bonfire.

6.30am: Reduced to 14 knots.

8.00am: Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching and stopping at Napier harbour.

8.41am: Auckland Rock abeam 3º

9.00am: Course 049º, 14.5 knots.

11.10am: Reduced to 7 knots and stopped off Wairoa River.

11.30am: Course 133º, 15 knots.

3.40pm: Course 343º to approach Poverty Bay.

4.20pm: Stopped 1.5 miles off Gisborne.

4.55pm: Course 130º, 150 revolutions.

6.30pm: Gable End abeam, course 016º.

10.35pm: Same abeam, 6 miles.

9.00am: Reduced to 140 revolutions.

11.25am: Cuvier Light abeam, 2.75 miles.

12.20pm: Reduced to 130 revolutions.

1.40pm: Channel Island abeam, 2 miles.

4.30pm: Courses and speeds as requisite for proceeding through Rangitoto Channel and entering Auckland harbour.

5.40pm: Secured alongside Queens Wharf, port side.

In am: Landed Seaman and Marine platoons for march through streets. 600 ship visitors. The Admiral of the Fleet and officers attended a civic reception at the Town Hall.

In pm: 12,600 ship visitors.

9.00am: Admiral of the Fleet and 20 officers left for Rotorua.

9.30am: Divers down unreeving paravane chains.

Sunday routine. 21,600 visitors.

LOGS FOR OCTOBER 1919

[Auckland, Suva, Levuka, Apia, Christmas Island, Fanning Island and Honolulu]

In am: SS Komata came alongside. Coaled ship, received 1,100 tons.

In pm: Granted usual leave. Hands paid quarterly settlement.

5.30pm: Admiral of the Fleet and officers returned from Rotorua.

Admiral of the Fleet and officers held At Home. 1,600 visitors.

Auckland and at sea towards Suva

2.35pm Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour via Rangitoto Channel.

3.35pm: Rangitoto Light abeam, 1 mile. Course 038º, 14 knots.

5.10pm: Flat Rock abeam, course 355º.

6.12pm: Northern extension of Little Barrier Island abeam.

Course 009º all day at 14 knots.

Course 009º all day at 13.5 knots.

9.45am: Stopped and dropped target, proceeded as requisite for carrying out 4" full calibre firing.

11.20am: Course 009º, 12 knots.

2.00am: Cape Washington Light bearing N69ºE, 6.5 miles.

2.25am: Course 047º, 11 knots.

2.42am: Cape Washington Light bearing S49ºE.

5.45am: Kama Kula Island bearing S65ºE.

5.50am: Solo Light bearing E.

6.30am: Course 349º, 15 knots.

7.30am: Land in sight ahead.

8.12am: Courses and speeds as requisite for entering Suva harbour.

9.00am: Came to port anchor, 6 shackles in 12.5 fathoms.

11.35am: The Governor of Fiji [Sir Cecil Hunter-Rodwell] called on the Admiral of the Fleet.

Noon: Saluted with 17 guns.

6.00pm: Coal stack placed alongside, prepared for coaling.

In am: Coaled ship, received 886 tons.

7.45am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

8.10am: Course 192º, 13 knots.

11.30am: Reduced to 140 revs.

12.25pm: Courses and speeds as requisite for entering Levuka harbour.

12.35pm: Came to port anchor, 5 shackles in 17 fathoms.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

4.20pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

4.30pm: Course 098º, 13 knots.

9.35pm: South Cape, Tairuni Island bearing North.

1.00am: Put clocks back 23 hours 40 minutes [crossing 180º meridian]. Kept American date. Clocks 11 hours 40mins slow on GMT.

2.30am: Course 067º. Wailangilala Light abeam 3.6 miles.

10.00am: A and Q turrets at divisional drill.

3.58pm: Niafou Island bearing S89ºE.

5.15pm: Centre of Niafou Island 4 points on starboard bow.

6.30pm: Niafou Island abeam 14 miles.

At sea to Apia [Samoa]

2.00am: Put clocks on 17 minutes.

11.10am: Reduced to 11 knots.

11.45am: Course as requisite for passing through Apolima Strait.

3.00pm: Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching Apia harbour.

3.20pm: Came to port anchor. Moored ship, 6 shackles each, in 14 fathoms.

5.30pm: Administrator of Samoa [Robert Tate] called on Admiral of the Fleet. Saluted him with 15 guns.

6.30pm: American and Chinese Consuls called on Admiral of the Fleet. Saluted 7 guns.

7.00am: Landed small arms companies for march through town.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 10.45pm, Boys till 7.30pm.

6.10pm: Furled after deck awning.

7.30pm: Burned searchlights.

8.00pm: Landed small patrol.

11.00am: Fired one round ¾ charge from X turret.

5.45pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

6.15pm: Course 015º, 12 knots.

6.20pm: Course 043º, 14 knots.

Course 043º till noon, then 042º, speed 13.5 knots.

Course 042º till 7.30pm, then 048º, speed 13.5 to 14 knots.

2.00am: Put clocks on 15 minutes.

4.15am: Short heavy squalls from ESE.

NE&rsquoly courses all day, 14 knots.

At sea to Christmas Island and at sea

9.30am: Hands mustered by the open list.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

10.40am: Increased to 165 revs.

4.00pm: Proceed as requisite for anchorage off Cook Island.

4.33pm: Came to starboard anchor in 21 fathoms, 6 shackles.

5.00pm: Admiral of the Fleet landed with staff.

6.45pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite.

7.00pm: Course 315º, 140 revs.

5.30am: Land on starboard bow.

6.00am: Fanning Island FS [flagstaff] bearing 045º. Course 087º, 8 knots.

7.00am: Courses and speeds as requisite for lying off English Harbour and proceeding to Whale anchorage.

9.00am: Commodore and Staff landed at English Harbour.

10.00am: Admiral of the Fleet landed at Whale anchorage.

2.15pm: Proceeded as requisite.

2.30pm: Course 005º, 12 knots.

Course 005º, speed 12 knots all day.

Northerly courses, 12 knots.

1.00pm: Reduced to 130 revolutions.

Ord. Seaman Archibald Murray, J82097, presumed to have accidentally fallen overboard and been drowned.

5.45am: Course and speeds as requisite for approaching and entering Honolulu harbour.

6.45am: Fired 21 gun salute to the American flag.

7.00am: Fort saluted Admiral of the Fleet, 19 guns.

7.15am: Secured alongside No 8 wharf.

9.00am: Coal lighters came alongside

10.50am: Admiral Fletcher USN called on Admiral of the Fleet. The Governor [Charles McCarthy] called on Admiral of the Fleet, also French and Japanese Ambassadors.

1.00pm: Commenced coaling with Japanese and native labour

4.00am: Port watch coaled ship

8.00am: Starboard watch coaled ship.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am.

3.45pm: Completed coaling, received 2,001 tons.

6.00pm: Received 799.99 tons oil fuel.

5.30pm: Leave to Stokers of port watch till 7.00am.

10.00am: Landed 300 men for service at cathedral. Remainder of hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Granted leave to starboard watch.

Hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch.

Hands employed as requisite.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 7.00am.

Hands employed as requisite. Usual leave.

In pm: Admiral of the Fleet and Officers held At Home. 1,650 visitors.

2.00pm: Received 118.92 tons oil fuel.

4.45pm: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

5.15pm: Course 145º, 170 revolutions.

6.50pm: Ka-laeo-lea laau Light bearing N57ºE.

THE VOYAGES OF HMS NEW ZEALAND
Operations off North America and West Indies

LOGS FOR NOVEMBER 1919

[Hilo Bay, Esquimalt, Duncan Bay, Vancouver, Esquimalt and San Diego]

At sea to Hilo Bay and at sea

5.30am: Course 150º, 150 revolutions

7.00am: Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching and entering Hilo Bay.

7.40am: Came to starboard anchor, 6 shackles in 7½ fathoms.

10.00am: Admiral of the Fleet, 40 officers and 40 men landed.

4.40pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

5.00pm: Course 040º, 165 revolutions.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30mins

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

9.40am: Dropped both lifebuoys, stopped and lowered both sea boats*.

10.10am: Course 040º, 14.5 knots.

In am: Fired rounds from 1" High Angle gun.

*RN ships at sea have a sea boat&rsquos crew on permanent standby on every watch. This is an exercise of their ability to man and launch at a moment&rsquos notice.

Strong NW&rsquoly winds up to f7, with very rough seas all day.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes.

9.30am: Exercised general quarters.

Strong NW&rsquoly winds 5-6, with a strong NW swell, gradually dying down in the evening.

6.40am: Land on starboard bow.

7.30am: Sounded in 67 fathoms.

9.40am: Course 106º. Cape Flattery Light bearing S16ºE, 5 miles.

1.00pm: Race Rocks Light abeam, 2.9 miles. Courses and speeds as requisite for closing William Head quarantine station.

1.15pm: Stopped off Quarantine Station

2.00pm: Proceeded as requisite for Esquimalt harbour.

2.30pm: Came to starboard anchor in Esquimalt harbour.

4.30pm: Admiral Kingsmill called on Admiral of the Fleet.

5.00pm: The Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia. Sir Francis Barnard called. Saluted with 15 guns.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

pm: Lieutenant Tollemache RMLI, joined ship from RNB Devonport.

In am: Exercised general drill. Out sheet anchor, away all boat crews.

In pm: General Sir Arthur Currie, GOC Canadian Army, called on Admiral of the Fleet. Cheered ship.

9.00am: Landed small arms companies, Marines and field gun crews for march throuh Victoria.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 6.30pm.

4.17am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour and at 15 knots through Haro Sound and Boundary Passage.

7.20am: East Point abeam 2 miles.

12.05pm: Sister Light abeam 2 miles.

3.00pm: Proceeded as requisite up Discovery Straight, Cape Mudge Light abeam.

3.43pm: Anchored in 19 fathoms in Duncan Bay.

6.30pm: Admiral of the Fleet and staff embarked in SS Malaspina.

Hands employed as requisite, training classes at instruction.

Gunnery and torpedo drills.

11.30am: Admiral of the Fleet returned to ship.

In pm: Prepared for sea and hoisted in boats.

6.45am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite down Discovery Passage.

7.15am: Cape Mudge Light abeam, course 132º, 17 knots.

10.10am: Sisters Light abeam 2 miles.

12.05pm: Courses and speeds as requisite through Burrard Inlet, 1 st Narrows and entering Vancouver Harbour.

1.40pm: Came to port anchor in 8½ fathoms, 5 shackles.

10.00am: Held divine service.

10.30am: Admiral of the Fleet decorated Light Cassidy RNCVR with DSC.

Hands employed as requisite.

11.30am: Discharged one Stoker to detention.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 6.45am, to Boys till 6.30pm.

Hands employed as requisite.

In pm: Leave to starboard watch till 6.45am, to Boys till 6.30pm

6.45am: Weighed and proceeded alongside Western side CPR Pier A. Received oil fuel.

2.00pm: Admiral of the Fleet Viscount Jellicoe and staff and Lady Jellicoe disembarked en route for Ottawa.

3.00pm: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

4.30pm: Struck flag of Admiral of the Fleet Viscount Jellicoe.

6.35pm: Courses as requisite for passing thro&rsquo Boundary Pass and Haro Sound.

6.45pm: East Point Light abeam

7.37pm: Keep Reef Light abeam, 8.5 cables.

8.35pm: Passed Trial Island.

9.20pm: Anchored off Esquimalt.

7.00am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite into Esquimalt harbour.

9.45am: Anchored and secured alongside new coaling pier.

Hands provisioning ship, getting in stores and preparing for coaling.

Commenced coaling ship, hands working in two watches coaling ship.

5.30am: Completed coaling, received 2,260 tons. Hands cleaning ship.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 6.45am.

Hands cleaning ship and ships side. Took in Carpenter&rsquos stores.

4.15pm: Read warrants Nos 71 and 72.

4.30pm: Leave to port watch till 7.00am.

9.30am: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

10.40am: Race Rock abeam, course 280º, 13.5 knots.

2.00pm: Course 257º, 145 revolutions, Cape Flattery abeam.

4.15pm: Read warrants 73 and 74,

11.00am: Reduced to 140 revolutions.

1.25pm: Reduced to 125 revolutions.

7.00am: High land in sight on port beam.

12.10pm: Reduced to 110 revolutions.

7.00pm: Increased to 125 revolutions.

9.45pm: Course 145º, Farallon Island bearing N50ºE.

6.52pm: Course 105º, 135 revolutions.

11.30pm: Course 120º, Heramin Light bearing N77ºE, Anacyn bearing S40ºE.

8.40am: Swung ship for adjustments of compasses.

9.10am: Course 136º, 135 revolutions.

10.00am: San Diego Point bearing S62ºE.

11.00am: Reduced to 10 knots, course 152º.

Noon: Point Loma bearing 062º, 5 miles. Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching and entering San Diego harbour.

1.17pm: Saluted American Flag, 21 guns. Passed Bell buoy.

2.00pm: Came to port anchor and moored 5 on each in 6 fathoms off Santa Fe jetty.

5.30pm: Oiler USS [blank] came alongside. Received 747 tons oil fuel.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating

4.30pm: Admiral Rodman called.

LOGS FOR DECEMBER 1919

[San Diego, Balboa, Colon and Kingston]

8.00am: Dressed ship for the birthday of HM Queen Alexandra.

11.00am: Discharged one rating to USN hospital.

Noon: Fired royal salute, 21 guns.

Hands employed painting ship and as requisite.

San Diego and at sea for Panama

4.30pm: Weighed starboard anchor and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

5.20pm: Course 224º, 12.5 knots. Whistle buoy abeam.

8.30am: Altered course 266º to examine wood.

10.00am: Held divine service, Rev. Crick officiating.

In am: Spread foc&rsquosle awning. Hands mustered and aired bedding.

8.30am: Furled foc&rsquosle awning. Hands scrubbing canvas gear.

Noon: Reduced to 140 revolutions.

1.30pm: Hands employed as requisite and rigging stage.

8.30pm: Ship&rsquos company and officers held a concert.

8.00am: Increased to 145 revolutions.

7.00pm: Reduced to 140 revolutions.

7.04am: Same abeam, 14 miles.

3.30am: San Jose Light bearing N82ºE.

5.00am: Bona Island Light bearing N73ºW. Taboquila Island Light bearing N23ºW.

7.00am: Courses and speeds as requisite for proceeding up dredged channel.

8.05am: Secured starboard side at No 13 wharf, Balboa.

9.30am: Saluted American Flag, 21 guns.

10.15am: British Minister [Sir Claude Mallet] called, saluted him 17 guns.

7.00pm: ROV Uruguay arrived.

10.00am: Held divine service.

In am: American Minister called. Saluted 17 guns.

Japanese Consul called. 7 guns.

French Chargé d&rsquoAffaires called. 13 guns.

Rear Admiral Marbury Johnston USN called. 13 guns.

In am: Senor Porras, President of Panama and Cabinet called, saluted 21 guns on his arrival and departure.

In pm: Captain and officers At Home, 238 visitors.

Bilboa to Colon through Panama Canal

6.15am: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for passing through Panama Canal.

8.15am: Passed through Miraflores Lock.

9.15am: Passed through Culebra Cut.

12.30pm Passed through Gatun Locks.

2.30pm: Secured alongside coaling wharf No 16 at Colon. Commenced coaling ship. Received 752 tons oil fuel.

2.30am: Received 1,449.89 tons of coal.

6.22am: Slipped and proceeded to No 6 wharf, Western side.

4.15pm: Read warrants Nos 76 and 77.

Colon and at sea for Kingston

9.00am: Slipped and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

9.40am: Passed breakwater, course 024º, 150 revolutions.

3.00pm: Passed SS Calcutta Maru Southbound.

Course 024º into NE winds f 5 all day.

8.00am: Course 307º, Plum Point Light ahead.

8.30am: Courses and speeds as requisite for entering harbour.

9.30am: Came to starboard anchor in 7 fathoms, 6 shackles.

12.30pm: Discharged two cases to hospital.

8.15am: USS&rsquo Turner and Ingram [probably Osmond Ingram] proceeded to sea.

4.40pm: HMS Constance returned and anchored.

9.30am: GOC called, saluted 11 guns.

In am: Hands employed as requisite.

In pm: Granted usual leave.

In am: Exercised control parties.

In pm: Received 146 tons oil fuel from SS War Kookri.

In am: A and X turrets at drill. Carried out director test.

5.30pm: HMS Constance proceeded.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 6.45am Monday.

2.30pm: Six ratings discharged to SS Remuera for passage to England.

Hands employed as requisite.

4.40pm: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

6.00pm: Passed HMS Constance. Plum Point Light bearing 338º, 3 miles.

8.12pm: Came to starboard anchor, 7 shackles in 17 fathoms.

Pedro Bluff, at sea for exercises and return

3.15am: Weighed and proceeded course 210º, 12 knots.

6.15am: Portland Rock bearing S50ºW, 5 miles. Courses and speeds as requisite for dropping cutter with marking party and carrying out full calibre 12" practice.

9.00am: Hoisted cutter, Portland Rock bearing NNE.

9.20am: Proceeded course 110º, 12 knots.

1.30pm: Anchored off Pedro Bluff.

LOGS FOR JANUARY 1920

[Jamaica, Cuba, Trinidad and at sea for UK]

Jamaica and at sea for Havana

6.15am: Exercised general drill, prepare to take ship in tow, rigged hand capstan forward.

1.30pm: Paid monthly payment.

6.00pm: Weighed and proceeded, course 208º, 17 knots.

6.30pm: Dropped targets and carried out full calibre 4" night firing, HA [high angle] starshell and 12" sub calibre.

8.10pm: Course 290º, 130 revs.

12.10am: Cape Negril Light abeam,12 miles.

1.35pm: Collier Point bearing 223º.

4.15pm: Dropped both lifebuoys and stopped.

4.24pm: Proceeded course 300º, 11 knots.

8.00pm: Course 072º, Julias Cay Light S59ºE.

11.15pm: Gohernado Light [Gobernadora Point Light] bearing N89ºE.

12.41am: Gobernadora Light abeam, 5.1 miles.

2.10am: Reduced to 10 knots.

4.40am: Havana Light (Morro Castle) abeam

6.30am: Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching and entering Havana harbour.

7.12am: Came to port anchor, 2 shackles in 7 fathoms. Secured to buoy and saluted Cuban flag, 21 guns.

10.00am: Held divine service.

1.30pm: Granted usual leave.

4.30pm: British Chargé d&rsquoaffaires [William Erskine] called, saluted 13 guns.

In am: Prepared ship for coaling.

3.00pm: SS Berwindvale came alongside, rigged collier.

11.30am: SS Berwindvale cast off and proceeded.

In pm: Hands cleaning ship.

4.30pm: Granted leave to watch till 7.00am.

Hands painting ship and as requisite. Granted usual leave.

9.00am: Slipped, weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

9.25am: Course 015º, 160 revolutions.

2.40pm: Course 052º, 140 revs.

3.00pm: Came to starboard anchor, 8 shackles in 20 fathoms, off main ship channel, Key West.

4.15pm: Read warrants 80 to 83 inclusive.

6.00pm: Admiral of the Fleet Lord Jellicoe and staff with Sir R Borden rejoined ship, hoisted flag of Admiral of the Fleet.

2.45am: Weighed and proceeded, course 208º, 170 revolutions.

9.00am: Proceeded as requisite for approaching and entering Havana harbour.

9.20am: Passed Morro Point Light, saluted Cuba 21 guns.

9.30am: Anchored and secured to buoy.

11.30am: Returned salute of Cuban and French Men of War, 19 guns.

1.30pm: Leave to port watch till 11.00pm

9.00am: Landed 300 men for entertainment by Mayor of Havana.

10.30am: French Cruiser Jeanne d&rsquoArc left harbour.

2.00pm: Admiral of the Fleet and officers At Home to English residents and Cuban officials.

4.30pm: Granted usual leave till 11.00 pm.

Havana and at sea for Port Royal

1.00pm: Weighed port anchor. Slipped from buoy and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

1.45pm: Morro Point Light bearing 212º, 2.75 miles. Course 078º, 15 knots.

5.50pm: Piedras Cay Light abeam. 12 miles.

6.55pm: Cruz de Padre Cay abeam, 9.2 miles.

7.12pm: Increased to 175 revolutions.

7.25pm: Bahia Cadiz Cay Light bearing S51ºE, Cruz de Padre Cay bearing S45ºW.

8.06am Lobos Cay Light abeam, 6.2 miles.

11.06am: Maternillos Light abeam, 17 miles.

12.30pm: Sighted apparently large fire on shore.

5.17pm: Punta Lucrecia Light abeam, 9 miles.

6.30pm: Sighted large fire onshore near Punta Lucrecia.

7.20pm: Sighted searchlights bearing N75ºE.

11.00pm: Sighted American battle fleet, six ships, 1 st Atlantic Squadron.

11.46pm: Cape Maysi abeam, 12 miles.

12.37am: Cape Maysi Light abeam, 10 miles.

2.30pm: Plum Light bearing N61ºW.

3.15pm: Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching Port Royal by East channel.

3.50pm: Came to port anchor in 9 fathoms, 6 shackles off Port Royal. Received oil fuel from SS War Kookri.

Port Royal and at sea for Port of Spain

6.00am: Weighed and proceeded as requisite for leaving harbour.

6.50am: Course 118º, 15 knots, Plum Point Light bearing N, 1.5 miles.

3.30pm: Passed American collier Oroon [?] steaming SSW.

10.30am: Reduced to 155 revolutions.

Lat 12.6, Long -65.5 [approx]

8.00pm: Increased to 165 revolutions.

7.30am: Sighted HMS&rsquo Calcutta and Constance, returned salute.

8.20am: Courses and speeds as requisite for approaching harbour.

9.20am: Came to port anchor, 6 shackles in 6 fathoms off Port of Spain.

11.00am: Rear Admiral Sir AF Everett KCMG called on Admiral of the Fleet.

11.30am: Admiral of the Fleet disembarked and shifted flag to Calcutta.

2.00pm: The Governor of Trinidad [Sir John Chancellor] called on Admiral of the Fleet, saluted him 17 guns.

Received oil fuel and prepared for coaling from lighters.

1.30pm: Leave to starboard watch till 6.30am, to Boys of starboard watch till 6.30pm.

Coaled ship from lighters.

4.30pm: Discharged Blacksmith and one Signal rating to HMS Calcutta. One Blacksmith joined ship from same.

8.15pm: RPO* Sidney Robert Thorne, 216932, accidentally drowned whilst on duty.

*Regulating Petty Officer.

3.15pm: Landed funeral party for funeral of the late RPO Sidney Thorne.

6.30pm: Admiral of the Fleet Viscount Jellicoe and staff returned to ship from Government House.

Port of Spain and at sea for Portsmouth

9.20am: Weighed and proceeded, courses and speeds as requisite for leaving harbour and proceeding through Bocas de Grande.

11.00am: Chacachacare Point bearing 095º, 2 miles, course 030º, 150 revolutions.

2.00am: Put clocks on 30 minutes

NE&rsquoly winds f 5-6 all day with rough seas, course NE.

East winds f 5 all day, course NE.

9.30am: Hands mustered by the ledger.

10.00am: Inspection of ship by Admiral of the Fleet Viscount Jellicoe.

11.00am: Held divine service.

10.00am: Inspection of ship by Admiral of the Fleet Viscount Jellicoe. Exercised general quarters etc.


First World War - overview

New Zealand’s response to the outbreak of war was not only a matter of supporting Mother England self-interest was also at work. New Zealand was dependent on the British market for the sale of the wool, frozen meat and dairy products that dominated its economy. Anything that threatened this market threatened New Zealand's livelihood. New Zealand relied on Britain’s naval power to protect its physical integrity and its trade on the long haul to the British market.

HMS New Zealand

In 1909, Prime Minister Sir Joseph Ward reacted to the perceived German threat by announcing that New Zealand would fund the construction of a battlecruiser for the Royal Navy. Construction of HMS New Zealand cost £1.7 million ($275 million in 2014).

On the outbreak of war in 1914 HMS New Zealand joined the 1st Battlecruiser Squadron of the Grand Fleet in the Baltic Sea. It saw action against the German fleet in all three of the major North Sea battles. During the Battle of Jutland in May 1916 Captain Green wore the piu piu (a waist mat or cape with long swinging strands of flax) and tiki (a neck pendant) presented during the 1913 tour, as he had in the earlier battles of Heligoland Bight and Dogger Bank. HMS New Zealand escaped significant damage and casualties and established a reputation as a lucky ship, which some attributed to the piu piu and tiki.

In 1919, Admiral Jellicoe took a Royal Navy fleet on another tour of the dominions to report on their defences, and he chose HMS New Zealand as his flagship. In New Zealand, crowds once more flocked to visit the ship. More than a third of the country’s population of 1.2 million people went aboard during the 11 weeks it was here. Jellicoe returned to New Zealand as Governor-General in 1920.

HMS New Zealand was decommissioned in 1922 and broken up in 1923.

Turning boys into soldiers

Ultimately, New Zealand's greatest contribution to the war effort was the supply of 120,000 service personnel, of whom nearly 100,000 served overseas. The foundations of this massive mobilisation had been laid in the years leading up to war through organisations such as the Boy Scouts and through the introduction of compulsory military training in 1909.

Boy Scouts

Preparing boys for war is not something we associate with the modern scouting movement. Robert Baden-Powell, a lieutenant-general in the British Army, held the first scouting encampment at Brownsea Island in England in 1907. His principles of scouting, published in Scouting for Boys (1908), were based on his earlier military books. Scouting aimed to teach boys ‘peaceful citizenship’ – moral values, patriotism, discipline and outdoor skills – through games and activities and to produce patriots capable of defending the British Empire.

In 1908, David Cossgrove and his wife Selina received Baden-Powell’s permission to organise the Boy Scout movement in New Zealand. Cossgrove, who had met Baden-Powell while serving in the South African War, was convinced of the value of such a movement for young New Zealanders. He wrote to the leading newspapers in the country explaining the nature of scouting. By the end of 1908, there were 36 Scout troops in New Zealand.

Compulsory military training

Growing international tension meant that there was little opposition to the passing of a new Defence Act in December 1909. This replaced the Volunteer Force with a Territorial Force. It also introduced compulsory military training. All boys aged between 12 and 14 had to undergo 52 hours of physical training each year as Junior Cadets (this requirement was dropped in 1912). Teachers surpervised this training. Voluntary cadet groups had existed prior to the passage of the Defence Act.


History of Naval Caps

In the Royal Navy officers wore no uniform until 1748 when the Admiralty introduced uniform regulations. The three sided headdress known as the ‘Tricorne’ was worn after the style of the French with the wide4st part of the rim turned up at the back and the two sides meeting an corner over the nose. During hand-to-hand combat the hat was sometimes turned sideways and probably had a bearing on the next style of hat known as the Bicorne or Cocked Hat.

The officers peaked cap came into use about 1840 to supplement the Cocked Hat, the peaks of senior officer becoming embroidered in gold as part of their rank insignia in 1856. It was changed to an oak leaf design in 1860. When the cap first came into use it had no badge, only a band of gold lace. but during the 1840’s some officers from the warship HMS Queen wore a crown on their caps and these were noticed by and favourably remarked upon by HM Queen Victoria during a visit to the ship. As a result the Admiralty issued an order for crown to be worn as a cap badge for all officers. With the changes to uniform regulations in 1856 a new badge was introduced not unlike the badge used by the RNZN today except the anchor was surrounded by an oval and the overall size was smaller. Today, the cap badge worn by officers is woven gold wire and consists of a fouled anchor surmounted by a crown and the lower part by oak leaves. Today’s officers cap is white plastic covered and has a black patent leather peak which in the case of senior officers has a embroidered oak leaf design all round for Flag Officers [Commodore and above] and the front edge only for Captains and Commanders.

WRNZNS Officer’s hats changed from the black rimmed style in 1942 to a black tricorne type around 1945 which is still in use by the RNZN. The badges were the same officer style but embroidered in blue thread. Later a white cover was introduced and today female officer hats are white plastic with black felt rims. their badges are gold and Commanders wear a thin gold band.

Warrant Officers and Petty Officers:

As senior rates, they wear a similar peaked cap to that worn by officers. The cap badge was given to CPO’s in 1879 when they changed uniform from the ‘Square rig’ [as worn by junior ratings] to a ‘Fore and Aft rig’ [as worn by officers] and consisted of a fouled anchor with an oval surmounted by a crown. In 1920 PO’s went to the ‘fore and Aft rig’ on attaining four year seniority and they were issued with the same cap badge as CPOs. A new badge was introduced for CPOS with a smaller fouled anchor surrounded by a laurel wreath. In 1970 a slightly larger form of this badge was introduced for the new rank of Warrant Officer. Khaki cap covers were worn with khaki uniform during the First and Second World Wars. If berets are worn metal badges are used. WRNZNS senior rates wore the tricorne hat with the appropriate badge.

Junior Ratings:

Junior ratings wore low crowned cocked hats between 1720 and 1820 and there were developed into a waterproof tarpaulin hat similar to a boater but covered in tar from 1820-1857 [a possible origin of the name Jack Tar], Names of ships or ship’s badges were painted on. In 1860 a new sailor’s round cap was introduced which is still in use today. Cap tallys were introduced with the ship’s name in gilt letters. In tropical climates from 1860 a wide-brimmed straw had known as a Sennet became popular and remained in use until 1921 when they were withdrawn from issue. Solar Helmets [Pith helmets], were introduced in 1921 and remained in use for some time and are still used in the RN for ceremonial purposes by the RM. A new sun hat was introduced to the RNZN in 1991. Female junior ratings in the WRNZNS wore wide brimmed black felt hats from 1942 until 1945 when a flat black hat was introduced. Subsequently a white cover was added and the current issue was white plastic covered. Nowadays women wear the same caps as men if junior rates.

The latest headwear has been the introduction of the beret and the ball cap. The ball cap is for use by both officers and ratings.


HMNZS Olphert

Charles Palmer was the driving force behind the formation of a volunteer reserve in New Zealand and in 1925 the Auckland Division of the RNVR (NZ) was formed.It was followed by divisions formed in Wellington, Christchurch, and Dunedin in 1928. The Wellington Division of the RNVR (NZ) was formed on 12 March 1928.

Charles Palmer was the driving force behind the formation of a volunteer reserve in New Zealand and in 1925 the Auckland Division of the RNVR (NZ) was formed. It was followed by divisions formed in Wellington, Christchurch, and Dunedin in 1928. The Wellington Division of the RNVR (NZ) was formed on 12 March 1928. Commander Wybrants Olphert was posted as its first commanding officer. The new unit comprised of two officers and 120 ratings divided into two companies. Commander Olphert remained as commanding officer until 1938 when Captain F.E. Taylor replaced him.

The first home of the division was the top floor of the National Diary Association building on Thorndon Quay. In 1931 when the division expanded to nineteen officers and 180 ratings a new base was located at the first floor of the Public Works Department workshop building on Hinemoa Street.

At this time the volunteers were sorted into various branches for training. For example, the seaman branch received seamanship instruction, rifle and gun drill, rifle shooting, boat work, and rowing. Ratings who were promoted to Able Seamen progressed to either gunnery or minesweeping branches. Signalmen were given a short course in rifle drill and rope work, then trained in semaphore by mechanical arms and flags, Morse code by flag, lantern and sound. Sea training was carried out in the minesweeper HMS Wakakura whose bell is kept today by Olphert. The vessel was assigned to Wellington from October to December each year as part of a rotation policy amongst the four divisions. Exercises in gunnery, minesweeping and seamanship were carried out in the Marlborough Sounds.

Second World War

The outbreak of war suspended Naval Reserve activity. Volunteers were called up for hostility only duty with the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy, or sent to the Royal Navy. During the war over 50 percent of men serving in the Royal Navy were Volunteer Reserve. RNVR officers took command of 2,000 warships including 600 minesweepers, MTBs, MLs and trawlers. One of the most significant officers to come from the Wellington Division was Lieutenant Commander G.J. Macdonald. He had joined the RNVR (NZ) in 1938 and went overseas as an Able Seaman to the United Kingdom was part of the Scheme B recruitment scheme. He was commissioned into service with the Coastal Forces and commanded an MTB and finished the war in command of a flotilla of MTBs. For his services he was awarded a DSO and a DSC with two Bars. He is the most decorated New Zealand naval officer.

Lieutenant Peter Phipps joined the Canterbury Division but transferred to Wellington in 1939. He along with a number of RNVR (NZ) officers were sent to the United Kingdom to command minesweepers serving with the Coastal Forces. He was awarded the DSC for his services in minesweeping. In 1943, he was the commanding officer of the MS/ASW vessel HMNZS Moa which sank the Japanese submarine I-1 alongside HMNZS Kiwi. He was awarded the Bar to his DSCV and the US Navy Cross. Post war he commanded the shore establishment HMNZS Philomel and was Executive Officer of HMNZS Bellona. He also commissioned HMNZS Royalist into RNZN service. He ended his career as the first Chief of Defence in 1966.

Sixteen Wellington RNVR men were lost in December 1941 while serving in HMS Neptune. Two other men were lost as gunners serving in the DEMS RMS Rotorua that was sunk in 1940. Thirty-one men lost their lives serving during the war.

The Wellington Division of the RNZNVR was reformed in 1946 and the commanding officer was Captain F.E. Taylor who had been in command of the old RNVR formation in 1939. By the early 1950s the strength of the Division was 33 officers and 240 ratings. Captain Taylor remained as commanding officer until 1957. During this time the cuff braid that distinguished VR officers was discontinued and standardised across all parts of the RNZN.

The introduction by the government of compulsory military training saw the strength of the RNZNVR rise dramatically. Men who chose naval service were given fourteen weeks basic training at HMNZS Tamaki then remained attached to their nearest Division for three years. A HDML P3562 was attached to Olphert that had served during the Second World War based at Shelly Bay. This vessel remained in service for over 24 years and was at sea an average of 100 days per year.

In 1958 the compulsory military training was discontinued and the RNZNVVR returned to a purely voluntary organisation with a reduction in numbers under training. In the 1960s, with the arrival of the new frigates a new training programme was set up for officers and ratings based around service on the frigates focused on gunnery and anti-submarine warfare. The role of the RNZNVR at this time was to train volunteers that would supplement the RNZN fleet.

In 1964, the Naval Reserve was brought under the command of Commodore Auckland after the disestablishment of the Naval Board. Following this step, men who joined the RNZNVR were allowed to join a branch based on their civilian occupation. P3562 was replaced by the SDML HMNZS Manga. Once a year the SDMLs from the RNZNVR would participate in a joint exercise that formed a valuable part of seamanship training for ratings and officers. In 1968 Manga was involved in the rescue effort after the sinking of the Wahine. The fleet of SDMLs was rotated between the divisions and HMNZS Kuparu was the last SDML to serve with the Division and was decommissioned in 1984.

In the 1970s pay restrictions were lifted and the Wellington Division was able to give a good account of itself despite the considerable scrutiny by the Ministry of Defence. In 1978 the RNZNVR was restructured so that the reservists were to be trained in handling small ships and to serve in the administration of Naval Control of Shipping.

In the late 1970s and early 1980s the VR Officers and ratings worked well with the RNZN. With the addition of the four Lake-class patrol craft in 1975 to the fleet this provided a good opportunity for sea time for the VR as these vessels carried out fisheries patrols.

In 1985 four inshore patrol craft were commissioned into RNZN service. HMNZS Wakakura was assigned to Olphert. Initially there were fisheries patrols but this was discontinued following government policy changes. But the new vessels allowed a return to fleet training exercises under the new Maritime Commander New Zealand (formerly Commodore Auckland). Wakakura had a greater range and better seakeeping abilities than the SDMLs and were good vessels to carry out a broad range of seamanship training. The usefulness of the vessel was demonstrated when Wakakura help co-ordinate the rescue operation when the Russian cruise liner Mikhail Lermontov sank.

1990s to Present

Olphert has changed with the time especially the introduction of women to sea service. After 1989 when women began to train alongside men, there have been women volunteers. This took a period of adjustment as it did for the RNZN as a whole. Along with the Naval Control of Shipping the 1990s saw the focus extended to include mine countermeasures for the seagoing branches. This has been included in the VR training programme. HMNZS Wakakura was decommissioned in 2007 and presently Olphert does not have its own vessel. However with the introduction of the Project Protector patrol vessels there is again opportunity for sea training.

On 31 May 2015 HMNZS Olphert was decommissioned as a shore establishment as the buildings were too expensive to earthquake proof and the Wellington Division of the RNZNVR will be relocated.

The Shore Establishment

The base at Hinemoa Street remained in operation until 1969. In 1970 the Ministry of Defence took over a lease of a Cadbury’s warehouse in Ghuznee Street. The ratings and officers of Olphert took six months to refurbish the building for use by the RNZNVR. This was only a temporary home as costs lead the RNZN to seek alterative quarters.

The reorganisation of the NZ Army left the Home Command Building in Buckle Street vacant and the decision was made to relocate HMNZS Olphert to this building. The shift took place in 1978. Until 1986 the building was shared with the Defence Services Transport Pool. Again, the ratings and officers of Olphert put a lot of effort into refurbishing the building for naval use. To the present this remains the base for Olphert.

Ship’s Badge:

The badge was originally going to be a replication of the Olphert family crest which was a dove holding an olive branch with the motto Dum Spiro Spero (While I live, I hope). The design was submitted to the College of Heralds in London who rejected it and came up with a falcon’s claw holding an arrow rising from the sea. This was accepted and established as the official badge. This was the first unit of the RNZN to be named after a New Zealander.


Malayan Emergency & Indonesian Confrontation

Outcome: Defeat for communists and one of the 20 th century’s most successful counter-insurgency operations. By 1954 the communist leadership departed for Indonesia which would lead to the Confrontation in the 1960s. At the peak of the emergency in 1951 the MCP fielded near to 8,000 men.[1] The emergency was declared over with the death of 7,000 communist insurgents.[2] New Zealand’s contribution to the Commonwealth Strategic Reserve had ‘little real impact on the Emergency which was in its closing stages.’[3]

Area of Operations: Malayan Peninsula and littoral waters

NZ Army: two battalions (800-1000 men each) from Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment, 1 st Squadron New Zealand Special Air Service – total 1600 men RNZAF: three squadrons and one flight – 1160 men

RNZN: Ships were deployed as part of RN Far East Fleet then the Commonwealth Strategic Reserve from 1955 when New Zealand shifted its defence commitment from the Middle East to South East Asia.[4]

Deployments made by RNZN vessels during Malayan Emergency

In 1954 NZ committed itself to deploying two cruisers and two or three frigates to the ANZAM (Australia, New Zealand and Malaya) region to be used for anti-submarine & anti-raider convoy escort if a serious war broke out.[5]

HMNZS Pukaki deployment 21 September 1953 – 28 September 1954

In July 1954 Pukaki carried out a shore bombardment of a suspected guerrilla camp.[6] She was also on anti-piracy and fisheries protection patrols off the Malayan coast.

HMNZS Kaniere deployment 1 January 1954 – July 1955

She carried out anti-piracy and fisheries protection patrols of the Malayan coast.

HMNZS Pukaki Deployment to Far East Fleet 28 April 1955- Returned to NZ April 1956

Anti-piracy patrols in Sulu Sea.

HMNZS Black Prince deployment to Far East Fleet 5 May 1955 – Returned to NZ July 1955

HMNZS Kaniere deployment 6 February 1956-Returned to NZ 29 May 1957 Included anti-piracy patrols off Borneo and fisheries protection patrols of the Malayan coast.

HMNZS Royalist deployment to Commonwealth Strategic Reserve 20 May 1957-Returned to NZ 4 July 1958 On 25 July 1957 Royalist fired 86 rounds in shore bombardment of MCP guerrillas at Kota Tinggi. On 20 Feb 1958 she fired 152 rounds in a shore bombardment of MCP guerrillas at Tanjun Punggai

HMNZS Rotoiti Deployed to Commonwealth Strategic Reserve 6 April 1958 – Returned to NZ 3 August 1959 Anti-piracy patrols in October 1958

HMZNS Royalist Deployed to Commonwealth Strategic Reserve 7 February 1959-Returned to NZ 26 June 1959

HMNZS ­Pukaki Deployed to Commonwealth Strategic Reserve 4 May 1959 – Returned to NZ 9 May 1960

HMNZS Rotoiti Deployed to Commonwealth Strategic Reserve 11 April 1960 – Returned to NZ 9 March 1961

Indonesian Confrontation

Dates: 8 December 1962 to 11 August 1966 – Peace treaty signed

Protagonists: Indonesian army and naval forces under President Sukarno vs. British and Commonwealth naval and army units

Area of Operations: Sultanate of Brunei, island of Borneo, Malaya, littoral waters of Java Sea and South China Sea, Malaccan Strait.

History & Outcome: The first event was the attempt by Indonesia to ferment an uprising in Brunei that the British swiftly pressed. Indonesia then turned to the conduct of series of raids, commerce interdiction, and minor skirmishing rather than commit to full blown combat known as Konfrontasi (Confrontation). Indonesia also tried to break the newly formed Federation of Malaysia (Consisting of Malaya, Sarawak and North Borneo). The Confrontation ended as a result of an attempted coup by Communists in Indonesia which resulted in a bloody repression.[7] This should be seen as an attempt by communists in the region to carry on after the defeat of the insurgency in Malaya. Enemy action was concluded by June 1966.[8]

Initially the British and Commonwealth forces attempted to defence the 1600km border. By 1964 they were running Operation CLARET – cross border operations to track and destroy Indonesian units. By 1965 60,000 service personnel were serving in the area along side two aircraft carriers and 80 surface ships.[9] Between 1963 and 1966 over 50 vessels from the Far East Fleet and the Malaysian Navy were deployed on nightly patrols. Despite the fact that there were no major engagements, this was a classic use of naval force to deny the Indonesian Navy use of the sea and enable the Commonwealth naval forces freedom of movement to Borneo.[10]

NZ Army: two battalions (800-1000 men each) from Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment Four detachments from New Zealand Special Air Service – total 1600

RNZAF: two squadrons 300 men

RNZN: Deployments were made by the cruiser Royalist frigates HMNZS Taranaki, Otago minesweepers HMNZS Hickleton, Stanton. Ships deployed as part of Commonwealth Strategic Reserve. This was a commitment that ‘stretched the Navy’s manpower to its limits.’[11]

HMNZS Otago 12 March 1962 – Returned to NZ 10 Oct 1962

HMNZS Taranaki 12 March 1962 – Returned to NZ April 1963

HMNZS Royalist 25 February 1963 – Returned to NZ 9 July 1963

HMNZS Otago 1 April 1963 – Returned to NZ 15 December 1963

HMNZS Taranaki 11 September 1963 – Returned to NZ 7 September 1964

HMNZS Otago 18 July 1964 – Returned to NZ 26 May 1965 Conducted operational patrols off Borneo and acted as guardship at Tawau.

HMNZS Royalist 15 March 1965 – Returned to NZ 17 November 1965 (had breakdown at sea) Conducted operational patrols off Borneo.

10 April 1965, Two Ton-class minesweepers HMNZS Hickleton and HMNZS Stanton commissioned to join RNZN. Deployed to Confrontation as part of RN’s 11 th Minesweeping Squadron.[12] These two ships served with HMNZS Taranaki running anti-infiltration patrols around the island of Borneo and in the Singapore and Malacca Straits.[13] The administrative & support base for operations was located aboard the RN ship HMS Mull of Kintyre.[14]These were the first ships of the RNZN to carry a black kiwi on their funnels. Their pennant numbers were painted out when they were in operation.

HMNZS Taranaki 13 August 1965 – Returned to NZ May 1966

Conducted operational patrols and guardship at Tawau. Rescued SS No Sang stuck on reef off Borneo.

HMNZS Otago 7 February 1966 – Returned to NZ 2 September 1966 Conducted operational patrols

Key naval event:

On 28 June 1966 HMNZS Hickleton opened fire on a sampan carrying armed infiltrators in the approaches to Singapore. When fired upon the New Zealand ship replied killing two Indonesians and wounding one. The CO of Hickleton LT CDR Peter Wright was awarded the DSC and a rating AB Charles Taylor received the DSM.[15] This was the last time that a ship from the RNZN fired its guns in anger. Both Hickleton and Stanton were returned to the Royal Navy in September 1966 and paid off on 5 November 1966 and 4 December 1966 respectively.[16]

[1] Christopher Pugsley, ‘Malayan Emergency’, The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Military History, Ian McGibbon (ed.), Auckland: Oxford University Press, 2000, p. 291.

[2] Kenneth Macksey, William Woodhouse, The Penguin Encyclopedia of Modern Warfare: From the Crimean War to the Present Day, London: Penguin, 1993, p. 204. See also Williamson A. Murray, Geoffrey Parker, ‘The Post War World’, The Cambridge History of Warfare, Geoffrey Parker (ed.), Cambridge: Cambridge University press, 2005, pp. 374-375.

[3] Christopher Pugsley, From Emergency to Confrontation: The New Zealand Armed Forces in Malaya and Borneo 1949-66, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2003, p. 354.

[4] ibid., p. 45. See also Christopher Pugsley, ‘Malayan Emergency’, The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Military History, Ian McGibbon (ed.), Auckland: Oxford University Press, 2000, p. 294.

[6] Christopher Pugsley, ‘Malayan Emergency’, The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Military History, Ian McGibbon (ed.), Auckland: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 293-294.

[7] Kenneth Macksey, William Woodhouse, The Penguin Encyclopedia of Modern Warfare: From the Crimean War to the Present Day, London: Penguin, 1993, pp. 162-163.

[8] John Subritzky, ‘Confrontation’, The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Military History, Ian McGibbon (ed.), Auckland: Oxford University Press, 2000, p.114.

[10] Christopher Pugsley, From Emergency to Confrontation: The New Zealand Armed Forces in Malaya and Borneo 1949-66, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2003, p. 250.

[12] Grant Howard, Grant, Portrait of the Royal New Zealand Navy: A Fiftieth Anniversary Collection, Wellington: Grantham House, Wellington. 1991, pp. 110.

[13] Denis Fairfax, ‘Royal New Zealand Navy’, The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Military History, Ian McGibbon (ed.), Auckland: Oxford University Press, 2000, pp. 466-467.

[14] Christopher Pugsley, From Emergency to Confrontation: The New Zealand Armed Forces in Malaya and Borneo 1949-66, Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2003, p. 246.

[15] Grant Howard, Grant, Portrait of the Royal New Zealand Navy: A Fiftieth Anniversary Collection, Wellington: Grantham House, Wellington. 1991, 110.


3. The Griffin

Lake Michigan. (Credit: Getty Images)

The first sailing ship to cruise the Great Lakes, Griffin (or Le Griffon) was a three-masted vessel built by the French explorer Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle during an early expedition to the North American frontier. La Salle used Griffin to travel the Niagara River and explore parts of Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, but the ship later disappeared in September 1679 after setting sail from present-day Green Bay with six crewmen and a cargo of furs. Its true fate remains a mystery, though it’s commonly believed that the ship may have foundered in a storm or been scuttled by a mutinous crew. Legions of searchers have tried to track down its watery grave, but so far none of their discoveries has been confirmed to be the so-called “holy grail of Great Lakes shipwrecks.” A false alarm came in 2014, when two treasure hunters were reported to have found the fabled ship in the waters of Lake Michigan. Unfortunately, a subsequent investigation revealed that the wreck was most likely a steam-powered ship from the 19th or 20th centuries.


10 Things You May Not Know About Captain James Cook

1. Cook joined the Royal Navy relatively late in life.
Cook worked on a Yorkshire farm in his youth before winning an apprenticeship with a merchant sailing company at age 17. He cut his teeth as a mariner on shipping voyages in the choppy waters of North and Baltic Seas, and spent the next decade rising through the ranks and mastering the art of navigation. He was being groomed to become a captain, but in 1755, he shocked his superiors by quitting his merchant sailing career and enlisting in the British Royal Navy as a common seaman. Cook was 26�r older than most new recruits—yet it didn’t take long for the Navy to recognize his talent. He was promoted to ship’s master in only two years, and later became one of the first men in British naval history to rise through the enlisted ranks and take command of his own vessel.

2. He was an expert mapmaker.
Cook first rose to prominence as a cartographer during the Seven Years’ War, when his detailed charts of the Saint Lawrence River helped the British pull off a surprise attack against French-held Quebec. In the early 1760s, he was given a ship and tasked with charting the island of Newfoundland off the coast of Canada. The map he produced was so accurate that it was still in use in the 20th century. Cook’s skill at charting the seas would later become a crucial tool in his explorer’s arsenal. He won command of his first round-the-world voyage in part because he could be trusted to navigate in uncharted territory and bring home precise maps of the lands he discovered.

Cook landing at Botany Bay.

3. Cook’s first voyage included a secret mission from the British government.
Cook’s career as an explorer began in August 1768, when he left England on HM Bark Endeavour with nearly 100 crewmen in tow. Their journey was ostensibly a scientific expedition—they were charged with sailing to Tahiti to observe the transit of Venus across the face of the sun𠅋ut it also had a hidden military agenda. Cook carried sealed orders instructing him to seek out the “Great Southern Continent,” an undiscovered landmass that was believed to lurk somewhere near the bottom of the globe. The explorer followed orders and sailed south to the 40th parallel, but found no evidence of the fabled continent. He then turned west and circled New Zealand, proving it was a pair of islands and not connected to a larger landmass. Cook would later resume his search for the Southern Continent during his second circumnavigation of the globe in the early 1770s, and came tantalizingly close to sighting Antarctica before pack ice forced him to turn back.

4. His ship Endeavour nearly sank on the Great Barrier Reef.
After landing in Australia during his first voyage, Cook pointed his ship north and headed for the Dutch seaport of Batavia. Because he was in unmapped territory, he had no idea he was sailing directly into the razor-sharp coral formations of the Great Barrier Reef. On June 11, 1770, his ship Endeavour slammed into a coral reef and began taking on water, endangering both his crew and his priceless charts of his Pacific discoveries. Cook’s men frantically pumped water out of the holds and threw cannons and other equipment overboard to lighten the ship’s weight. They even used an old sail to try and plug a hole in their hull. After more than 20 desperate hours, they finally stopped the leak and limped toward the Australian coast. It would take Cook nearly two months of repairs to make his ship seaworthy again.

Painting showing Cook’s ships Resolution and Adventure in Tahiti.

5. Cook helped pioneer new methods for warding off scurvy.
In the 18th century, the specter of scurvy𠅊 disease caused by a lack of vitamin C—loomed over every long distance sea voyage. Cook, however, managed to keep all three of his expeditions nearly scurvy-free. This was partially because of his obsession with procuring fresh food at each of his stops, but many have also credited his good fortune to an unlikely source: sauerkraut. While Cook didn’t know the cure or cause of scurvy, he did know that the nutrient-rich pickled cabbage seemed to keep the disease at bay, so he brought several tons of it on his voyages. His only problem was getting his crew to eat it. To trick them, Cook simply had sauerkraut 𠇍ressed every day” for the officers’ table. When the enlisted men saw their superiors eating it, they assumed it was a delicacy and requested some for themselves.

6. Even Britain’s enemies respected Cook.
While Cook’s journeys took place during a time when Britain was variously at war with the United States, Spain and France, his reputation as a pioneering explorer allowed him to travel the seas with relative impunity. In July 1772, a squadron of Spanish vessels briefly detained his ships, only to release them after they realized Cook in command. Likewise, when Cook’s third voyage set sail during the American Revolution, Benjamin Franklin wrote a memo to colonial ship captains instructing them to treat the British vessels as 𠇌ommon friends to mankind” if they encountered them at sea.

7. He searched for the Northwest Passage.
In 1776, a 47-year-old Cook set sail on his third voyage of discovery—this time a search for the elusive Northwest Passage in the Arctic. After traveling halfway around the world, he led the ships HMS Resolution and Discovery on a perilous survey of the upper coasts of western Canada and Alaska. Cook came within 50 miles of the western entrance to the passage, but his attempts to locate it were ultimately thwarted by freezing weather, violent currents and heavy ice floes in the Bering Sea. When the extreme conditions drove his crew to the brink of mutiny, Cook reluctantly turned south for the summer. He would die before he had a chance to resume his search.


1953: HMS Tactician

It was not until August 1953 that New Zealand was first officially visited by a military submarine. That boat was HMS Tactician, a World War II T Class model.

Of course, New Zealand had been unofficially visited by German and Japanese subs prior to this in an unfriendly way. The first submarine in our waters was New Zealand made and the remains still exist. In August 1873 the New Zealand Submarine Gold Mining Co had constructed the Platypus as a means of extracting gold from deep rivers¹. Although it did not work out commercially, the idea seems to have been quite practical and the trials a success.

HMS Tactician

All T Class subs appear to have been given names that start with T. Of the three such that visited New Zealand, Tactician was the first. The British sub left Australia for New Zealand on 8 August, 1953², giving our military some exercise but in particular offering the public some goodwill.

New Zealand, and the British Empire was in need of some steadying after the hardships of WW2. Five years before, New Zealand had done as it was told and created its own citizenship in the act of extinguishing British Citizenship for its people. By the end of the decade British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan put the writing on the wall with his Wind of Change speech The Empire’s days were winding up. Yet for now, in 1953, we were still trying to hold it together. It was the year a New Zealander proved its worth by sending its son to conquer Everest for the Empire. Also the year our Monarch physically visited this country for the first time. Even the USA sent their Vice President, Richard Nixon, to make friends with the New Zealanders in October of the same year. Yet as J.K. Baxter observed in his poetry, the post-war years had started to go sour for ‘we’ Brits. It was more than could be fixed by a friendly submarine.

“Do you know if this is a picture of HMS Tactician. Taken in Milford Sound New Zealand in 1953, a friend has just put it on Facebook. The photo was taken by his father and he would be interested to know.” – Fred Singleton

“Tactician did a goodwill tour all round New Zealand, calling in a lot of the different ports. Commander H.R. Clutterbuck was in charge.”- Nancy Phillips

I was Scratcher in Tactician in 1953 and yes we did the Kiwi jaunt that year. There were only the three T’s out here then Tactician, Thorough and Telemachus. So assuming the year given is right that is definitely Tactician (she was the only one with the gun turret the others were open to the weather) but I can’t work out what the white Bridge is all about as it was a time when every effort was being put into camouflage. All my tiddly white seizings on the main Aerial had to be blackened and in those days we had guard rails so all my white stanchions went black we had been shown a picture of a boat at 90 Ft and it looked like a lit up XMAS tree.”- Ray Jamieson

Ref. Norm of The Chief Stoker’s Log (2016)

The above remarks refer to the colour image above but a second picture emerged last week in Christchurch. The photo sold on Trade Me for $81.00. It’s not proven but in my opinion it’s the same occasion shown in both pictures- Tactician at Milford Sound. (Military celebrity following in the footsteps of Kitchener.)

Image ref. B&W photo of sub at Milford Sound Photo listed on Trade Me by WillandJoe, Feb 2020 Modified by AHNZ

Image ref. Colour photo of sub at Milford Sound Shared by a friend of Fred Singleton to Norm of The Chief Stoker’s Log (2016) Up Periscope Submarines Australia


Watch the video: Travelstories live 01 - Αυστραλία, Νέα Ζηλανδία και Νησιά Ειρηνικού (September 2022).


Comments:

  1. Kaphiri

    This answer, is matchless

  2. Medwyn

    Interesting blog, added to rss reader

  3. Taugami

    hurray, hurray ... wait



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