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Santa Paula SP-1590 - History

Santa Paula SP-1590 - History


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Santa Paula

(SP-1590: dp. 13,000; 1. 420'5/8", b. 53'9"; dr.28'41/4 ; s. 13 k.; cpl. 100; a. 1 6-pdr.)

Santa Paula (SP-1590), a single-screw, steel freighter built during 1917 by William Cramp & Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa., was acquired on 14 August 1918 by the United States Navy from W. R. Grace Steamship Co., of New York City and commissioned on 15 August 1918, Lt. Comdr. David J. Wade, USNRF, in command.

Santa Paula was assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (NOTS) to carry cargo for United States forces fighting in France. She only completed one round-trip voyage, from New York to Marseilles and back, with 8,340 tons of general cargo, before the war's end. Santa Paula made a second voyage to Marseilles between 21 November and 14 January 1919 with supplies to sustain United States forces still in France before she was transferred to the Cruiser and Transport Force on 17 January.

Santa Paula then returned American troops home from France during four additional round-trip voyages from New York to Brest Bordeaux, and St. Nazaire between 22 March and 1 August. When the last of these voyages ended at New York, the ship was turned over to the custody of the Commandant, 3d Naval District and was decommissioned on 21 August 1919 and simultaneously returned to her owner. Renamed Montanan during 1925, the ship remained under United States registry until she was sunk by submarine torpedoes, in the Indian Ocean, on 3 June 1943.


Santa Paula, California

Santa Paula is steeped in history. Wafting from its vintage brew are the heady fragrances of oil and citrus. Birthplace of the Union Oil Company of California and Citrus Capital of the World are just two of Santa Paula’s claims to fame. It has also been a center of the silent movie business when Gaston Melies held sway here with his Star Film Stock Company and home of the largest lemon ranch in the world.

Today Santa Paula has the greatest collection of vintage homes, commercial buildings, churches and schools in Southern California, and is the home of the Santa Paula Airport, Aviation Museum of Santa Paula, the California Oil Museum, and the Limoneira Company. Equally historic is the Santa Paula Cemetery which dates to the early 1870s and continues to serve the city. In addition, farms of the pioneers continue to produce under the skilled supervision of their farming descendants.

Surrounded by a sea of verdant agriculture, Santa Paula remains a preserved jewel basking in the Southern California sunshine.


The hotel was built in 1911 when Santa Paula was growing and prospering as an oil town and was headquarters to Union Oil. The Tudor-Craftsman hotel was designed by famed architects Burns and Hunt and funded by a consortium of twenty-five wealthy townsmen each of whom wanted one thousand dollars for its construction. It was erected directly opposite the train depot to provide accommodations to the many newcomers lured to the area by the burgeoning oil and citrus industries, and to provide a gathering place for Santa Paula's growing high society circles.

Beginning in the 1910s, Hollywood discovered the valley hamlet of Santa Paula. [2] Its ruggedly picturesque vistas and hills – improbably close to the sprawl of Los Angeles - provided a setting for numerous Westerns. Many Universal film professions either stayed at the hotel or ate in the restaurant during these early years. The hotel also hosted William Jennings Bryan and famous pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski. In later years, western stars like Randolph Scott visited the hotel while on location. [3]

Because of its popularity, the hotel struggled to house visitors to Santa Paula. After city leaders sold the hotel in 1919, the Glen Tavern's new owner, Charles Estep, converted the hotel's unused attic space into a third floor for guests, completing the conversion around 1920. [4]

Eventually, as oil money and old Hollywood moved on, Santa Paula settled down into a quieter constancy of agriculture and small-town life Americana. In June 1943, during World War II, the U.S. Federal Public Housing Authority leased the property from Estep. The government then converted the hotel into a woman's dormitory for employees working at nearby Port Hueneme. In 1946, the lease ended and the Glen Tavern once again functioned as a hotel. [5]

By the 1960s, the train depot became defunct, and likewise, economic development bypassed the town. For the next half-century the hotel endured a marginal existence, alternating owners and uses many times as it slowly sank into flophouse decrepitude until it was eventually rescued by developers with intentions of restoring its original grandeur.

From 2005 through 2007, the Glen Tavern Inn was extensively renovated by the Jennett Investment Group. Mid-renovation, in April 2006, the hotel sustained a fire. Fortunately, firefighters were able to douse the blaze in time to save the landmark from major harm, and the burned portion was rebuilt.

It reopened as a full-service hotel, restaurant and lounge in 2007. The renovation preserved the Inn's historical attributes alongside the addition of more modern amenities. [6]

On February 24, 2008, the Glen Tavern Inn was awarded Certificates of Special Recognition from the United States Senate, United States Congress and the California State Assembly for the successful restoration project. [7]

Keeping with the hotel's motto "Where the Past Comes to Life" the Inn is allegedly haunted. [8] In July 2007, the Ventura Paranormal Society held its annual convention there. [9] In 2013, the inn was featured on an episode of Ghost Adventures with special guests Brit Morgan and Mimi Page. In 2014, the inn was featured on an episode of The Dead Files.

One common urban legend maintains that during Prohibition, the Inn's third floor was utilized as a speakeasy, brothel and gambling parlor. [10] But this is not the case. The third-floor brothel story was invented in the mid-1980s to promote the hotel's haunted reputation and does match historical records. Many other legends, including tales of a murdered prostitute and gambler, were also fabricated for the same purpose. [11]


The Glen Tavern Inn was built in 1911 and is known for its colorful history. At the time it was built, Santa Paula was growing and prospering as an oil town and was headquarters for Union Oil. The Tudor-Craftsman style hotel was designed by famed architects, Burns and Hunt, and was funded by a consortium of wealthy townsmen each of whom wanted one thousand dollars for its construction. The three-story Inn was erected directly across from the train depot to provide accommodations to the many newcomers and businessmen lured to the area by the burgeoning oil and citrus industries. It also furnished a central gathering place for Santa Paula’s growing high-society circles.

During Prohibition, the Inn retained some of its Wild West origins as the third floor – at that time an open space not yet built out into separate guestrooms – harbored a speakeasy, brothel and gambling parlor. Many hotel legends stem from this era, including tales of murdered prostitutes and shootouts between unruly gamblers. These stories, though hard to confirm, persist with a life of their own as part of the hotel’s rich lore.

Also in the 1930s, Hollywood discovered the valley hamlet of Santa Paula. Its rugged vistas and hills – improbably close to the sprawl of Los Angeles – made an irresistible setting for Western films. The Glen Tavern is the place to stay, hosted such notables as Carol Lombard, John Wayne, Houdini, and canine thespian Rin Tin Tin, who boasted his own suite long before “pet-friendly” entered the hospitality lexicon.

EVP Evidence

GHOST STORIES

Keeping with the hotel’s motto, “Where the Past Comes to Life,” even the dead reportedly maintain a vivid presence at the Inn. The Glen Tavern is a favorite of paranormal aficionados who insist it is one of the most haunted venues in the region. In fact, in 2007 the Ventura Paranormal Society held its annual convention there. The hotel has also been featured in several books and documentaries about haunted places. While for some these tales are just for fun, ghost anecdotes definitely do abound, as believers in the uncanny report encounters with long-expired guests who for whatever reason prefer to remain indefinitely, giving new meaning to the term ”extended stay.”

Eventually, as oil money and old Hollywood moved on, Santa Paula traded fortune, vice and glamour for the quieter constancy of agriculture and small-town Americana. The train depot became defunct, and likewise, economic development bypassed the town. For the next half century, the hotel endured a marginal existence, alternating owners and users as it sank into flophouse decrepitude until 2004. It was rescued by the current owners who acquired it with the aim of restoring its original grandeur.

RENAISSANCE

By 2007 the hotel was renovated top-to-bottom and reopened as a full-service hotel, restaurant, and lounge. It is frequently rented for private parties and events and has reclaimed its once-faded status as a center for local social life. Guests and others can also enjoy fine dining at Enzo’s Italian Restaurant located within. In 2008 the Tavern owners were awarded Certificates of Special Recognition from the United States Senate, the United States Congress and the California State Assembly for their distinguished restoration of this irreplaceable landmark. The renovation took pains to preserve the Inn’s unique historical attributes alongside the addition of more modern amenities. Also revived was the Inn’s fabled glamor, as visitors can now relive the gilded days of excess and adventure in a place where spirited revelers and restless spirits seem to commingle quite amicably.

The Glen Tavern has recently been featured on MTV’s Teen Cribs, Ghost Adventures, The Dead Files and the CNN Headline News travel series Southern California’s Best Kept Secrets. Alas, the secret is out. We hope you enjoyed your visit. Thank you for coming, please return, and tell your friends.


SS Santa Paula (1916)

SS Santa Paula (later SS Montanan) was a freighter of the Grace Line and later the American-Hawaiian Steamship Company. The vessel also saw military transport service during both World Wars.

Built at William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding Company in Philadelphia, the vessel was completed in April 1917. She was named Santa Paula and entered commercial service for the Grace Line. Α]

After the United States entered World War I, the vessel was requisitioned by the US Navy in August 1918 and became the commissioned USS Santa Paula ID-1590. Β] She was assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation Service to carry cargo for United States forces fighting in France. She only completed one round-trip voyage, from New York to Marseilles and back, with 8,340 tons of general cargo, before the war ended. Γ]

Navy Transport Santa Paula in 1919.

Santa Paula again sailed to Marseilles between 21 November and 14 January 1919, thie time with supplies for US forces still in France. She was then transferred to the Cruiser and Transport Force. In late January transported American troops home from France and would make four more round-trip voyages from New York to Brest Bordeaux, and St. Nazaire between 22 March and 1 August. When the last of these voyages ended at New York, the ship was turned over to the custody of the Commandant, 3d Naval District and was decommissioned on 21 August 1919 and simultaneously returned to the Grace Line. Γ]

Santa Paula resumed service for the Grace Line. By 1925 the intracoastal service had become unprofitable. The American-Hawaiian Steamship Company however was seeking to expand its Pacific service and negotiated the purchase of six ships, including Santa Paula, from the Grace Line. She was renamed SS Montanan (American-Hawaiian's first SS Montanan had been sunk in WWI) and entered Pacific intercoastal service for her new owners. Δ] During her inter-war service she carried goods from Los Angeles and San Francisco to the Canal Zone and also made coastal voyages. Ε] Montanan was in the Arabian Sea on June 3, 1943 sailing as a civilian transport vessel. At 150 miles South of Masirah Island, Oman she was sunk by the Imperial Japanese Navy submarine I-27 Γ] Ζ] At 0735 a torpedo struck on the starboard side of the No. 2 hold, igniting the bunker fuel tanks and sending flames up the foremast. Just seven minutes later the ship sank bow first. Master Charles Harry McGahan was killed along with four other crew members and two of the Armed Guard. Survivors either jumped overboard or boarded her four lifeboats. Survivors in Life Boat No. 2 sailed for two days before rescue by the dhow Naranpasha. They were transferred to the armed trawler HMIS Baroda and arrived at Port Okha, on June 11, 1943. Survivors in the other boats reached Masirah Island. Η]


Santa Paula SP-1590 - History

Discusses his life in Santa Paula, his work in the grocery business

A magazine for citrus marketing

ON June 1, 1931 an auction was held selling virus. This brochure lists what was being sold by California city, and the amount

Hand typed copy of the digest done by Harry Roddick, for the U. S. Soil Erosion Service

A group of articles and photos of and about Albert Call

Discusses living in Santa Paula and on the Limoniera Ranch as a child, and the depression

One wooden handmade notebook

Discussion of memories about her family, education and teaching at Santa Paula High

A discussion of the Chumash Indians, their customs, tries and groups, influence of Missions, also archaeology

Collection contains posters used for an exhibit on churches in Santa Paula

Episcopal Church, Marriot, Nichols, Max Rudlf, Presbyterian Church, Bouseman, Granger, Anderson, Roy Wilson sr., Joseph Leavens, C.L. Sheldon, Christian Church, St. Sebastian Church, Francis Laubacher, Universalist Church, John Nichols, Guadalupe Church, Nelson, First United Methodist Church, Elizabeth Blanchard,

The collection is of copies of the handwritten minutes of the Council Board meetings in the year 1902.

Map of Santa Paula from Palm Ave east: Harvard and Main Streets

This was a paper read at an Ebell Club meetingDiscusses early days in Santa Paula

Discusses his life in Santa paula and military service

Several papers about the Converse School, news clipping, history of the school, and an autobiography of Marjorianne Zapf about her experiences at the Ranch School.

Contains two documents: an opium order and a dedication

Two sets of plans including fixture plans for M. F. Ringle, owner

Discusses her life story, where born and lived

Rating Code used by The Credit Bureau

Discussed moving to California becoming a barber on Main Street and agriculture in Santa Paula

This is a Fireside Chat, a discussion of the use of plow horses, their breeds and breeding them

Discusses her life in Santa Paula: experience in the Saint Francis Dam Disaster, farming, school tradions


Santa Paula SP-1590 - History

Santa Barbara , a 6621 gross ton freighter, was built at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1916. Owned by the Atlantic and Pacific Steamship Company of New York City, in April 1918 she was taken over by the Navy for World War I service and placed in commission as USS Santa Barbara (with the Navy registry ID # 4522 probably being assigned later). Between then and January 1919, while assigned to the Naval Overseas Transportation Service, she completed four round-trip voyages between New York and France. Transferred to the Cruiser and Transport Force in February 1919, she was converted to a troop transport and, beginning at the end of March 1919, was employed bringing home American service personnel. By the latter part of July 1919, Santa Barbara had made four trips from France to the U.S. for this purpose. She was then decommissioned and, in early August, returned to her owner.

Santa Barbara resumed commercial service and was later renamed American . On 11 June 1942, while off Honduras, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine off U-504 . Four of her crew lost their lives as a result of this action.

This page features the only views we have concerning the steamship Santa Barbara (of 1916) and USS Santa Barbara (ID # 4522).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

S.S. Santa Barbara (American Freighter, 1916)

Underway, prior to her World War I era Naval service.
This steamer was placed in commission on 20 April 1918 as USS Santa Barbara (ID # 4522). She was returned to her owners, the Atlantic & Pacific Steamship Company, on 6 August 1919.
The original photograph is on the official data card for Santa Paula (ID # 1590).


Early years Edit

The station went on the air as KAAP-FM in 1976 with an adult contemporary format. In 1982 it became album rock outlet KKBZ-FM ("The Buzz") before flipping to soft rock four years later as KIEZ. After being sold in 1989, KIEZ became KXPT ("The Point"), switching to smooth jazz.

On August 10, 1990, KXPT changed its call letters to KXBS [1] and adopted an oldies format called "The Bus 96.7". In 1995, the station began airing a short-lived alternative rock format.

In April 1997, KXBS flipped to Spanish adult contemporary. [2]

Radio Lazer era (1997–present) Edit

In November 1997, Lazer Broadcasting purchased KXBS for $1 million, retaining the Spanish AC format. [3] The station's callsign changed to KCZN on September 18, 1998 to match the new "Corazon" branding.

KCZN adopted the current call letters, regional Mexican format, and slogan in 2004, switching to KLJR-FM on September 2. [1]

KLJR-FM has one booster station, KLJR-FM1 in Ventura, also broadcasting on a frequency of 96.7 MHz.


Santa Paula SP-1590 - History

Cape May , a 6867 gross ton (14,495-tons displacement) freighter, was built in 1918 at Sparrows Point, Maryland, for the United States Shipping Board. Upon completion she was transferred to the Navy and placed in commission as USS Cape May (ID # 3520) in October 1918, a few weeks before the Armistice ended the First World War's fighting. The ship made one round-trip voyage between the East Coast and France between November 1918 and January 1919. Upon arrival back in the U.S., she was converted to a troop transport and made two more trips bringing American veterans home from the former European war zone. USS Cape May was decommissioned in late August 1919 and returned to the Shipping Board. Later operated by the Matson Navigation Company under the name Maliko , the ship was sold to a Hong Kong firm in 1947 and renamed Shahin .

This page features all available views concerning USS Cape May (ID # 3520) and the merchant steamship of that name. .

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Off the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company shipyard, Sparrows Point, Maryland, on 8 November 1918.
Note her pattern camouflage scheme.

This photograph was received from the U.S. Shipping Board in 1929.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 59KB 740 x 615 pixels

Arriving at the Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, New York, with troops on board, after a voyage from France in 1919.
The harbor passenger steamer Ursula is in the foreground.
Probably photographed from on board USS Santa Paula (ID # 1590).

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2006.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 73KB 740 x 450 pixels

Arriving at the Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, New York, with troops on board, after a voyage from France in 1919.
The harbor passenger steamer Ursula is in the foreground.
Probably photographed from on board USS Santa Paula (ID # 1590).

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2006.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 55KB 740 x 460 pixels

S.S. Cape May (American freighter, 1918)

In merchant service between 1919 and 1926.
This ship served as USS Cape May from October 1918 to August 1919.


Santa Paula SP-1590 - History

96.7 FM:
FROM THE BUZZ TO THE BUS

P opular Music fans in the Simi Valley/Santa Paula/Ventura area had a station of their own in the 1980s: 96.7 KKBZ.

KKBZ went on the air in 1976 as KAAP-FM. After co-owned AM 1400 pulled the plug on all-news, when NBC's News and Information Service bit the dust in 1977, they started simulcasting. Format was the Drake-Chenault "Contempo 300" which still sounded very MORish, since D-C had only changed the format name from "Hitparade" around the time the FM went on the air.

K.M. Richards was hired as KAAP's PD in 1978 and worked with D-C to make "Contempo 300" more of a true AC. They did a lot of format experimentation, ending up with an all-locally voicetracked format, 50% currents, three recurrents an hour, and the rest 60s and 70s soft rock gold.

In 1981, the stations were sold to Pac West Radio, which ripped the AC format off the air rather unceremoniously, installed a beautiful music format on the FM, and switched the AM to KKBZ as a personality-based MOR. That move proved disastrous on both stations, and they went back to simulcasting before year's end, making the format more AC while trying to be "personality", and changing the 96.7 calls to KKBZ-FM.

It was in 1982 that KKBZ-AM/FM went AOR, first with the Century 21's "Z Format" and then live. It was during the AOR years that Pac West went bankrupt and Wagontrain Communications purchased the station. In 1984, the simulcast ended, AM 1400 went back to KAAP running the Toby Arnold automated "Unforgettable" format (their version of "Music of Your Life"), and on Labor Day, 96.7 went CHR as "The New 97 FM".

Mr. Richards had left the station right before the 1981 ownership change, but came back to do weekends on the FM when the format flipped. He was upped to mornings/PD (as he had been 1978-81!) around the end of the year but left when Craig Powers was brought in to consult he had been transitioning them back to AC at the request of corporate management, but [according to Mr. Richards] "their rebellious GM wanted them to go to an even-tighter CHR and brought Craig in. (They were both gone inside of a year.)"

The switch to Hard Rock/Metal delighted those who had trouble picking up KMET or KLOS. One metal fan said he liked the fact that you could listen to it in your car on AM, then on FM when you got home.

A local band called Rager was interviewed on KKBZ, and had some tunes in the rotation. The band, now known as Fair Warning , also played many benefit concerts for charity and for people who had been injured or lost family members.

In the mid-1980s, Jesse Torrero (from KFXM San Bernardino) worked the 3-7 PM air shift and was MD and Powers' assistant. Tom Hanson (Carter) did overnights 12-6. Kaedi Kiely 's voice was heard on traffic reports. Mark Weinsoff , later to become UCSB Optimist Club President in 2003-04, did sales at KKBZ for a time.

Wagontrain, like its predecessor, went bankrupt, and both 96.7 (which, ironically, did end up AC) and AM 1400 (which switched to the Drake-Chenault oldies format several months after Richards' departure) went off the air for a while in 1986 as checks started bouncing. The license was cancelled while the station was dark (a consequence of the second bankruptcy). In fact, Jeff McMurray , who replaced Richards in mornings at 96.7, ended up doing mornings at K-Star.

The FM returned to the air when Wagontrain emerged from Chapter 11, as automated soft AC KIEZ (call change 8/15/86). KIEZ was a new license, operating with the transferred facilities of the KKBZ license. It was later sold and (on April 5, 1989) became KXPT The Point , which was a "Wave"-like soft AC format. KXBS "The Bus" became the calls on August 10, 1990. The KXBS format was oldies. (AM 1400 stayed dark until it was sold to KZTR's owners, who installed an automated country format as KCZN "Country Cousin 1400"). The AM calls changed to KKBZ in the early 90s when they flipped (back) to big band/MOR that format moved to AM 1590 in the late 90s, which is when 1400 went Spanish language.

KXBS also had a classic rock format known as "The Bus". Terrie Richards was one of the DJs. In 1996, a local college student named Kohli became an intern at KXBS, shortly before they changed to an alternative format.

In 1997, the station was sold to Lazer Broadcasting Corporation for $1 million, and on January 16, 1998, the FCC granted Lazer the license from KXBS Broadcasting Company. On August 18 of that year, the calls became KCZN ("Corazon 96.7").

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? 96.7 became KLJR on September 2, 2004, and is successful as La Mejor Romantica , a Spanish-language station. AM 1400 is now KUNX Radiovisa, Spanish news/talk.

The KKBZ calls went to an FM station in Clarinda, Iowa, at 99.3, and are now at an active rock station in Fresno, 105.1 The Blaze.


Watch the video: QUICK DRIVE AROUND SANTA PAULA CALIFORNIA. ANNIVERSARY TRIPBABY MOON VACATION. MARCH 2020. PART 1 (December 2022).

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